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Is this an appropriate use of "your"?

 
 
Reply Sat 15 Feb, 2014 10:32 am
I would appreciate feedback as to whether the following is an appropriate use of "your." Thanks.

Your employment/continued employment may be condition upon your signing a separate and binding Confidentiality, Non-disclosure and Non-compete Agreement.
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Type: Question • Score: 2 • Views: 833 • Replies: 17
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contrex
 
  1  
Reply Sat 15 Feb, 2014 12:50 pm
@bgartenberg,
Yes, "your signing" is perfectly appropriate. However "condition" needs to be "conditional".
bgartenberg
 
  1  
Reply Sat 15 Feb, 2014 01:46 pm
@contrex,
Thanks... that was a typo... Actually, I think meant to say "conditioned"...
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Sat 15 Feb, 2014 02:12 pm
@bgartenberg,
bgartenberg wrote:

Thanks... that was a typo... Actually, I think meant to say "conditioned"...

Well, that's wrong as well. If the employment may depend on signing the agreement then it may be conditional on signing. Who wrote this stuff?

bgartenberg
 
  1  
Reply Sat 15 Feb, 2014 02:17 pm
@contrex,
OK, thanks again. Can't say who the original author was... but I'll note your comment.
0 Replies
 
dalehileman
 
  1  
Reply Sat 15 Feb, 2014 02:34 pm
@bgartenberg,
It's okay Bg tho you can omit it entirely since it's slightly redundant

I'd say "…conditioned…"


Edited to agree more with Con aabove
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Sat 15 Feb, 2014 02:38 pm
@dalehileman,
dalehileman wrote:

I'd say "…conditioned…"


I wouldn't say that at all. I might say that signing the agreement is a condition of employment, but where does the idea of using "conditioned" come from?
dalehileman
 
  1  
Reply Sat 15 Feb, 2014 02:40 pm
@bgartenberg,
Or Bg you might say "a condition"
0 Replies
 
dalehileman
 
  1  
Reply Sat 15 Feb, 2014 02:43 pm
@contrex,
Quote:
I wouldn't say that at all.
Yes, no Con, see my #….741 above

Quote:
…...but where does the idea of using "conditioned" come from?
It just popped out of my head but I think it's okay
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Sat 15 Feb, 2014 02:50 pm
@dalehileman,
dalehileman wrote:

Quote:
…...but where does the idea of using "conditioned" come from?
It just popped out of my head but I think it's okay


it might be a US English thing (although I never heard it before), in UK English we would say "conditional".

Update - it is common US English in contracts - I found this on the web:

Code:This Purchase Order is expressly conditioned upon Seller's assent that the terms and conditions
set forth herein shall be the sole and exclusive terms and conditions applicable
bgartenberg
 
  1  
Reply Sat 15 Feb, 2014 03:55 pm
@contrex,
I think the phrasing is less than elegant in any case. But, if one would say "conditional," it would seem to me that the employment was granted, but could be terminated if the agreement wasn't signed in the future. Whereas, if one says "conditioned," it would seem to indicate that the employment would not be grant unless the agreement was signed.

Thank you all for your thoughts. Keep them coming. Smile
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Sat 15 Feb, 2014 06:14 pm
@bgartenberg,
bgartenberg wrote:
if one would say "conditional," it would seem to me that the employment was granted, but could be terminated if the agreement wasn't signed in the future. Whereas, if one says "conditioned," it would seem to indicate that the employment would not be grant unless the agreement was signed.


They mean the same thing. If I say "My agreement to pay you $1000 is conditional upon you marrying my daughter", that means you won't get the money until after you have married her. The marriage is a condition of getting the money. Likewise someone who wishes to get or keep a job has to sign the agreement first.
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Sat 15 Feb, 2014 10:37 pm
@contrex,
Contrex: My agreement to pay you $1000 is conditional upon you marrying my daughter",
----------------

That hardly seems like enough money if she is as thick as you, C. Smile
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Sun 16 Feb, 2014 02:48 am
@JTT,
JTT wrote:

Contrex: My agreement to pay you $1000 is conditional upon you marrying my daughter",
----------------

That hardly seems like enough money if she is as thick as you, C. Smile


Her tits aren't bad.

anonymously99
 
  -1  
Reply Sun 16 Feb, 2014 10:09 am
@bgartenberg,
First thoughts after reading.. yes. Your is used correctly. It is "their" signing.

Second thoughts.. this can't be good.

Third thoughts.. ****.

Fourth thoughts.. if you're not in love with her then why would you agree? To have more blood on your hands? Some ******* deal. She'll probably annoy the **** out of you if she understood what was going on right now just so you would shoot her. If she weren't in love. Who knows. She may never know about this.

Fifth thoughts.. ******* idiot.
0 Replies
 
anonymously99
 
  0  
Reply Sun 16 Feb, 2014 10:13 am
@JTT,
Quote:
Contrex: My agreement to pay you $1000 is conditional upon you marrying my daughter",


Quote:
That hardly seems like enough money if she is as thick as you, C.


Yeah too bad if she's over-weight due to her mental health. You'll just have to shoot her.

Then suck the guy's dick for the $1000 (thousand).

Trust me JTT. There are way more men out there than you who happen to be more attractive mentally and physically. Who happen to be older in age than you, along with being more mature than you. You are the last thing on that woman's mind.
anonymously99
 
  0  
Reply Sun 16 Feb, 2014 10:22 am
@contrex,
Quote:
Her tits aren't bad.


Delusional.
0 Replies
 
anonymously99
 
  0  
Reply Sun 16 Feb, 2014 10:34 am
@anonymously99,
Let's be honest JTT. The man who offered you the thousand most likely has no intent of giving you the thousand. He will make sure she his daughter fails at everything so she can never be yours so you will shoot her. That sounds about right.
0 Replies
 
 

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