6
   

weaker VS more weakly

 
 
SMickey
 
Reply Wed 21 Aug, 2013 09:00 am
I'm a Korean who wishes to be crackerjack at English.

Let me give you two sentences, and please tell me which sounds more natural.

1. Sales of cars dropped by 3 percent, reflecting a somewhat weaker demand than expected.

2. Sales of cars dropped by 3 percent, reflecting a somewhat more weakly demand than expected.

The only difference here is, as shown, 'weaker' and 'more weakly' part.
Some of my folks say neither sounds okay and 'more weaklier' fits better here.

My guess is 'weakly' usually refers to , as far as I know, the status of people's health.

So, the second sentence is likely to sound a bit awkward as it's talking about people's desire of cars, not the status of people's physical health.

This is all I can think about.

Could you tell me which sounds quite natural to you, native speakers?

I'd appreciate any of your comment.
Thank you in advance.
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Type: Question • Score: 6 • Views: 3,013 • Replies: 36
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contrex
 
  1  
Reply Wed 21 Aug, 2013 09:43 am
bm

dalehileman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 21 Aug, 2013 10:28 am
@SMickey,
Mick, 2) is definitely not collo

….."more weakly" usu modifyibng a verb as in

"..reflects more weakly the demand usually expected"
dalehileman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 21 Aug, 2013 10:32 am
@contrex,
As far ai I (we?) know Con, "bm" means bowel movement. Have I somehow been passed here

Forgive pun
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Wed 21 Aug, 2013 10:51 am
@dalehileman,
dalehileman wrote:
As far ai I (we?) know Con, "bm" means bowel movement.


I saw another person use it; when I asked them what it meant they said it stands for 'bookmark'. I placed that very short post there so that this thread would appear in my "My Posts" list. This was because I saw the question while I was browsing the web on my phone, and I did not fancy doing much typing, especially as the bus ride was rather bumpy. I can forgive many things, especially puns, especially when (refreshingly) the perpetrator is also demonstrating that he knows the difference between "passed" and "past". (Many younger folks don't, I have found).

Now to the question:

Quote:
1. Sales of cars dropped by 3 percent, reflecting a somewhat weaker demand than expected.


The first sentence is natural and grammatical.

Quote:
2. Sales of cars dropped by 3 percent, reflecting a somewhat more weakly demand than expected.


The second sentence "sounds unnatural", and this is because it contains a serious and glaring grammatical error. The word "weakly" is an adverb, and cannot be used as an adjective as it is in that sentence. You could use "more weak", but that uses one extra word for no good reason.
dalehileman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 21 Aug, 2013 01:56 pm
@contrex,
Yea, Con, adverb. That's the term I couldn't wreckemember
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Wed 21 Aug, 2013 03:42 pm
Weak is an adjective, weakly is an adverb. Sentence number two is wrong, wrong, wrong.
dalehileman
 
  0  
Reply Wed 21 Aug, 2013 04:06 pm
@Setanta,
"Weakly" can be ad adj

http://onelook.com/?w=weakly&ls=a

Though in this instance definitely not collo
0 Replies
 
SMickey
 
  1  
Reply Wed 21 Aug, 2013 06:46 pm
@dalehileman,
So, the reason 'more weakly' isn't good enough is that it's an adverb, not an adjective. I see.

My guess that the term 'weakly' is used when describing people's health is not correct then.

Thanks a lot, Mr.. Miss?
Thanks a million, Dalehileman.
SMickey
 
  0  
Reply Wed 21 Aug, 2013 06:46 pm
@contrex,
BM? What did you mean by that?
0 Replies
 
MontereyJack
 
  2  
Reply Wed 21 Aug, 2013 06:54 pm
contrex is right. In the context of online discussion groups, "bm" is almost invariably an abbreviation for "bookmark", unless the discussion group is discussing intestinal processes.

I'm not sure "more weaklier" could ever be correct, in any circumstances. I'd drop the people who recommended that from your circle of advisers.

Go with 1.
SMickey
 
  1  
Reply Wed 21 Aug, 2013 07:40 pm
@MontereyJack,
Thanks. I think I need to tell off those who recommended 'weaklier'.
0 Replies
 
dalehileman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 23 Aug, 2013 10:48 am
@SMickey,
Quote:
So, the reason 'more weakly' isn't good enough is that it's an adverb, not an adjective. I see.
Sorry Mick if I wasn't clear; it's a matter of old age and incipient Alz's. "More weakly" technically is okay where it's adj, but it's just not collo

Quote:
My guess that the term 'weakly' is used when describing people's health is not correct then.
To the contrary it's quite applicable: "A more weakly condition taking hold" is quite correct tho as I said, not collo

Quote:
Thanks a lot, Mr.. Miss?
The former, I'm a grandpa

Quote:
Thanks a million, Dalehileman.
Not at all, for what it's worth, not much hereaboout
Setanta
 
  2  
Reply Fri 23 Aug, 2013 11:32 am
@dalehileman,
You peddle such gross horseshit, you really have no business answering questions like this. To claim that "A more weakly condition taking hold" is correct is utter horseshit. In that phrase, weakly is in the position of an adjective, and it simply is not acceptable as a adjective in that construction. You just make **** up to make it appear what you know what you're talking about, and you don't.
dalehileman
 
  0  
Reply Fri 23 Aug, 2013 11:36 am
@Setanta,
Quote:
…...gross horseshit,…..utter horseshit…….simply is not acceptable…….You just make **** up…….


But Set it says here I can do that

http://onelook.com/?w=weakly&ls=a

Pray where have I gone wrong
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Fri 23 Aug, 2013 11:36 am
By the way, "collo" is a combining form meaning gelatinous, or glue-like. I don't know what the hell you think you're saying, but as usual, you're not saying anything in English.
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Fri 23 Aug, 2013 11:37 am
@Setanta,
Setanta wrote:

To claim that "A more weakly condition taking hold" is correct is utter horseshit. In that phrase, weakly is in the position of an adjective, and it simply is not acceptable as a adjective in that construction.


It might be a regional dialect thing where DH lives; many Brits say "he is very poorly" (unwell) and I know Yorkshire folk sometimes say "He is badly" to mean the same thing, maybe where DH lives they say "he is weakly, sho' nuff" or something like that? These things are not standard English.

Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Fri 23 Aug, 2013 11:38 am
@dalehileman,
You posted that **** before, you're crazy as hell if you think you can send me off on some fool's errand to make your case for you. If you're too stupid to see that both in sentence number two and in that horseshit you just posted what is called for is an adjective, and "weakly" doesn't fit, it's not my mission to enlighten you.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Fri 23 Aug, 2013 11:39 am
@contrex,
The only regional dialect that he speaks is moron.
0 Replies
 
dalehileman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 23 Aug, 2013 11:42 am
@Setanta,
Quote:
"collo" is a combining form meaning gelatinous
Alas Set my most abject apologies once more

Just how does one abbreviate "colloquial"
 

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