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Physics of the Biblical Flood

 
 
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Thu 2 May, 2013 04:48 am
@farmerman,
Quote:
A team of geologists from Britain have pinpointed the exact quarry that Stonehenge's innermost circle of rocks came from. It's the first time that a precise source has been found for any of the stones at the prehistoric monument.



Robert Ixer of the University of Leicester and Richard Bevins of the National Museum of Wales painstakingly identified samples from various rock outcrops in Pembrokeshire, Wales.

For nine months the pair used petrography -- the study of mineral content and textural relationships within rocks -- to find the origins of Stonehenge's rhyolite debitage stones. These spotted dolerites or bluestones form the inner circle and inner horseshoe of the site.

They found the culprit on a 65-metre-long outcropping called Craig Rhos-y-Felin, near Pont Saeson in north Pembrokeshire. It lies approximately 160 miles from the Stonehenge site.


http://www.wired.co.uk/news/archive/2011-12/19/stonehenge-rocks

If you visit Henge they give you a set of earphones so you can listen to a guide on everything. The shop has loads of books and posters along with the usual tourist crap. I just live about twenty odd miles from there, so if you're planning a visit I could show you around.

When I was a kid you could still climb all over the stones, not any more, unless you're a druid and it's a solstice or equinox.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Thu 2 May, 2013 04:58 am
@izzythepush,
I can see that its a Brit analyses. You guys keep insisting on using "dolerite" as a real word . We call that "diabase" >I cant understand the two senetnces about "Rhyolite " an dolerite" since these are two very different rocks. Maybe the writers werent savvy enough to distingusih the differences given them and assumed they were talking about the same stuff.

Ive always meant to view the Henge (and the chalk cliffs). when I worked in UK I never had time cause I was always running between Dublin, Manchester and Edinburgh
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Thu 2 May, 2013 08:26 am
@farmerman,
A few years ago we had a Spanish exchange student staying. On her day 'off,' with host families we managed to do Stonehenge, Cheddar Gorge and Glastonbury.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Thu 2 May, 2013 10:22 am
@farmerman,
That the bluestones came from Wales has been know for quite a while, as long ago as when i was in university. Although the link above is much more specific, it has been known for a very long time that the bluestone came from Wales because of the feldspar in the rock. There's a joker named Bernard Cornwell who is a very successful novelist, who wrote a novel about stonhenge a little more than a decade ago . He's one of these writers of historical novels who puts a brief notice at the end of every book to say what parts are historical fact. Well he wrote four novels about the American civil war, and i read the first one. It was utter crap--i didn't bother about the next three. When i read the stonehenge novel i wondered just how accurate he really was, especially as he claimed that the Amesbury Archer was murdered--not just in the text of the novel but in the historical notice at the end. I was pretty sure that couldn't be true--too many grave goods for a murder victim buried to hide the evidence. Why would you murder someone, and then bury them with things like copper knives, which were worth more than gold to bronze age people? So over the years, i have been reading where and when i can. That the bluestone at stone henge was from Wales has been known for a long time, specifically where and how it got there hasn't been known.

There was a long hiatus of new information, but now the Amesbury Archer and the Boscombe Bowmen were all found in this century. There has been a dramatic growth in careful archaeology there in the last 10 to 15 years. When the Amesbury Archer was dug up, the press dubbed him the "King of Sronehenge" (it was a rich burial), and there wa also much speculation, on no very good basis at all, that he was murdered. Cornwell seems to have gone for the dramatic angle, and perhaps relied on his reputation to pull it off. His novels are entertaining, but the historical accuracy is, i think, rarely what he claims.

EDIT: Until i saw the linked material above, i did not know that the specific quarry had been identified. That the stones came from Wales has been known as long ago as the 1960s when i was in university.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Thu 2 May, 2013 10:41 am
OK, Herbert Thomas identitied the bluestones as being of Welsh origin in 1922. In searching for this information, i came across this article at Wales Online which denies that the stones are Preseli bluestone. The article is badly written and the author seems to have an ax to grind . . . with someone. My historiographic instincts are that this guy is a dubious source. As you read through the article, it becomes clear that he doesn't like Thomas, and that he wants to claim that all the bluestones were erratics. I find that difficult to buy because a glacier which would have deposited them in Wiltshire would have left eskers and morraines which just aren't there.

Oh well, geology ain't my field, and i can only say that i've always read that the stones came form Wales, and can be identified by the feldspar content.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Thu 2 May, 2013 04:23 pm
@Setanta,
Fascinting. This is a story that Ive totally missed. The geology would be quite simply proven. A thin section (a 30 micron slice) of each Sarsen should be made and te mineralogy compared
IF the rocks were glacial erratics, their optical chemistry should be somewhat different (mostly by the temperatures of the plagioclase feldspars).
Every plagioclase that makes up igneous rocks (other than granite and diorite) has a specific "striping" pattern in the plagioclases as they are rotated under a polarized light microscope. These strpes can be mathematically measured like tree rings and can record the temperatures ,chemistry and similarity to the rocks from the plains or the mountains. SInce the rocks are uniquely the same (that much I know), its kind of hard to Not believe the "far away" quarry story against the random "erratic in the field " tale.

Ive neither a dog, nor a buck, in the fight but I could settle it damn quick if someone were to send me 10 K, a plane ticket , and a govt permit to collect teeny hunks of each Sarsen. (Like thats gonna happen without a fight)
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Thu 2 May, 2013 06:02 pm
@farmerman,
I think it's already settled, established wisdom has it that the stones were transported from Wales to Amesbury, **** all to do with glaciation, that's Cornwall/Devon.

There's **** loads of standing stones all over the shop over here.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Thu 2 May, 2013 06:29 pm
@izzythepush,
Does that mean that someone already has done these "thin section" comparisons that Ive proposed? Im sorta amazed if they hadnt. (I coulda used a quick trip to Britland) And if the guy who doesnt buy the story because of hizzown pet theory, well plagioclase fingerprints dont lie.ESpecially if there was some good chains of custody on the samples.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Thu 2 May, 2013 06:45 pm
@farmerman,
If you look at the "stripes" on the plagioclase crystals you can see the pattern that develops in whats known as a polysynthetic twin crystal" that means that , when the thin section is rotated to its angle showing maximum contrast between the "barcodes" that angle is unique to the chemistry , and the chenistry is like a fingerprint of the provenance. Also the pattern of the stripes is unique to the specimens ocation also.
We will use aa computer radius counter to provide a numerical listing of the crystals stripe thicknesses amd these can be compared fom site to site to get a "Match" Its often used in forensic geology where bits of sand are attached to a moved body or in a car tire and the
investigators want to know where the victim was when killed or the
car had been.
      http://geology.isu.edu/geostac/Field_Exercise/Cassia_mtns/images/plagtwins.jpg



0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Thu 2 May, 2013 07:03 pm
Stonehenge is a human cultural black hole. It sucks people in, and even those who are not conventionally religious act as though it were "sacred." The so-called "Druids" in England are derived from some pretty dubious "research" which began in the 18th century. Most 'Neo-Druids" of today are really the followers of a retired post office employee who made it up at home in the 1960s.

But what is truly idiotic about it is that there were no Druids in the island at the time Stonehenge was built. It is probable from the evidence of aging of stones which had fallen that the site had been abandoned by the time Druids arrived. When the real, old-time, honest-t0-god Druids did arrive, they did not use the site. Druids did not used man-made structures in their rituals, they worshipped in groups, if at all, in groves of trees. So the entire "Druid" bullshit which revolves around Stonehenge today is just that--bullshit.

Those are the clowns who have retarded archaeology (and probably geological studies) at the site for generations with the phony claims about a holy site.
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Fri 3 May, 2013 01:20 am
@farmerman,
farmerman wrote:

Does that mean that someone already has done these "thin section" comparisons that Ive proposed? Im sorta amazed if they hadnt.


I don't exactly what tests they've carried out, but I'm sure they've done a thorough job.
qspacer1
 
  0  
Reply Fri 3 May, 2013 02:32 am
Hi everyone,

I've read your replies to my last post. Thanks god I'm busy with work so it may take a few more days until I manage to make the time to properly reply.

Roi Lotan Glazer
The Physics of The Biblical Flood
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 3 May, 2013 04:29 am
@izzythepush,
I was toodling around the web and dug up several good reourcs about the lithic "fingerprints" of the Sarsens and other rocks. They used fracture analyses , thin section petrography, and nergy dispersive x ray as well as putting together a fairly clear aerial phooto log of the possible paths between "Woodhenge" and Stonehenge as well as river routes and other sites and evidence from the Plain.




farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 3 May, 2013 04:31 am
@qspacer1,
Dont feel like you are being pummeled, we normlly like to get into spirited discussions when it comes to things like evolution, history, art, and Western style breakfasts.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  2  
Reply Fri 3 May, 2013 05:08 am
@farmerman,
The river routes are very important. I don't memember the names now, but it would have possible to transport the bluestones a short distance to the Severn, the cross the narrow end of the Severn Sea, then up-river to a point within a few miles of what is now called the Avon. From the Avon they could come to a point within a few hundred yards of the building site.

The guy who was ranting at Wales Online really had some bizarre attitude problem. There were hundreds of examples of monumental structures built all over the world using no more sophisticated technology than that possessed by the beaker culture of 5000 ybp.
izzythepush
 
  0  
Reply Fri 3 May, 2013 06:17 am
@Setanta,
There's four different river Avons in England alone.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 3 May, 2013 07:26 am
@Setanta,
there have been several "Paleoengineering" projects to try to determine how several big projects were accomplished by ancient peoples. The Moai were moved using rollers and the missing trees in Easter Island bear testament to the "roller sleds" concept. They did a similar BBC thing on the stones of stonhenge and, while it was speculative, it was fairly supported by some evidence and trces of paths nd road remains that how up on aerial photos where they screwed with the reflection spectra.

These were the same tricks that helped Re-discover Ur and its radiating rod patterns.
Supposedly theres a similar ork in progress on the nazca Plains to see the patterns by which the Nazca Lines were installed.

Id like to see some detailed remote sensing analyses of the serpentine "Mounds" in Ohio .
farmerman
 
  2  
Reply Fri 3 May, 2013 07:29 am
@izzythepush,
Is that my fault? You guys are too lazy to come up with river names so you deserve hat you get.

izzythepush
 
  0  
Reply Fri 3 May, 2013 07:59 am
@farmerman,
It is your fault, most definitely.
0 Replies
 
mark noble
 
  1  
Reply Fri 3 May, 2013 08:06 am
The english translation into kj is innacurate.
The original/as found in any decent concordance = World/land/Country/Area.....

So the whole (one of the above) is now available for your research.
When a primitive mind, in a primitive time finds a fossilised fish up a mountain, it puts 8+3 together and comes up with 'primitive-plausibility'
The med-basin was a desert until the Atlantic poured over the Atlan-Ridge and, over 2-300 yrs filled it to current capacity.
Any observing this would have determined 'divine-intervention' seeing as walking upright and cave-dwelling were futuristic ideals of the day.
Every creature on land and in sea was NEVER 'Killed' by a global-flood though. There have been mass extinctions - Permean whacked 95% of all life on Earth, but was atmospheric in origin: anyway I'm bored now - cya.
 

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