5
   

Like any Democrats would be so foolish

 
 
Reply Fri 18 Oct, 2013 10:34 am
Actor and former California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger is working to change the law so he can mount a 2016 presidential run, according to a New York Post report.

The newspaper quotes unnamed sources who say the actor, who’s in New York City to promote his latest movie, “has been talking openly about working on getting the constitutional rules changed.”

The source said the 66-year-old Schwarzenegger, a Republican, intends to file the necessary paperwork to challenge the rules.


The U.S. Constitution forbids foreign-born citizens from holding the chief executive position, but some legal experts have said it’s not completely clear that courts would enforce the law instead of letting voters decide.

Constitutional amendments require two-thirds majority approval in both the House and the Senate and then must be ratified by at least 38 of the 50 states.
 
Lustig Andrei
 
  3  
Reply Fri 18 Oct, 2013 02:15 pm
@edgarblythe,
It's just saber-rattling PR, imo. (1) Schwarzenegger can't change the law without getting the Constitution amended; (2) "some legal experts said it's not completely clear that courts would enforce the law" is just a minority opinion; and (3) I doubt at this point that the former Governator could muster enough votes to even come close to getting the GOP nomination. Must be a slow news day the Post.
0 Replies
 
rosborne979
 
  2  
Reply Fri 18 Oct, 2013 02:28 pm
@edgarblythe,
It's good press for Arnold while promoting his new movie. If there's one thing Arnold's good at, it's putting on a show Smile

(See, it's already working... I didn't even know he had a new movie until I saw this)
0 Replies
 
McGentrix
 
  2  
Reply Fri 18 Oct, 2013 02:33 pm
Let me see if I get the accent right...

"We don' want no steenken furriners runnin r cuntry!"
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Fri 18 Oct, 2013 03:28 pm
@McGentrix,
You are one clever teapartier, McG.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Fri 18 Oct, 2013 03:45 pm
I'm mixed on him. We differ politically and, uh, re some of his lifestyle decisions. But I don't dislike him, somehow. Literally ran into him once when I was going in a cafe or store (I forget which) and he was coming out. We didn't crash but it was sort of funny. He had an office on a street that was in my neighborhood, and also the street our firm was on for a bunch of years. I remember friend-spatting with Lightwizard about him, he being for him for Governor. Later, when he was governor, I vaguely remember liking some of his moves and not others. Anyway, I take it as career PR.

I might rather see our Ticomaya run, not joking, I'm a Tico fan.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Fri 18 Oct, 2013 04:16 pm
He did some unrepublican type things, because that's what you have to do to run California. But I no longer vote for Republicans, regardless. Not to say I never will, but not as things stand now.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  4  
Reply Fri 18 Oct, 2013 04:36 pm
Candidates for the office of President are responsible for proving that they are eligible for the office They are assumed to be ineligible until they provide such proof. John McCain was eligible because a statute was passed granting the children born in the Panama Canal Zone, born to U.S. citizens, the status of natural born citizens. Barack Obama was eligible for the simple reason that he was born in the United States. It currently appears that Cruz is ineligible. The Governator was not born on U.S. soil and neither of his parents were U.S. citizens. He loses.

This page at the Constitution Society is very interesting. The Constitution Society is a private organization, and has no legal authority in the United States. They have, however, a sterling record for careful scholarship.
0 Replies
 
Lustig Andrei
 
  2  
Reply Fri 18 Oct, 2013 04:36 pm
Kind of ironic that after all the fuss the 'birthers' (just another name for 'teapartiers') made about whether or not Obama was born within the bounds of the USA, the GOP would even consider backing anyone who is admittedly not a native-born citizen.

(On the other hand, they also decided to vehemently oppose a health-care plan which was closely patterned on one enacted in Massachusetts by its Republican governor Romney at the time. Laughing)
0 Replies
 
 

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