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anticipatory

 
 
Reply Wed 1 Apr, 2015 01:09 am
Gandalf was quite right; they began to hear goblins noises and horrible cries far behind in the passages they had come through. That sent them on faster than ever, and as poor Bilbo could not possibly go half as fast---for dwarves can roll along at a tremendous pace, I can tell you,when they have to--they took it in turn to carry him on their backs.

1) Here, "it" ( they took it in turn......) is an anticipatory and it is referring to-carry him on their bucks. When anticipatory 'it' refers to a delayed subject, I can find out easily this subject. But when anticipatory "it" refers to object, I can not find out easily to which it is indicating. Either to a topic that has been mentioned before 'it' or to a delayed object? Would you like help me how to solve this?

2) Would anybody like to explain the meaning of "That sent them on faster ......at a tremendous pace." clearly? I tried to realize the meaning, but I didn't understand.

3) Can I write the last the last sentence ( I can tell you, when they have to ....... backs) by the following way?

"I can tell you, when they have to carry him on their backs in turn."

If I can't say this, tell me why?

4) Why a comma has been placed after "I can tell you,..."? If I don't place comma, what differences will be appeared?

A lot of thanks for your help.
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dalehileman
 
  2  
Reply Wed 1 Apr, 2015 10:31 am
@Nousher Ahmed,
Quote:
Either to a topic that has been mentioned before 'it' or to a delayed object?
Ahmed that's really good q. Ordinarily but not always, such a ref applies to the last sub (in this case of course, "dwarves.") When it doesn't however, sometimes our interpretation can be hilarious

There he stood with penis still in his pants but reaching for his gun; so I was terrified when he whipped it out and pointed it at me

Inviting Con, Mac, and the rest to deal with 2)-4)

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PUNKEY
 
  2  
Reply Wed 1 Apr, 2015 01:54 pm
Gandalf was quite right; they began to hear goblins noises and horrible cries far behind in the passages they had come through. That sent them on faster than ever, and as poor Bilbo could not possibly go half as fast---for dwarves can roll along at a tremendous pace, I can tell you,when they have to--they took it in turn to carry him on their backs.

1) Here, "it" ( they took it in turn......) is an anticipatory and it is referring to-carry him on their bucks. When anticipatory 'it' refers to a delayed subject, I can find out easily this subject. But when anticipatory "it" refers to object, I can not find out easily to which it is indicating. Either to a topic that has been mentioned before 'it' or to a delayed object? Would you like help me how to solve this?

"Took it in turn" simply means that they took turns carrying him on his back. Taking turns is an expression to mean first one and then the other.

2) Would anybody like to explain the meaning of "That sent them on faster ......at a tremendous pace." clearly? I tried to realize the meaning, but I didn't understand.

"That" refers back to the frightening noise and cries.


3) Can I write the last the last sentence ( I can tell you, when they have to ....... backs) by the following way?

Believe it or not, this is a simple compound sentence, with the main subject/verb as:
That/ sent \ them . . . and . . . they/ took it in turn \ to carry/ him

What makes it so confusing are all those the clauses surrounding the main verbs.


4) Why a comma has been placed after "I can tell you,..."? If I don't place comma, what differences will be appeared?

can roll along at a tremendous pace, I can tell you,when they have to-

This is is nothing more than a personal comment, an aside pause for effect. It means the same as "believe me" or "truthfully" in the middle of the sentence. Yes, the comma is necessary.
dalehileman
 
  2  
Reply Wed 1 Apr, 2015 02:17 pm
@PUNKEY,
Wow Punk I'm impressed. Forgive if I've asked before but are you a teacher of some sort
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