6
   

a simple English question (year 3 level)

 
 
Reply Mon 14 Apr, 2014 05:08 am
if A looks like B,

can I say that "A is like B" or "like B" or "as B"?

which is correct?
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Type: Question • Score: 6 • Views: 779 • Replies: 14
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PUNKEY
 
  1  
Reply Mon 14 Apr, 2014 08:02 am
@steelcat,
Mary is like Sue

Mary and Sue are alike.

Mary is as Sue.
0 Replies
 
dalehileman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 14 Apr, 2014 11:03 am
@steelcat,
Quote:
can I say that "A is like B"
Yes but doesn't convey the same meaning

Quote:
or "like B" or "as B"?
You'll hafta provide entire phrase
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  0  
Reply Mon 14 Apr, 2014 11:26 am
@steelcat,
Quote:
if A looks like B,

can I say that "A is like B" or "like B" or "as B"?

which is correct?


1. A is like B (in looks). YES
2. A like B. It's unnatural.
3. A as B. It's unnatural.

0 Replies
 
gungasnake
 
  0  
Reply Mon 14 Apr, 2014 11:52 am
@steelcat,
"A is AS b" is grammatically correct and might have been viewed as good usage 300 years ago but is not good usage today and will immediately alert a listener to the fact that the speaker is not a native speaker.
JTT
 
  0  
Reply Mon 14 Apr, 2014 11:56 am
@gungasnake,
Quote:
"A is AS b" is grammatically correct ...


I may be mistaken, g, but I don't think that was one of the choices.
0 Replies
 
dalehileman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 14 Apr, 2014 01:47 pm
@steelcat,
Cat where are you
" ' "like B" or "as B" ' ?" leaves some of us in the dark
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Mon 14 Apr, 2014 02:31 pm
@dalehileman,
You understand, Dale, it just isn't grammatical.
dalehileman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 14 Apr, 2014 04:21 pm
@JTT,
Yes of course JTT as nothing is entirely anything….

Still I'm puzzled
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  0  
Reply Mon 14 Apr, 2014 05:34 pm
@steelcat,
Quote:
if A looks like B,

can I say that "A is like B" or "like B" or "as B"?

which is correct?


This is very natural for some languages, steelcat, but not so much for English. However, if the context was fully known, it's possible that someone could respond in that clipped manner.
dalehileman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 15 Apr, 2014 11:26 am
@JTT,
Quote:
….can I say that "A is like B" or "like B" or "as B"?
So far, "as" apparently means "A is as B" but "like B" is still a mystery for if we apply the same logic you're asking "...can I say that... 'A is like B' or 'A is like B' ? "
0 Replies
 
aidan
 
  2  
Reply Tue 15 Apr, 2014 11:53 am
@steelcat,
If you're trying to connote a similarity in terms of how two separate entities look (specifically), as a native English speaker, I'd find it most natural-sounding and clear in terms of meaning to say:

1) A and B resemble each other
2) A and B look alike

I would not find it natural to say: 'A is as B' or readily grasp the fact that you're comparing their outward appearance if you said either that or 'A is like B'.
0 Replies
 
anonymously99
 
  1  
Reply Wed 16 Apr, 2014 02:27 am
@steelcat,
AB

As in A looks like B.

Yeah, having visible abs would be nice.
neologist
 
  1  
Reply Fri 18 Apr, 2014 03:23 pm
@anonymously99,
anonymously99 wrote:
AB

As in A looks like B.

Yeah, having visible abs would be nice.
Yeah!
I used to have a 6 pack.
Now it's in a gunny sack!

And A is a dead ringer for B.
0 Replies
 
bobsal u1553115
 
  1  
Reply Wed 23 Apr, 2014 12:23 am
https://scontent-b.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-prn1/t1.0-9/10177886_10152115177621275_4539861359518574176_n.jpg
0 Replies
 
 

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