3
   

Saddam Hussein calls for regime change in the U.S.

 
 
Reply Fri 2 Apr, 2004 01:54 am
*An old old post I made on another site. Blame Bill for reminding me to archive it on A2K.

Saddam Hussein calls for regime change in the U.S.

Citing "regional security concerns" Saddam Hussein called for regime change in the United
States. "We can't allow nations that are hostile to Iraq to stockpile weapons of mass
destruction," he said in a rare interview, "the United States is clearly a threat to Iraq
and the Iraqi way of life and doing nothing about it is not an option."

Saddam indicated that he was not likely to seek a U.N. mandate for his stated goals as the
U.S. is likely to veto the motion. He expressed remorse and said, "I'd like to include the
United Nations but only if they are a means to this end, if they intend to turn a blind
eye to the threat that the U.S. presents to global stability then we'll have to do it
alone. We will consult with our allies and I haven't made up my mind yet but this is of
such grave importance that we can't afford to sit on our hands and hope the threat will
not materialize. It's time for Iraq to show leadership, sometimes doing the right thing is
lonely but this is something that I insist needs to be done."

When asked if meddling in the affairs of a sovereign state would set a bad precedent for
militaristic civilizations everywhere Saddam replied, "I know that some very intelligent
people have recently vociferated on this issue and believe me I'm absorbing all of it, I
think the debate is a healthy part of the decision making process."

In regard to the hypocrisy of attacking another nation for possession of weapons of mass
destruction while actively seeking his own he replied, "the United States is the country
with the most weapons of mass destruction on earth and we all know it is an evil nation
that is the only country on earth to have used the nuclear bomb. Freedom loving nations
everywhere should clearly recognize the threat this poses to our way of life. America has
missiles that can reach Paris, London or Baghdad. This is a threat to all nations. You are
either with us or against us but terrorism in all its forms needs to be fought, both state
terrorism or individual."

The White House responded by inviting Iraqi leaders to inspect the alleged nuclear silos
and accepted "in principle" the proposal to send U.N. arms inspectors to the U.S. "as long
as they don't come here to spy and drag their feet for years we have no objection to
inspections. Everybody in the world should know that there are no weapons of mass
destruction in America, we have nothing to hide."

While the war drums grew louder nations across the globe expressed their discontent with
the aggressive aims of the Iraqi leader. The Canadians released a statement today stating,
"while we agree that President Shrub needs to be replaced we are worried about the manner
in which Saddam intends to do this, we are particularly concerned with Saddam's demand
that all Americans grow out a mustache, clearly he can't expect women to comply."

The German Chancellor were more outspoken in his criticism. Germany willingly backed the
war on terrorism, Schroedad said, because "the security of our partners is also our
security. But we say this with equal self-confidence," Schroeder added. "We're not
available for adventures, and the time for chequebook diplomacy is over once and for all.
The policy of deterrence has worked well and America has been rehabilitating nicely, they
haven't dropped an atomic bomb in years. As it stands Shrub has plenty of incentive not to
use his weapons, but if he is attacked he will not have anything to lose and might try to
launch missiles at Australia again. This time I don't think we will be able to make
Australia exercise restraint. And I reject Anthony Witch's comments to the effect that
America is a real and unique threat, England doesn't speak for the European Union." This
was perceived to have been about Witch's earlier comments that "Iraq shouldn't have to
face this threat alone."

German Foreign Minister Joshua Fisher, compared Iraq's decision
to that of the United States when it was contemplating war in
Vietnam. "I urgently advise thinking things through," he said in
an interview published Wednesday by the Mittelbayrische Zeitung
daily. "In Iraq itself, this is being viewed as the riskiest
decision since the Iran-Iraq war. In any case preemptive action
is just a euphemism for unprovoked military action"

Iraq expressed its regret about the German chancellor's remarks
in a ministerial communiqué that did not name Gerrard Schroedad.
www.Able2Know.com was able to obtain a copy of the letter which
confirmed speculation that Iraq had played the Holocaust card in
addition to threatening to block further I.M.F. loans to Germany
and that the recent German silence on the "American Question" was
indeed a decision on their part to lay low for a few more
decades.

Iraq at the same time fell under heavy criticism for remarks
attributed to Saddam over the weekend. He was reported to have
said, "I don't have any qualm with the American people, I like
Americans. I think everyone should own one." White House
spokesman Aziz Flietchman said, "we resent Saddam's remarks,
America is a strong country and just because Iraq is a superpower
doesn't mean they can't be defeated, if the Iraqis come they will
taste bitter defeat in the mother of all battles. and What Mr.
Saddam is saying is baseless," Aziz said. He hasn't provided any
solid evidence to back his allegations." Satellite imagery
revealed that the United States was preparing for war by
bunkering down in urban areas making it difficult for the Iraqi
troops to attack without increased collateral damage.

Protests outside Iraqi embassies raged on as riots broke out and
protestors demanded a halt to "Iraqi unilateralist actions
ranging from pollution to war". Former South African president
Neldad Mandale said he was "appalled at any nation superpower or
small declaring its intent to change the government of another.
If Iraq is allowed to change the government of America then any
country that wishes to install a puppet government in another
country will try to do the same."

Iraq was dealt another blow today when Mexico refused to let Iraq
use its airbases to launch an attack on the U.S. but some Iraqi
generals expressed little concern and said that Iraq doesn't need
them anyway. War now seems to be an inevitability, the question
is when, no longer if.
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Type: Discussion • Score: 3 • Views: 2,315 • Replies: 7
No top replies

 
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Sat 3 Apr, 2004 01:45 am
I loved that thread the first time!
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Sat 3 Apr, 2004 01:52 am
Great idea. Was it Stalin who asked how many divisions the pope had?
0 Replies
 
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Sat 3 Apr, 2004 01:55 am
I still think you have a pouch...
0 Replies
 
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Sat 3 Apr, 2004 01:56 am
Hmmm - is it time to revive other Craven threads..............
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Sat 3 Apr, 2004 02:00 am
Did you say pouch or paunch?
0 Replies
 
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Sat 3 Apr, 2004 02:03 am
Pouch.
0 Replies
 
TTH
 
  1  
Reply Tue 8 May, 2007 03:48 am
Re: Saddam Hussein calls for regime change in the U.S.
Craven de Kere wrote:
*An old old post I made on another site. Blame Bill for reminding me to archive it on A2K.

Saddam Hussein calls for regime change in the U.S.

Citing "regional security concerns" Saddam Hussein called for regime change in the United
States. "We can't allow nations that are hostile to Iraq to stockpile weapons of mass
destruction," he said in a rare interview, "the United States is clearly a threat to Iraq
and the Iraqi way of life and doing nothing about it is not an option."

Saddam indicated that he was not likely to seek a U.N. mandate for his stated goals as the
U.S. is likely to veto the motion. He expressed remorse and said, "I'd like to include the
United Nations but only if they are a means to this end, if they intend to turn a blind
eye to the threat that the U.S. presents to global stability then we'll have to do it
alone. We will consult with our allies and I haven't made up my mind yet but this is of
such grave importance that we can't afford to sit on our hands and hope the threat will
not materialize. It's time for Iraq to show leadership, sometimes doing the right thing is
lonely but this is something that I insist needs to be done."

When asked if meddling in the affairs of a sovereign state would set a bad precedent for
militaristic civilizations everywhere Saddam replied, "I know that some very intelligent
people have recently vociferated on this issue and believe me I'm absorbing all of it, I
think the debate is a healthy part of the decision making process."

In regard to the hypocrisy of attacking another nation for possession of weapons of mass
destruction while actively seeking his own he replied, "the United States is the country
with the most weapons of mass destruction on earth and we all know it is an evil nation
that is the only country on earth to have used the nuclear bomb. Freedom loving nations
everywhere should clearly recognize the threat this poses to our way of life. America has
missiles that can reach Paris, London or Baghdad. This is a threat to all nations. You are
either with us or against us but terrorism in all its forms needs to be fought, both state
terrorism or individual."

The White House responded by inviting Iraqi leaders to inspect the alleged nuclear silos
and accepted "in principle" the proposal to send U.N. arms inspectors to the U.S. "as long
as they don't come here to spy and drag their feet for years we have no objection to
inspections. Everybody in the world should know that there are no weapons of mass
destruction in America, we have nothing to hide."

While the war drums grew louder nations across the globe expressed their discontent with
the aggressive aims of the Iraqi leader. The Canadians released a statement today stating,
"while we agree that President Shrub needs to be replaced we are worried about the manner
in which Saddam intends to do this, we are particularly concerned with Saddam's demand
that all Americans grow out a mustache, clearly he can't expect women to comply."

The German Chancellor were more outspoken in his criticism. Germany willingly backed the
war on terrorism, Schroedad said, because "the security of our partners is also our
security. But we say this with equal self-confidence," Schroeder added. "We're not
available for adventures, and the time for chequebook diplomacy is over once and for all.
The policy of deterrence has worked well and America has been rehabilitating nicely, they
haven't dropped an atomic bomb in years. As it stands Shrub has plenty of incentive not to
use his weapons, but if he is attacked he will not have anything to lose and might try to
launch missiles at Australia again. This time I don't think we will be able to make
Australia exercise restraint. And I reject Anthony Witch's comments to the effect that
America is a real and unique threat, England doesn't speak for the European Union." This
was perceived to have been about Witch's earlier comments that "Iraq shouldn't have to
face this threat alone."

German Foreign Minister Joshua Fisher, compared Iraq's decision
to that of the United States when it was contemplating war in
Vietnam. "I urgently advise thinking things through," he said in
an interview published Wednesday by the Mittelbayrische Zeitung
daily. "In Iraq itself, this is being viewed as the riskiest
decision since the Iran-Iraq war. In any case preemptive action
is just a euphemism for unprovoked military action"

Iraq expressed its regret about the German chancellor's remarks
in a ministerial communiqué that did not name Gerrard Schroedad.
www.Able2Know.com was able to obtain a copy of the letter which
confirmed speculation that Iraq had played the Holocaust card in
addition to threatening to block further I.M.F. loans to Germany
and that the recent German silence on the "American Question" was
indeed a decision on their part to lay low for a few more
decades.

Iraq at the same time fell under heavy criticism for remarks
attributed to Saddam over the weekend. He was reported to have
said, "I don't have any qualm with the American people, I like
Americans. I think everyone should own one." White House
spokesman Aziz Flietchman said, "we resent Saddam's remarks,
America is a strong country and just because Iraq is a superpower
doesn't mean they can't be defeated, if the Iraqis come they will
taste bitter defeat in the mother of all battles. and What Mr.
Saddam is saying is baseless," Aziz said. He hasn't provided any
solid evidence to back his allegations." Satellite imagery
revealed that the United States was preparing for war by
bunkering down in urban areas making it difficult for the Iraqi
troops to attack without increased collateral damage.

Protests outside Iraqi embassies raged on as riots broke out and
protestors demanded a halt to "Iraqi unilateralist actions
ranging from pollution to war". Former South African president
Neldad Mandale said he was "appalled at any nation superpower or
small declaring its intent to change the government of another.
If Iraq is allowed to change the government of America then any
country that wishes to install a puppet government in another
country will try to do the same."

Iraq was dealt another blow today when Mexico refused to let Iraq
use its airbases to launch an attack on the U.S. but some Iraqi
generals expressed little concern and said that Iraq doesn't need
them anyway. War now seems to be an inevitability, the question
is when, no longer if.
0 Replies
 
 

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