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Ambiguous Pronouns

 
 
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Fri 12 Jul, 2013 04:29 pm
@ACTPREP,
Quote:
Would you like to see the actual sentence? How would I post it without plagiarizing the authors?


Let me show you how.

==================

As early as 1865, there had been proposals for a New York subway, but that [21] took decades to resolve the many political, technical and financial challenges. The

21. A. NO CHANGE
B. it
C. those
D. DELETE the underlined portion

http://imgur.com/NNGDTLb

===========================

By giving a link to the quoted material, I'm showing that I'm not trying to pass this off as my original thinking, my creation. Plagiarism doesn't preclude quoting others, it only addressing attempting to steal others ideas and works and pretending they are yours.
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Fri 12 Jul, 2013 04:37 pm
@MontereyJack,
Quote:
The original question would in fact take "it". "that" would refer to somethingn earlier in the sentence", which it doesn't, , but "it" is a sort of a conventional way to refer to an entire situation without spelling it out explicitly.


Pretty fair advice, Jack. So there is a difference between 'it' and 'that'.

MontereyJack
 
  1  
Reply Fri 12 Jul, 2013 06:10 pm
@JTT,
LookingSthere is.if you are looking at the act question not his rewrite
0 Replies
 
ACTPREP
 
  1  
Reply Fri 12 Jul, 2013 09:17 pm
@JTT,
I understand now, thank you.
0 Replies
 
MontereyJack
 
  1  
Reply Fri 12 Jul, 2013 11:30 pm
This is the original sentence, apparently from a test prep booklet:

As early as 1865, there had been proposals for a New York subway, but that took decades to resolve the many political, financial, and technical challenges.

This is ACTPREP's rewrite of it:

Quote:
As late as the 1901, there had been proposals for an innovative carriage, but that took centuries to resolve.


The rewrite leaves out the whole clause "the many...technical challenges". Omitting that makes it look like "that" must refer to either "proposals" or "innovative carriage", and doesn't really work well with either, for previously disccussed reasons. If it did in fact refer to either of those, either "it" or "that" would have fit, albeit poorly. With the missing clause it's clear that "that" does not in fact refer to either of them, and "it" fits better, again for reasons previously discussed.

Farmer's in fact right. The redrafted statement has serious problems.
0 Replies
 
MontereyJack
 
  1  
Reply Fri 12 Jul, 2013 11:37 pm
And to clarify, this:
Quote:
@JTT,

LookingSthere is.if you are looking at the act question not his rewrite


should be:

there is, if you are looking at the ACT question, not his rewrite.

I recently got a new phone, and this was the first time I'd tried typing a response on its keyboard, which I discovered is super-sensitive. The potential post kept whizzing off somewhere unknown or turning a corner into the Twilight Zone, or not entering at all. I finally figured that was the best I was gonna get with that keyboard and just posted it warts and all.



0 Replies
 
 

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