9
   

Is 'fresh fruit' unaccountable?

 
 
FBM
 
  1  
Reply Fri 20 Mar, 2015 06:34 am
@contrex,
contrex wrote:

FBM wrote:
By Thor, I had me a quick gander around teh interweebs and found it expressed both ways in the US. Regional variations, I guess.

I have noticed that Americans often say "fruits" in situations where British and British Commonwealth speakers would say "fruit".



Maybe we're more pucker-butt about parallelism. Not sure.
0 Replies
 
layman
 
  -2  
Reply Fri 20 Mar, 2015 07:15 am
@contrex,
Quote:
An apple is a fruit.


Yes, as I've already said, in everyday usage it is. But not in a technical sense.

A german shepard is called a "dog," but really it is merely an "exemplar" of a generic class of animals which we call (in laymen's term) the "dog class."

If a german shepard WAS a dog, in the sense that that's what "dog' means, then a collie would NOT be a dog. It's not a german shepard, therefore not a dog, in that event.
0 Replies
 
contrex
 
  3  
Reply Fri 20 Mar, 2015 08:30 am
Layman, to put it politely, you are being incoherent. Also, what is a "shepard"?

layman
 
  -1  
Reply Fri 20 Mar, 2015 09:51 am
@contrex,
Some things, I know, are simply incomprehensible. At least to those with no capacity to comprehend, anyway.
contrex
 
  3  
Reply Fri 20 Mar, 2015 10:19 am
@layman,
layman wrote:

Some things, I know, are simply incomprehensible. At least to those with no capacity to comprehend, anyway.

Indeed, as in the present situation where the problem is your failure to observe the simple principle "whereof I do not know, thereof I should not speak."
layman
 
  -1  
Reply Fri 20 Mar, 2015 11:28 am
@contrex,
Confusing a part (or some property thereof) with the whole is commonly called the fallacy of division, which has been defined as: Inferring that something is true of one or more of the parts from the fact that it is true of the whole. For example, if the Giants are doing poorly this year, it would be fallacious to conclude that every member on the team is doing poorly."

Another example: If the whole class that a member of that class is X , then that member is also X.

X here is dog, or fruit, get it?

I'm pretty sure you don't, but just thought I'd ask.
0 Replies
 
layman
 
  -1  
Reply Fri 20 Mar, 2015 12:19 pm
@contrex,
Quote:
what is a "shepard"?

Quote:
Top Definition: Sheppard: one who herds or "sheeps" others. A Sheppard is a leader and will tend to flocks of various sizes


http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=Sheppard

Personally, I don't spell it with two p's. Nor do I spell it as "shepherd."
0 Replies
 
knaivete
 
  0  
Reply Sat 21 Mar, 2015 01:01 am
Shepard reminds me of Sheridan and othersh who cut their teeth in the same biz.
0 Replies
 
SMickey
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 Mar, 2015 08:08 pm
@contrex,
Upon seeing 'nutrient', what came into my mind was like,
'protein, calcium, fat' or things like that.
And I assumed they are not countable.
contrex
 
  2  
Reply Thu 26 Mar, 2015 10:53 am
@SMickey,
SMickey wrote:

Upon seeing 'nutrient', what came into my mind was like,
'protein, calcium, fat' or things like that.
And I assumed they are not countable.

But we can talk of nutrients, proteins and fats as countables.
FBM
 
  2  
Reply Thu 26 Mar, 2015 06:57 pm
@contrex,
Yes, they're collective nouns for different types of nutrients, proteins and fats, therefore they can be either countable or uncountable. For example, we usually use the word 'fish' as uncountable, but a marine biologist can say 'fishes' to refer to a plural number of varieties/species of fish that populate a certain body of water.
0 Replies
 
 

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