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Does the moon rotate (Spin)?

 
 
Reply Wed 26 Jun, 2013 05:28 pm
I am certain that the moon does NOT rotate on its own axis.

I have never understood how, when only one face of the moon is ever visible and that face is gravitationally tide-locked - As if on a chain with the Earth's axis, it is rational for science to teach that 'due to its rotation being in sync with its earth's orbit (27.3 days), it is impossible to observe the moon's rotation.

Huh?

If you tie a string to a ball and swing it around your head.......Does the ball rotate - in and of itself?
No, it does not.

I hope someone can explain why logic favours me and not accepted science, and explain why the contrary is admissible ?

 
raprap
 
  2  
Reply Wed 26 Jun, 2013 06:44 pm
@mark noble,
Think about it a second. The rotation period is the same as the orbital period.

Rap
mark noble
 
  -4  
Reply Wed 26 Jun, 2013 07:15 pm
@raprap,
I thought about it before I posted The OP.
And you are not considering physics.

If an object faces in only one direction it cannot be rotating.
Its face is FIXED on The Earth's axis, albeit rotating around the earth, contrawise and taking nearly a month to do so, its face is FIXED, FIXED, FIXED, ---
As if it were attached by an iron pole - If it rotated (SPUN) it would BREAK the POLE.

Unless it spun on its back with the iron pole up its inverted axis, but, alas, we would see the face rotate daily.

So, it is you who must think...
mesquite
 
  3  
Reply Wed 26 Jun, 2013 10:49 pm
@mark noble,
mark noble wrote:

so, its face is FIXED, FIXED, FIXED, ---
As if it were attached by an iron pole - If it rotated (SPUN) it would BREAK the POLE.

No, the pole would merely point towards the earth as the moon travels around the earth. As raprap said, "The rotation period is the same as the orbital period." If the moon had no rotation, i.e. one side always pointed toward a fixed point in space, then as the moon rotated around the earth it would present a constantly changing face to the earth.
0 Replies
 
laughoutlood
 
  3  
Reply Wed 26 Jun, 2013 11:04 pm
@mark noble,
The motion is perhaps best demonstrated by a simple example.

Take your right index finger and point it towards your right temple from the perpendicular then move your finger around slowly in a clockwise direction.

Take your left index finger and repeat the experiment on your left side this time rotating your finger counter-clockwise all the while keeping the right index finger moving clockwise.

Observe the motion in a mirror.



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tidal_locking





http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/56/Tidal_locking_of_the_Moon_with_the_Earth.gif/300px-Tidal_locking_of_the_Moon_with_the_Earth.gif

mark noble
 
  -2  
Reply Thu 27 Jun, 2013 06:29 am
@laughoutlood,
Your diagram is very misdirecting.

The first moon is clearly attached, at the equator and its visible 'FACE' relentlessly FIXED to our (imaginary) Axial-pole and although rotating around the Earth, Not in and of itself.

Again - Try it yourself with a ball on a string/rod.

I have a ball on a stick, and can rotate it around me and the face is ever the same because it CANNOT rotate in its own right.... or my stick would be severed from it.

The moon's axis is not the same as the Earth's axis, It is an independant object and Does NOT rotate on its axis, but revolves around Earth's.

The Earth does ROTATE THOUGH, as a moon, around the sun and NEVER is one 'FACE' of it locked on the sun, and CANNOT BECAUSE WE ROTATE ON OUR OWN AXIS- If we didn't, then it would.

If the Earth stopped spinning at midday in London - it would always be midday in London - BECAUSE London-midday is now facially-locked at the sun.

Your second diagram suggests an axial-bond (From axle to axle) which will have completely different dynamics to your, prior, axle-facia bond.

It is absurd to suggest a spinning moon.

Now, exchange your ball for an aeroplane, facing right.
Hold your stick at arms length and, ignoring the earth's (You represent the Earth btw) rotation, start to rotate clockwise... You will note - The plane's right side ALWAYS faces you (the Earth) - BECAUSE it is NOT ROTATING on its own axis - it is NOT rotating at all.
Now, view this from many angles - Just a plane flying around and around in circles, NOT Rotating ONCE.
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Thu 27 Jun, 2013 07:58 am
The Moon is in synchronous rotation ("in and of itself"): if you were on its surface you could observe the stars moving across the field of view. It rotates about its axis in about the same time it takes to orbit the Earth. This results in it nearly always keeping the same face turned towards the Earth. The Moon used to rotate at a faster rate, but early in its history, its rotation slowed and became tidally locked in this orientation as a result of frictional effects associated with tidal deformations caused by the Earth.

Mark, what don't you understand about this? Or are you just trolling?
mark noble
 
  -1  
Reply Fri 28 Jun, 2013 07:11 am
@contrex,
The moon does NOT rotate on its own axis.
And, if for one moment only, you can deviate from your predesigned indoctrinated minset, and study Diagram 1 (above), and somehow disprove what I have already proven ....

Are you taking the piss?

How the **** does the moon rotate (around its own axis) When it clearly CANNOT!
This is not debatable... look at the model............PLZ

OK, IMAGINE this..... Diagram 1 - Draw 2 lines, 1 from left side of earth, one from right side beyond the corresponding lunar lft/right.
You now have a pyramid to work with.
The capstone (moon) would have to rotate independently from the base, if it rotated at all - Either clockwise.. or anti''''
BUT it remains a fixed capstone in diagram 1 (Actual Earth/moon union).
This union is ABSOLUTELY dependent on both bodies sharing 1 axis (Earth's) Hence ONLY ONE side of moon is EVER visible From Earth.

Diagram 2 (although APPEARING static from above (spaceview))
would (from Earthview) be rotating, and over every 28 days its entirety would be viewed. It would be moving anticlockwise btw.

Scrap what you've been taught (IT IS WRONG!) and take 5 minutes to figure it out. It isn't hard, and I am really pissed at science accepting without consideration, such an impossibly negligent measurement.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Jun, 2013 07:16 am
That is what is called invincible ignorance.

Quote:
Tidal locking (or captured rotation) occurs when the gravitational gradient makes one side of an astronomical body always face another, an effect known as synchronous rotation. For example, the same side of the Earth's Moon always faces the Earth. A tidally locked body takes just as long to rotate around its own axis as it does to revolve around its partner. This causes one hemisphere constantly to face the partner body. Usually, at any given time only the satellite is tidally locked around the larger body, but if the difference in mass between the two bodies and their physical separation is small, each may be tidally locked to the other, as is the case between Pluto and Charon. This effect is employed to stabilize some artificial satellites.


Source

Guys like you crack me up.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Jun, 2013 07:17 am
I see that someone has already linked that page. Truly, this is invincible ignorance.
maxdancona
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Jun, 2013 07:18 am
@mark noble,
Those two diagrams are exactly correct and not misleading at all. If you disagree with this, why don't you propose your own diagram.

The first diagram correctly represents the actual motion of the Earth and Moon. Note that the same side of the Moon (in the diagram) is always facing the Earth.

The second diagram shows what it would look like if the Moon were not spinning. Note that in this diagram the same side of the moon isn't always facing the Earth.

If you aren't able to understand such a clearly correct illustration, then you are hopeless.
mark noble
 
  0  
Reply Fri 28 Jun, 2013 07:22 am
@Setanta,
Maybe it is. But it's yours.
0 Replies
 
mark noble
 
  0  
Reply Fri 28 Jun, 2013 07:31 am
@maxdancona,
IT is YOU who fail to understand that your diagram SUPPORTS what I'm saying.

The moon is rotating around OUR axis and is fixed/glued/cemented/welded in position. IT CANNOT spin, in its own right or it would sever its bond.

IF it spun we would see all sides of it, REGARDLESS of speed or direction of spin..........FFS!
maxdancona
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Jun, 2013 07:36 am
@mark noble,
Which of these two diagrams to you think illustrates the actual relationship between the earth and the moon?
0 Replies
 
maxdancona
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Jun, 2013 07:36 am
@mark noble,
Which of these two diagrams to you think illustrates the actual relationship between the earth and the moon?
Thomas
 
  3  
Reply Fri 28 Jun, 2013 07:36 am
@mark noble,
marknoble wrote:
Does the moon rotate (Spin)?

Yes, it does.

mark noble wrote:
I am certain that the moon does NOT rotate on its own axis.

We all are sometimes certain, but wrong. You are no exception, and this is one of these times.

marknoble wrote:
If you tie a string to a ball and swing it around your head.......Does the ball rotate - in and of itself?
No, it does not.

Yes it does. If there was no friction between the string and the ball, the ball would rotate around you and not around its own axis. That is to say, its orientation relative to the ground would remain the same, and you would get to see all sides of it. That's what "not rotating around its own axis" means. Your problem is not with logic, its that the rest of us speak English while you speak a language that sounds like English, but actually is a private invention of your own.
Thomas
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Jun, 2013 07:37 am
@laughoutlood,
Your diagram is spot on.
mark noble
 
  0  
Reply Fri 28 Jun, 2013 07:39 am
RIGHT - OBSERVE DIAGRAM 1

Draw a line from centre of Earth through the moon.
Imagine line is long piece of wood.

Moon Rotates on own axis = wood BREAKS!
Moon doesn't rotate on own axis = wood DOESN'T break.

REALLY! ?
This beyond your grasp?
0 Replies
 
mark noble
 
  0  
Reply Fri 28 Jun, 2013 07:44 am
@Thomas,
I agree. Now look at it.... You should note the moon revolves ONLY around the Earth, NOT itself. (Diagram 1 (view is below Earth btw, looking towards Antarctica - moon travels clockwise from Northern (down) view.
0 Replies
 
mark noble
 
  0  
Reply Fri 28 Jun, 2013 07:48 am
@maxdancona,
Diagram 1. Are you not bothering to read my posts?
It is quite clearly put.
0 Replies
 
 

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