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Prepositions

 
 
Reply Mon 7 Apr, 2014 04:53 am
Hello,
is it possible to say :"She's just going out of the door"?

I prefer :"She's just going through / out the door."

Thanks,
ebelinda
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Type: Question • Score: 6 • Views: 1,261 • Replies: 24
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Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 7 Apr, 2014 05:03 am
Yes, it is possible to say that, and many native speakers of English would say it in certain contexts.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 7 Apr, 2014 05:03 am
By the way, "She's just going out the door." would probably be more commonly used
ebelinda
 
  1  
Reply Mon 7 Apr, 2014 05:09 am
@Setanta,
Thank youvery much.
eb
0 Replies
 
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 7 Apr, 2014 05:44 am
@ebelinda,
Yes and it's quite acceptable.

The complete and more formal way of saying the full sentence would be "out of the door"; however "out the door" is fine, as well.
ebelinda
 
  1  
Reply Mon 7 Apr, 2014 08:11 am
@Ragman,
Thank you, could you answer another question, please:
prepositions "in" and "into" - What's the difference between " He jumped in the lake" and "He jumped into the lake".
Thanks,
eb
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 7 Apr, 2014 08:23 am
@ebelinda,
No significant difference. You can use them interchangeably in this instance. However, in a different context, it would not be acceptable to use interchangeably.

For example you could correctly say, "something in his mind was wrong ." However, you would not say, "something into his mind was wrong."
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Mon 7 Apr, 2014 10:19 am
@Setanta,
Setanta wrote:

By the way, "She's just going out the door." would probably be more commonly used


Not in Britain.
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Mon 7 Apr, 2014 12:48 pm
@Ragman,
Quote:
The complete and more formal way of saying the full sentence would be "out of the door"; however "out the door" is fine, as well.


I'm not sure that that's true.
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Mon 7 Apr, 2014 12:50 pm
@ebelinda,
Quote:
I prefer :"She's just going through / out the door.


For the meaning, She's just leaving, I don't believe I've ever heard the first one.
0 Replies
 
ebelinda
 
  1  
Reply Mon 7 Apr, 2014 01:17 pm
@Ragman,
Thank you, it was just this particular sentence that I was wondering whether they're both acceptable.

eb
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 7 Apr, 2014 01:31 pm
@ebelinda,
You're welcome.
0 Replies
 
Mika Anna
 
  0  
Reply Wed 9 Apr, 2014 10:21 am
@ebelinda,
"Of" is used in many cases when it's unnecessary. I looked it up once and found that "of", in these cases, should be used before pronouns. She's just going out of US (a very weird sentence, but I'm trying to keep your example), and She's just going out THE DOOR. I think the use of "of" is incorrect in the sentence you gave.
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Wed 9 Apr, 2014 10:47 am
@Mika Anna,
Mika Anna wrote:

I think the use of "of" is incorrect in the sentence you gave.


It is absolutely correct. Omitting it is nonstandard.

JTT
 
  0  
Reply Wed 9 Apr, 2014 11:19 am
@contrex,
Quote:
It is absolutely correct. Omitting it is nonstandard.


Typically confused Contrex. What is it that you are you trying to say, C?
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Wed 9 Apr, 2014 12:52 pm
@JTT,
JTT wrote:

Typically confused Contrex. What is it that you are you trying to say, C?


No confusion. Saying "She went out of the door" is standard English, whereas "She went out the door" is something Joe Sixpack from East Teaneck would say.
JTT
 
  0  
Reply Wed 9 Apr, 2014 12:55 pm
@contrex,
Go ahead and provide proof for your contention.
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Wed 9 Apr, 2014 01:38 pm
@JTT,
JTT wrote:

Go ahead and provide proof for your contention.


Hi, I'm Joseph Q Sixpack III from East Teaneck, I'm over in Spain visiting my old pal Contrex and I sure as hell would say "She went out the door". I used to say "Outta da door" but I've been taking speech lessons. I still have a ways to go!

JTT
 
  0  
Reply Wed 9 Apr, 2014 01:46 pm
@contrex,
I really never expected anything better than that, Contrex, but I didn't expect you to so loudly proclaim, "As regards the English language, I know sweet tweet!"
contrex
 
  0  
Reply Wed 9 Apr, 2014 03:50 pm
@JTT,
JTT wrote:

I really never expected anything better than that, Contrex, but I didn't expect you to so loudly proclaim, "As regards the English language, I know sweet tweet!"


I haven't said this for a while, so maybe it's time to bring it up again. Are you some kind of Assberger sufferer? You certainly are a tosser.

 

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