62
   

Turning The Ballot Box Against Republicans

 
 
oralloy
 
  0  
Reply Fri 9 Apr, 2021 05:37 pm
@glitterbag,
glitterbag wrote:
Actually, Eisenhower sent the first troops into Vietnam ......

Truman sent military advisers in to help the French.


glitterbag wrote:
It's OK, I know History is REALLY hard to understand.

Maybe for you. Not for me.
0 Replies
 
oralloy
 
  0  
Reply Fri 9 Apr, 2021 05:38 pm
@snood,
snood wrote:
More sensible than on most things. Except for his disagreement with mandatory masking. He saw it as an individual choice, and if he masked himself, it was of no matter to him whether his neighbors masked themselves. I kept trying to explain that the mask wearing was, in large part, to protect others from your germs, and that's why it was necessary to not only mask ourselves but to encourage others to mask themselves.

The fact that I choose to wear a mask on the rare occasions when I go out in public instead of waiting to be told to wear one doesn't mean that I oppose mandatory mask requirements.


snood wrote:
He saw masking as sort of an "I got mine" thing.

I got a box of genuine N95 masks very early in the pandemic before they were all sold out.
0 Replies
 
glitterbag
 
  4  
Reply Fri 9 Apr, 2021 07:06 pm
Ho Hum
BillW
 
  3  
Reply Fri 9 Apr, 2021 07:21 pm
@glitterbag,
Prostitute buzz job?
0 Replies
 
oralloy
 
  -2  
Reply Fri 9 Apr, 2021 07:57 pm
@izzythepush,
izzythepush wrote:
I get what you're saying, but I think the fact he got something right is miracle enough.

That's pretty silly considering the reality that you and snood are the ones who are always wrong.
0 Replies
 
oralloy
 
  -2  
Reply Fri 9 Apr, 2021 07:58 pm
@snood,
snood wrote:
Yeah I guess we have to give him credit for not being totally wrong about something. But for me it's about on par with the amount of credit I give a broken clock for being right twice a day.

Except it's actually you and izzythepush who are always wrong.
0 Replies
 
TheCobbler
 
  2  
Reply Sat 10 Apr, 2021 02:30 am
@izzythepush,
I am sure Oralloy's motivation are selfish just like his gun fetish. All about himself and not a thought for how others are surviving his 2nd amendment, unregulated "freedoms".

Socialism is about helping others, less fortunate.
TheCobbler
 
  1  
Reply Sat 10 Apr, 2021 02:31 am
@snood,
Twice a day? Maybe once a year. Smile
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  2  
Reply Sat 10 Apr, 2021 02:35 am
@TheCobbler,
I don’t think he’s motivated by anything other than, prejudice, paranoia, fear and narrow self interests.
TheCobbler
 
  2  
Reply Sat 10 Apr, 2021 02:39 am
@izzythepush,
You are too kind... Smile
0 Replies
 
Region Philbis
 
  4  
Reply Sat 10 Apr, 2021 05:39 am

https://iili.io/qsiC4s.jpg
revelette3
 
  3  
Reply Sat 10 Apr, 2021 07:03 am
@Region Philbis,
ironically funny
0 Replies
 
TheCobbler
 
  4  
Reply Sat 10 Apr, 2021 07:21 am
https://scontent-ort2-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.6435-9/170948821_10208457272107522_6831983772289442146_n.jpg?_nc_cat=1&ccb=1-3&_nc_sid=730e14&_nc_ohc=vnpPOukLHwMAX_Ftalc&_nc_ht=scontent-ort2-1.xx&oh=80997cbf65a180d3eb4ff0d7f7922527&oe=609597E7
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  4  
Reply Sun 11 Apr, 2021 01:13 am
‘Putin-style democracy’: how Republicans gerrymander the map
Quote:
Republicans believe they have a great chance to win control of the US House of Representatives in 2022, needing a swing of about six seats to depose Nancy Pelosi as speaker and derail Joe Biden’s agenda.

To help themselves over the top, they are advancing voter suppression laws in almost every state, hoping to minimize Democratic turnout.

But Republicans are also preparing another, arguably more powerful tool, which experts believe could let them take control of the House without winning a single vote beyond their 2020 tally, or for that matter blocking a single Democratic voter.

That tool is redistricting – the redrawing of congressional boundaries, undertaken once every 10 years – and Republicans have unilateral control of it in a critical number of states.

“Public sentiment in 2020 favored Democrats, and Democrats retained control of the House of Representatives,” said Samuel Wang, a professor of neuroscience and director of the Princeton gerrymandering project. “[But] because of reapportionment and redistricting, those factors would be enough to cause a change in control of the House even if public opinion were not to change at all.”

While redistricting gives politicians in some states the opportunity to redraw political boundaries, reapportionment means there are more districts to play with. After each US census, each of the 50 states is awarded a share of the 435 House seats based on population. States gain or lose seats in the process.

Owing to population growth, Republican states including Texas, Florida and North Carolina are expected to gain seats before 2022, although the breakdown has not been finalized, with the 2020 census delayed by the coronavirus pandemic.

Republican-controlled legislatures will have the power to wedge the new districts almost wherever they see fit, with a freedom they would not have enjoyed only 10 years ago, owing to a pair of controversial supreme court rulings.

“The threat of extreme gerrymandering is more acute today than it has ever been because of the combination of an abandonment of oversight by the courts and the Department of Justice, combined with new supercomputing powers,” said Josh Silver, director of Represent.us. The non-partisan group issued a report this month warning that dozens of states “have an extreme or high threat of having their election districts rigged for the next decade”.

“Frankly,” Silver said, “what we’re seeing around gerrymandering by the authoritarian wing of the Republican party is part of the Putin-style managed democracy they are promoting – that combination of voter suppression and gerrymandering.”

Rules for who controls redistricting vary from state to state. The process can involve state legislatures acting alone, governors or independent commissions. Maps are meant to stand for 10 years, although they are subject to legal challenges that can result in their being thrown out.

The new Republican gerrymandering efforts are expected to focus on urban areas in southern states that are home to a disproportionate number of voters of color – meaning those voters are more likely to be disenfranchised.

In Texas, mapmakers could try to add districts to the growing population centers of Houston and Dallas-Fort Worth without increasing representation of the minority and Democratic voters who account for that growth. In Florida they might add Republican voters to a growing Democratic district north of Orlando. In North Carolina, where the Democratic governor is shut out of the process, Republican mapmakers might seek to add a district in the Democratic-leaning Research Triangle, in a way that elects more Republicans.

Republicans could also seek to repay voters of colors in Atlanta who boosted Biden to victory and drove the defeat of two Republican senators in special elections in Georgia in January, by cracking and packing those voters into new districts.

“Republicans could net pick up one seat by rearranging the lines around Black people and other Democrats in the Atlanta area,” Wang said.

Racial gerrymandering – or using race as the central criterion for drawing district lines, as opposed to party identification or some other signifier – remains vulnerable to federal court challenges, unlike gerrymandering along partisan lines, which was declared “beyond the reach of the federal courts” by the supreme court chief justice, John Roberts, in 2019.

A separate decision by Roberts’s court, in Shelby County v Holder from 2013, is seen as adding to the likelihood of gerrymandering. The ruling released counties with acute histories of racial discrimination against voters from federal oversight imposed by the 1965 Voting Rights Act. That means that in 2021, some southern legislators will draw district boundaries without such oversight for the first time in 50 years.

‘Much more national awareness’
Potential legal challenges aside, the success of Republican mapmakers is not a given. Turnout in future elections – higher or lower – could foil expectations based on historic patterns. The partisan mix of voters in any district can change unpredictably. And stretching a map to wring out an extra seat could leave incumbents vulnerable.

Public awareness of such anti-democratic efforts has grown, said Wang, since a 2010 Republican effort called Redmap harvested dozens of “extra” seats.

“There’s much more national awareness of gerrymandering,” Wang said. “And citizen groups are now much more in the mix than they were 10 years ago.”

Silver said the gerrymandering threat has redoubled the urgency of advancing voting rights legislation that passed the US House but has stalled in the Senate.

“This is why we have to pass the For the People Act, which is federal legislation that with one pen stroke by the president would create independent commissions in all 50 states, end voter suppression and restore representative democracy in the United States,” he said.

“We have to stop gerrymandering, or there will be no representative democracy in America, period – only preordained and symbolic election results.”


TheCobbler
 
  2  
Reply Sun 11 Apr, 2021 03:46 am
@Walter Hinteler,
Can Biden end gerrymandering with an executive action pen stroke or will it take congressional approval?
Region Philbis
 
  4  
Reply Sun 11 Apr, 2021 05:22 am
@TheCobbler,
Quote:
The “For the People Act” currently being proposed by House Democrats would transform the way the
U.S. runs federal elections. Known as H.R. 1, the bill would make it substantially easier to vote.
It would also counteract restrictive legislation enacted by Republican state legislatures in recent years.

One provision stands out from the rest: the one that would end state-level gerrymandering by requiring
that all legislative districts be set by independent, nonpartisan commissions, rather than by the state
legislatures.

The good news is that this provision would do more to restore election fairness than all the rest of the
act taken together. Its benefits would be worth the cost of breaking the filibuster.

The bad news is that a conservative Supreme Court might hold that it is unconstitutional for Congress
to prescribe a system for states to design districts. That would undercut the legislation and allow
gerrymandering to continue.
bloomberg
0 Replies
 
BillW
 
  3  
Reply Sun 11 Apr, 2021 02:33 pm
@TheCobbler,
I would say that the states control their own redistricting rules and would take a Constitutional Amendment for the President or Congress to control redistricting. This would be anti-Republic if done.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Redistricting_in_the_United_States
BillW
 
  1  
Reply Sun 11 Apr, 2021 05:20 pm
@BillW,
Note, that is "Republic" not "Republican".
0 Replies
 
BillW
 
  4  
Reply Sun 11 Apr, 2021 08:45 pm
It can't get any funnier than this:
Quote:
White Lives Matter' rallies flop as hardly anyone shows up
The poor turnout underscores how the country's unpopular and disorganized extremist movements have been driven underground.

A single person arrived at Trump Tower for a "White Lives Matter" march and rally Sunday in New York City. The march was organized on the encrypted messaging platform Telegram over the last month with a call for nationwide action.

In semi-private, encrypted chats, neo-Nazis and other far-right extremists planned rallies in dozens of cities Sunday to promote their racist movements and spread their ideologies to larger audiences.

Hyped by organizers as events that would make “the whole world tremble,” the rallies ran into a major problem: Hardly anyone showed up.
................

https://news.google.com/articles/CAIiEEBaZk7ZFUwsyBzFQrF4HW0qGQgEKhAIACoHCAowvIaCCzDnxf4CMO2F8gU?hl=en-US&gl=US&ceid=US%3Aen

🤗😂😝👌

Region Philbis
 
  4  
Reply Mon 12 Apr, 2021 01:27 am
@BillW,
Quote:
A single person arrived at Trump Tower for a "White Lives Matter" march and rally Sunday in New York City


0 Replies
 
 

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