34
   

I am a Buddhist and if anyone wants to question my beliefs then they are welcome to do so...

 
 
IRFRANK
 
  2  
Reply Sun 2 Feb, 2014 09:36 pm
@igm,
Quote:
Was the article interesting to you and why?


It's interesting that business people would listen to a Buddhist monk. I think I am a pragmatic Buddhist. The common sense 'rules' or virtues are meaningful to me and I think they have a lot to offer to anyone. We humans keep making the same mistakes over and over. Buddha showed us a way out. There has been a lot of discussion here about enlightenment and if it is attainable. That is important and worthy of honest debate, but the true value of Buddhas teachings are in how one views the world and relates to it. Deciding enlightenment is an illusion and throwing out the teachings or dharma is a mistake. At least in my opinion. One doesn't have to be a monk to gain value from the dharma. If the dharma can get more exposure it would be a good thing.
JLNobody
 
  2  
Reply Mon 3 Feb, 2014 11:18 pm
@IRFRANK,
Amen IRF.
0 Replies
 
Wilso
 
  1  
Reply Tue 4 Feb, 2014 02:26 am
I'm generally sympathetic & tolerant towards Buddhists - after all, I married one. After reading a few posts on this thread, I wanted to scratch my eyes out. I just read the same **** as Christians push. In a different guise. I've got a happiness that you don't have thanks to the teachings blah blah blah etc etc etc.
igm
 
  1  
Reply Tue 4 Feb, 2014 03:54 am
@Wilso,
Okay, thanks for your opinion... if you backed it up with some reasons and examples that would be useful or did you just want to vent?
Wilso
 
  1  
Reply Tue 4 Feb, 2014 04:56 am
@igm,
igm wrote:

Okay, thanks for your opinion... if you backed it up with some reasons and examples that would be useful or did you just want to vent?


One of your own previous posts, where you denigrated the happiness of others with respect to your own. And no, I'm not going to search for it again to give you the opportunity to defend etc etc etc
igm
 
  1  
Reply Tue 4 Feb, 2014 07:28 am
@Wilso,
I merely said that unconditioned happiness must be better than conditioned happiness because it doesn't depend on conditions. The unconditioned happiness is available to everyone it is part of our nature it is not mine e.g. golf depends on many causes and conditions in order for it to make one happy... unconditioned happiness does not depend on any conditions.... that is not denigration it is merely pointing out the obvious and that it is available to everyone.
0 Replies
 
Frank Apisa
 
  1  
Reply Tue 4 Feb, 2014 08:22 am
@Wilso,
Wilso wrote:

I'm generally sympathetic & tolerant towards Buddhists - after all, I married one. After reading a few posts on this thread, I wanted to scratch my eyes out. I just read the same **** as Christians push. In a different guise. I've got a happiness that you don't have thanks to the teachings blah blah blah etc etc etc.


Right on the button here, Wilso.

But they cannot see it....because they are willingly blind!
0 Replies
 
Frank Apisa
 
  1  
Reply Tue 4 Feb, 2014 08:25 am
@Wilso,
Wilso wrote:

igm wrote:

Okay, thanks for your opinion... if you backed it up with some reasons and examples that would be useful or did you just want to vent?


One of your own previous posts, where you denigrated the happiness of others with respect to your own. And no, I'm not going to search for it again to give you the opportunity to defend etc etc etc


It would be useless in any case, Wilso, because igm will go on and on about "unconditional happiness" (which means whatever he is feeling)...and how that is better than "conditional happiness" (which is whatever anyone who disagrees with him is feeling)...which is always described as inferior.

Buddhists can be every bit as unreasonable and self-centered as any other cult.
0 Replies
 
igm
 
  1  
Reply Tue 4 Feb, 2014 08:43 am
@Wilso,
http://able2know.org/topic/220485-56#post-5570938
igm
 
  1  
Reply Tue 4 Feb, 2014 08:49 am
@igm,
http://www.tricycle.com/feature/science-delusion
Frank Apisa
 
  1  
Reply Tue 4 Feb, 2014 08:52 am
@igm,



http://able2know.org/topic/220485-56#post-5570985


0 Replies
 
IRFRANK
 
  1  
Reply Tue 4 Feb, 2014 09:04 am
@Wilso,
I am sorry that you feel that way.
0 Replies
 
igm
 
  1  
Reply Tue 4 Feb, 2014 09:28 am
@igm,


"Bringing Buddhist meditation techniques into industry accomplishes two things for industry. It does actually give companies like Google something useful for an employee’s well-being, but it also neutralizes a potentially disruptive adversary. Buddhism has its own orienting perspectives, attitudes, and values, as does American corporate culture. And not only are they very different from each other, they are also often fundamentally opposed to each other.

A benign way to think about this is that once people experience the benefits of mindfulness they will become interested in the dharma and develop a truer appreciation for Buddhism—and that would be fine. But the problem is that neither Buddhists nor employees are in control of how this will play out. Industry is in control. This is how ideology works. It takes something that has the capacity to be oppositional, like Buddhism, and it redefines it. And somewhere down the line, we forget that it ever had its own meaning.

It’s not that any one active ideology accomplishes all that needs to be done; rather, it is the constant repetition of certain themes and ideas that tend to construct a kind of “nature.” Ideology functions by saying “this is nature”—this is the way things are; this is the way the world is. So, Obama talks about STEM, scientists talk about the human computer, universities talk about “workforce preparation,” and industry talks about the benefits of the neuroscience of meditation, but it all becomes something that feels like a consistent world, and after a while we lose the ability to look at it skeptically. At that point we no longer bother to ask to be treated humanly. At that point we accept our fate as mere functions. Ideology’s job is to make people believe that their prison is a pleasure dome."

Linda Heuman is a Tricycle contributing editor.
igm
 
  1  
Reply Tue 4 Feb, 2014 09:42 am
@igm,
Added to my last post.
0 Replies
 
IRFRANK
 
  1  
Reply Tue 4 Feb, 2014 11:18 am
@igm,
Quote:
But the problem is that neither Buddhists nor employees are in control of how this will play out. Industry is in control.


I don't agree with this. The teacher has a great deal of control. And don't assume the employees are sheep. I don't think this will go far. Bringing religion into the workplace is generally frowned upon. I wouldn't appreciate being preached to in a company meeting. I do see the point.
0 Replies
 
Wilso
 
  2  
Reply Tue 4 Feb, 2014 04:27 pm
I once saw a christian TV ad that basically said only christians can feel true love. The OP here is saying his happiness is more valid because of it's source. All the same **** in a different bucket.
Romeo Fabulini
 
  1  
Reply Tue 4 Feb, 2014 04:42 pm
Buddha was just a human giving us his best guesses and hunches, whereas Jesus was giving us the words of God himself-
"For I have not spoken on my own authority; but the Father who sent me gave me a command, what I should say and what I should speak" (John 12:49)

Spot the difference?..Smile
reasoning logic
 
  1  
Reply Tue 4 Feb, 2014 04:48 pm
@Romeo Fabulini,
How can you be sure that the words he spoke were not being made up by his own brain, the same way that you might think of another person who makes such claims today?
IRFRANK
 
  2  
Reply Tue 4 Feb, 2014 05:08 pm
@Wilso,
That's not what IGM said at all. Believe what you want.
Frank Apisa
 
  1  
Reply Tue 4 Feb, 2014 05:11 pm
@IRFRANK,
IRFRANK wrote:

That's not what IGM said at all. Believe what you want.


What Wilso said captures what igm said...and has been saying all along...

...a lot better than your disagreement with Wilso, Frank.

Captures is much, much better!
 

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