7
   

What does "t" mean in this handwriting?

 
 
McTag
 
  3  
Reply Sun 6 Apr, 2014 03:09 pm
@JTT,

Quote:
I'll let you illustrate how this isn't McTag's usual delusionary maundering at play here.

After all it is "your" contention cribbed from one of your style manuals.


Bollocks.
I said "good" was not an adverb. You made a sarcastic comment about that, appearing to disagree.
Is that the best you can do?
JTT
 
  0  
Reply Sun 6 Apr, 2014 08:15 pm
@McTag,
Quote:
I said "good" was not an adverb.


I'll let you illustrate how this isn't McTag's usual delusionary maundering at play here.

After all it is "your" contention cribbed from one of your style manuals.

McTag
 
  2  
Reply Mon 7 Apr, 2014 01:44 am
@JTT,

Will you quit the coy fluttering of the fan.
****, or get off the pot.
oristarA
 
  3  
Reply Mon 7 Apr, 2014 07:35 am
Well guys, it will produce no victor.
Just forget it and have fun.
JTT
 
  -1  
Reply Mon 7 Apr, 2014 09:23 am
@McTag,
I'll let you illustrate how this isn't McTag's usual delusionary maundering at play here.

After all it is "your" contention cribbed from one of your style manuals.
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  -1  
Reply Mon 7 Apr, 2014 09:30 am
@oristarA,
Let everyone know I'm doing good.
------------------

McTag shows some sense on occasion, Ori, look at the NONE thread. Then in complete defiance of reality out comes the nonsense he's now spouting. You recognized he was in error.
McTag
 
  2  
Reply Mon 7 Apr, 2014 11:12 am
@JTT,

Either **** or get off the pot.
JTT
 
  -1  
Reply Mon 7 Apr, 2014 11:23 am
@McTag,
It's your boo boo, McTag. You show us how good is not an adverb. Come on, type us some fowler or give us something from some other sage from your extensive library of prescriptivists.

McTag
 
  2  
Reply Mon 7 Apr, 2014 02:12 pm
@JTT,

I am one of those eager to learn. If you say good can be used as an adverb in a grammatical sentence, I'm all agog to see it.
JTT
 
  -1  
Reply Mon 7 Apr, 2014 03:08 pm
@McTag,
Quote:
I am one of those eager to learn. If you say good can be used as an adverb in a grammatical sentence, I'm all agog to see it.


One would presume that a body so in tune with the workings of the English language would know what a dictionary is and how to use one.

McTag
 
  1  
Reply Mon 7 Apr, 2014 03:55 pm
@JTT,

adv N American colloq

I said, grammatical English.
JTT
 
  -1  
Reply Mon 7 Apr, 2014 04:42 pm
@McTag,
I guess we can accept that, McTag. It wasn't you being ignorant on language, it was you poking fun at Setanta.
oristarA
 
  1  
Reply Mon 7 Apr, 2014 07:20 pm
@JTT,
JTT wrote:

Quote:
I am one of those eager to learn. If you say good can be used as an adverb in a grammatical sentence, I'm all agog to see it.


One would presume that a body so in tune with the workings of the English language would know what a dictionary is and how to use one.



Better be straight and come to the point, JTT. Just give him one good example. He's honest, isn't he?
JTT
 
  -1  
Reply Mon 7 Apr, 2014 07:51 pm
@oristarA,
I'm not the babysitter for these nimrods, Ori. There's been an example from the get go.

Quote:
He's honest, isn't he?


No comment.
0 Replies
 
McTag
 
  3  
Reply Tue 8 Apr, 2014 02:23 am
@JTT,

Quote:
it was you poking fun at Setanta.


I never did that, and you are mixing this up with another thread.

I can see why you were being so coy and evasive. Your sentence would have read as uttered by a hayseed from the pages of Mark Twain or a hood created by Damon Runyan. And you didn't want to sound silly, did you?
If OristarA was studying Jamaican patois or Louisiana creole maybe, but he's not. We're striving for standard English here.

That "good" can be, and is, used as an adverb can be seen from Post #1, but that doesn't make it right. Or "+" to stand for "and", come to that.
McTag
 
  3  
Reply Tue 8 Apr, 2014 02:26 am
@McTag,
OristarA
Quote:
McTag may have inadvertently made the trivial mistake.


Not this time, buddy. I done good.
The Grammar Troll has over-reached himself again.
Mr Supercilious Sarcasm is hoist with his own petard.

(JTT can explain that, I'm sure.)
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  -1  
Reply Tue 8 Apr, 2014 07:39 am
@McTag,
Quote:

I never did that, and you are mixing this up with another thread.


That leaves us with the inescapable conclusion that it was you being your usual ignorant self on language.

Quote:


I can see why you were being so coy and evasive. Your sentence would have read as uttered by a hayseed from the pages of Mark Twain or a hood created by Damon Runyan. And you didn't want to sound silly, did you?
If OristarA was studying Jamaican patois or Louisiana creole maybe, but he's not. We're striving for standard English here.

That "good" can be, and is, used as an adverb can be seen from Post #1, but that doesn't make it right. Or "+" to stand for "and", come to that.


I just wanted to get all that abysmal ignorance recorded. You don't have the foggiest notion what constitutes right as regards language. You are a litany of ignorance.

The only one being coy was you, as you always are. Plant your seeds of ignorance and then obfuscate to beat the band.

Yes, Ori, McTag is terribly dishonest. You already know how ignorant he is as regards language.

------------------

M-W

Main Entry: 3good
Function: adverb
Date: 13th century
1 : well <he showed me how good I was doing — Herbert Gold> 2 —used as an intensive <a good long time>
usage Adverbial good has been under attack from the schoolroom since the 19th century. Insistence on well rather than good has resulted in a split in connotation: well is standard, neutral, and colorless, while good is emotionally charged and emphatic. This makes good the adverb of choice in sports <“I'm seeing the ball real good” is what you hear — Roger Angell>. In such contexts as <listen up. And listen good — Alex Karras> <lets fly with his tomatoes before they can flee. He gets Clarence good — Charles Dickinson> good cannot be adequately replaced by well. Adverbial good is primarily a spoken form; in writing it occurs in reported and fictional speech and in generally familiar or informal contexts.

McTag
 
  2  
Reply Tue 8 Apr, 2014 03:52 pm
@JTT,

At last, something substantive and halfway interesting from JTT on the subject.
I see you revert to an American text to try to justify American slang. It's not something I would rely on.

Let's have that sentence now, and see if you can avoid it sounding rustic or gauche.
JTT
 
  0  
Reply Tue 8 Apr, 2014 04:51 pm
@McTag,
Quote:
At last, something substantive and halfway interesting from JTT on the subject.


Once again I'm left with the task of fixing McTag's fuckups.

Quote:
I see you revert to an American text to try to justify American slang.


Your ignorance knows no bounds, McTag. You often use slang. Everyone does.

--------------------
Grammar Puss

...

As for slang, I'm all for it! I don't know how I ever did without [to flame] (protest self-righteously), [to dis] (express disrespect for), and [to blow off] (dismiss an obligation), and there are thousands of now-unexceptionable English words like [clever], [fun], [sham], [banter], [mob], and [stingy] that began life as slang. It is especially hypocritical to oppose linguistic innovations reflexively and at the same time to decry the loss of distinctions like [lie] versus [lay] on the pretext of preserving expressive power. Vehicles for expressing thought are being created far more quickly than they are being lost.

http://pinker.wjh.harvard.edu/articles/media/1994_01_24_thenewrepublic.html
McTag
 
  2  
Reply Wed 9 Apr, 2014 03:01 am
@JTT,

Quote:
Let's have that sentence now, and see if you can avoid it sounding rustic or gauche.
0 Replies
 
 

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