11
   

Does the moon rotate (Spin)?

 
 
maxdancona
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Jun, 2013 10:02 am
@mark noble,
A release is not a sudden tug. In a release, the force from the chain drops quickly to zero. And no, a hammer is not equivalent to a javelin. A hammer throw is exactly the situation we are discussion-- a weight on a chain being spun around in a circular motion.

But answer my question. A hammer is being spun around a thrower's head. Then it is released. The instant after it is released is the hammer spinning around its own axis?

This is a yes or no question (after you have answered either "yes" or "no" then we can discuss the why).
mark noble
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Jun, 2013 10:12 am
Imagine a frisbee

You hold it at arm length and spin around 360`. You are rotating and the frisbee is rotating with you, but not in its own right or on its OWN axis.
Now, put it on the ground.
IS IT SPINNING?
NO.

Now balance a spinning jenny on your palm, spin it, spin (you) 360`
It is spinning in its own right and on its own axis.
Now, put it on the ground.
IS IT SPINNING?
YES.

So, exp 1 accounts for an object that relies solely on an axial hub for its revolutions (NOT its own), always face-forward and ATTACHED by its face to a central hub.

exp 2 describes 'Spinning objects' which ACTUALLY spin and make visible their entire surface area over the course of their rotation on their OWN axis. Regardless as to duration of spin.

maxdancona
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Jun, 2013 10:17 am
@mark noble,
You are not answering my question, which is really a very simple question.

A person spins a weight (i.e. a hammer) on a chain and then releases it. The instant after it is released is it spinning around its own axis? I am not talking about frisbees or jennies. I am talking about the simplest of examples... a weight on a chain.

Please answer the question yes or no and stop trying to weasel out. When a weight on a chain is spun around and then released, is it spinning about its own axis the moment after it is released?

Yes or no?
mark noble
 
  0  
Reply Fri 28 Jun, 2013 10:24 am
@maxdancona,
Firstly, setting conditions on my reply is utter bollux.
I'll reply under my own conditions.

There is tug upon release and it can fk your arm up, trust me.
Unless the release is at its optimum, or thereabouts.

So, what kind of release, and what are the relative environmental factors you apply?
0 Replies
 
mark noble
 
  0  
Reply Fri 28 Jun, 2013 10:31 am
@maxdancona,
Stop attempting to insult my integrity (Weasel), Shitbreath, I don't have any.

Would spinning this hammer in a vertical loop alter your equation?
maxdancona
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Jun, 2013 10:34 am
@mark noble,
You still haven't answered my yes or no question. But I will answer yours.

The answer is: No.

Spinning the hammer in a vertical loop would not affect the fact that it continues to spin about its own axis after it is released.

Now can you answer mine?
mark noble
 
  0  
Reply Fri 28 Jun, 2013 10:59 am
@maxdancona,
The angle at exit will determine the spin and momentum of hammer.
So the hammer may or may not spin on its own axis due to its causal trajectory origin.

I'd ask why the release process was so important to you, but it serves no purpose.

I am standing up, feet facing Earth, and now, like the moon, am an extension of the earth.... 1 day passes.... I am in the same spot having revolved around the Earth's axis.

I HAVE NOT spun on my OWN axis..... It would be a NOTICABLE 360` turn, I assure you.
spendius
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Jun, 2013 11:05 am
@mark noble,
You might be in the same spot taking your bearings from your sofa and the microwave but you will be displced in space by about 1.6 million miles. Assuming the galaxy is stationary. Which it isn't.
mark noble
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Jun, 2013 11:11 am
@spendius,
I agree, but so will the moon and earth.
So I'll check out leo falling (Earth rising in conjunction with) behind our rigid moon.
0 Replies
 
maxdancona
 
  2  
Reply Fri 28 Jun, 2013 11:17 am
@spendius,
Also in 12 hours, your head will be pointing in a completely different direction than it is now (assuming you are not standing on one of the Earth's poles).

In a day, you absolutely spin on your own axis.
0 Replies
 
maxdancona
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Jun, 2013 11:29 am
I can prove that you are turning about your axis.

Early morning, at sunrise. Take a look at where the sun is compared you your body. If you point your finger at the sun, your arm will be more or less horizontal.

Then go out at noon and face the same direction. Now if you point at the sun, your arm will be more or less vertical (straight up).

Then go out at sunset and face the same direction. Now if you point at the sun, your arm will be the opposite direction then it was at sunrise.

If you went out at midnight and pointed to the sun (which will be difficult since you won't be able to see it), you will be pointing down.

So during the day (assuming you are pointing east) the sun will start out at your front, go to above your head, then go behind your back, and then go under your feet.

You understand that it isn't the Sun that is moving around you during the course of a day, right? Quite the contrary, it is you who are spinning around once every 24 hours.
mark noble
 
  0  
Reply Fri 28 Jun, 2013 11:34 am
In diagram 1, the moon is tidelocked to, and facing THE Earth!

In diagram 2, the moon is tidelocked to, and facing THE sun!

NOW clever fkr, is the moon in DGM 2 spinning......seeing as its NOW orbit is THE sun, albeit yearly?

KEEP IN MIND !!! DGM 2 is now identical to diagram 1, but on a solar-scale model.

SO EITHER THEY ARE BOTH SPINNING OR NEITHER ARE???
0 Replies
 
mark noble
 
  0  
Reply Fri 28 Jun, 2013 11:41 am
@maxdancona,
What?
The Earth is spinning???

Be serious. Remarks like that make me pity you.

I am not chained/tidelocked to the fkn sun, am I?
maxdancona
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Jun, 2013 11:51 am
@mark noble,
If The Earth is spinning, and you are on the Earth, you are spinning too.

This is why sometimes your head is pointing toward the Sun, and other times of the day your feet are pointing toward the Sun.
mark noble
 
  -1  
Reply Fri 28 Jun, 2013 12:01 pm
@maxdancona,
Idiot...

Read 2 posts back.
Is moon spinning in diagram 2?
DrewDad
 
  6  
Reply Fri 28 Jun, 2013 12:06 pm
@mark noble,
If I lift my middle finger in your direction, it's not really my finger lifting, but rather the rest of the universe lowering.
mark noble
 
  0  
Reply Fri 28 Jun, 2013 12:21 pm
@DrewDad,
Bet your audience adores you fella.
0 Replies
 
spendius
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Jun, 2013 01:14 pm
@DrewDad,
Quote:
If I lift my middle finger in your direction, it's not really my finger lifting, but rather the rest of the universe lowering.


That might be construed as serious misogyny assuming your finger has no special qualities regarding organ liftings.

What about shirts? They are part of the universe.
0 Replies
 
contrex
 
  2  
Reply Fri 28 Jun, 2013 02:02 pm
Come on guys, wake up. What Mark Noble has been doing here is a classic troll.

Thomas
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Jun, 2013 02:27 pm
@mark noble,
mark noble wrote:
So, is my fist rotating in/of itself?

Yes. If the orientation of your fist in space changes, it's rotating. If it doesn't, it isn't.

Have you thought about the question I asked you earlier? In which of the two diagramswould an object nailed to the Moon feel a greater centrifugal force?
0 Replies
 
 

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