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THE DINGBAT HAS LEFT THE BUILDING

 
 
Setanta
 
Reply Sat 1 Jun, 2013 04:06 pm
Jean Stapleton, a veteran actor whose most prominent role was as Edith Bunker on the sit-com All in the Family, has died at the age of 90.

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Type: Discussion • Score: 7 • Views: 1,382 • Replies: 19
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edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Sat 1 Jun, 2013 04:14 pm
I liked her a lot. RIP
Ceili
 
  1  
Reply Sat 1 Jun, 2013 04:17 pm
@edgarblythe,
Me too. Brilliant actress.
0 Replies
 
firefly
 
  2  
Reply Sun 2 Jun, 2013 07:54 am
She was absolutely perfect as Edith Bunker. A brilliant comedic actress who created a character who is indelibly stamped in our memory.

I remember when the character of Edith died, and how I cried during the episodes dealing with that sad storyline and Archie's grief. I think I did my mourning for her then. Now I remember Stapleton with a smile, and much gratitude for the enjoyment she brought me with her performances.

boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Sun 2 Jun, 2013 10:33 am
Do you remember that episode where Edith was sexually assaulted on her birthday.

Oh man. That was heavy.

All In The Family broke ground on so many topics, it's influence should never be underestimated. She was just too perfect as Edith.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Sun 2 Jun, 2013 10:35 am
I was intrigued by her performance in Michael, with John Travolta, also.
0 Replies
 
Moment-in-Time
 
  1  
Reply Sun 2 Jun, 2013 10:51 am
@firefly,
Quote:

I remember when the character of Edith died, and how I cried during the episodes dealing with that sad storyline and Archie's grief. I think I did my mourning for her then.


I recall that episode. Edith's character portrayed a very impressionable human being, more in tune with human suffering than the average individual. I recall one episode where Edith was working in a nursing home and became friendly with a woman who was sick with cancer. The patient was tired of living, tired of the pain and she asked Edith to hold her hand while she passed away instead of calling the doctors in. Edith did just that.....held the dying woman's hand until it was over. Of course there was much anger because Edith did not call for the doctors when she saw the woman was expiring; however, in the eyes of the dead patient's daughter, Edith was vindicated, because she had been with her mother in her last moments....held her hand...offering her emotional support, and the daughter was not available for her mother.
0 Replies
 
Roberta
 
  1  
Reply Sun 2 Jun, 2013 11:22 am
Saddened to hear this. Stapleton was a fine actress. Edith Bunker was a brilliant characterization of a not very bright but a very good person.

RIP, Jean.
0 Replies
 
firefly
 
  1  
Reply Sun 2 Jun, 2013 11:33 am
Stapleton also starred as Eleanor Roosevelt, in the TV film, Eleanor, First Lady of the World.
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Foofie
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Jun, 2013 01:34 pm
Let's be honest, at that point in time, and earlier, women were supposed to hide their intelligence, and if they acted "feminine" by acting confused it was considered funny. From Lucy to Gracie the laugh track told us to find a confused woman funny and that made the male ego comfortable. In my opinion, it really wasn't much different than laughing at Amos 'N Andy, or Mrs. Goldberg in that other sitcom, or for that matter the 1950's sitcom of the Norwegian family, "I Remember Mama."

It seems to me that before we are not "threatened" by some other group, we have to go through a "stage" of seeing that group as "humorous," a la Woody Allen and his portrayal of the urban neurotic Jew.

Sorry, to analyze this thread on a less than superficial level, but that's what I do with the brain that A2k blessed me with (now that's funny).
roger
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Jun, 2013 02:03 pm
@Foofie,
I think you're right.

I also Remember Mama, by the way.
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edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Jun, 2013 02:33 pm
We also laughed at Archie Bunker, Chester Riley, and Ralph Kramden, to name a few men. It wasn't restricted by race or gender.
roger
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Jun, 2013 03:18 pm
@edgarblythe,
So much so that I don't recall ever having heard Riley's first name before.
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Jun, 2013 03:35 pm
@roger,
Chester A. Riley. He was always in trouble until his wife bailed him out.
Foofie
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Jun, 2013 09:45 am
@edgarblythe,
edgarblythe wrote:

We also laughed at Archie Bunker, Chester Riley, and Ralph Kramden, to name a few men. It wasn't restricted by race or gender.


True; however, there always seemed to be the dichotomy of one gender being the proverbial clown. In Father Knows Best, in my opinion, it was the children that were doing the silly/confused/humorous things. The parents were usually the keepers of the correct way, I believe.

But, I do believe that society was telling women back then, in subtle ways, to hide their intelligence. Perhaps, because many a young man would not be attracted to a too smart young lady. And, I am not talking about a nerdy image; just smart.

By the way, I think the audience knew that Ralph Kramden's schtick was just that, and he was Kramden for the benefit of the audience. Archie Bunker, and Chester Riley just annoyed me, since their prejudices or ignorance was quite real to me, in my opinion. They just reminded me of the society that lived in a bubble of popular notions.
0 Replies
 
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Jun, 2013 10:25 am
@edgarblythe,
Odd connection...but Jackie Gleason was the first actor to portray Chester A. Riley. I never saw a single episode with him in it. (flopped). William Bendix did such a good job.

But I agree...annoying and bad examples of '50s-mentality...caveman mentality.
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Jun, 2013 12:36 pm
@Ragman,
Yes, I remember Gleason was Riley at first. Archie Bunker was what he was as much because of Carroll O'Conner as any other reason. Imagine if Mickey Rooney, who had the first opportunity to play the part, had gotten it. Unimagineable, but almost real.
Finn dAbuzz
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Jun, 2013 07:52 pm
@edgarblythe,
Rooney would have been great in the role.

If you want to see his acting skills watch The Black Stallion.
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Jun, 2013 07:59 pm
@Finn dAbuzz,
Rooney was one of the best actors I could name. I admire many of his roles. But, Carroll O'Conner developed that character in a way I don't think Rooney could have. It's the role he was born for.
Finn dAbuzz
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Jun, 2013 08:17 pm
@edgarblythe,
Well, it certainly would have been different, but I think that Rooney, in his own way, could have owned the character the way O'Connor did.

It was a plum of a role for any character actor (which BTW, I think are the best actors)
0 Replies
 
 

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