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Transient fields

 
 
Reply Tue 19 Jan, 2016 10:09 pm
Say that a massive, charged particle is created by an accelerator collision. Its electric field expands at the speed of light. If it is short lived it may cease to exist before its elecric field can reach other charged particle masses.

(1) Does the electric field simultaneously cease to exist (and what does "simultaneously" mean relativistically speaking), or does it continue propagating? (My understanding is that the field bosons are virtual.)

(2) What happens to the gravitational field associated with the particle mass?

(3) Is it possible to use the field/mass time differential to generate anti-gravity effects?
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McGentrix
 
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Reply Tue 19 Jan, 2016 10:44 pm
@puzzledperson,
I can probably tell you in 4 years...
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oralloy
 
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Reply Tue 19 Jan, 2016 11:19 pm
@puzzledperson,
puzzledperson wrote:
(1) Does the electric field simultaneously cease to exist (and what does "simultaneously" mean relativistically speaking), or does it continue propagating? (My understanding is that the field bosons are virtual.)

I would think that the field would simultaneously cease to exist, but that relativisticly speaking, news of that non-existence would have to propagate out at the speed of light (with news of the previous existence still propagating out at the speed of light ahead of that), which would allow the particle to influence other particles despite its short lifespan.


puzzledperson wrote:
(2) What happens to the gravitational field associated with the particle mass?

I'd think the same as the electric field.


puzzledperson wrote:
(3) Is it possible to use the field/mass time differential to generate anti-gravity effects?

I doubt it.
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puzzledperson
 
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Reply Wed 20 Jan, 2016 12:06 am
@puzzledperson,
(3) Is it possible to use the field/mass time differential to generate anti-gravity effects?

A clarification:

Assume that a quantum theory of gravity consistent with Special Relativity exists, such that the gravitational force is transmitted by gauge bosons (gravitons) moving at the speed of light. The short-lived particle mass which generates the graviton field is necessarily moving slower than light. Reference frames exist for which the graviton field continues to exist after the particle mass ceases to exist. Since the graviton field in the absence of the particle mass represents an asymmetry and a violation of the conservation of energy (?) such a reference frame should experience an offsetting change in mass, somewhere. (That at least is the idea.)

Of course, with a field of virtual particles, it gets tricky, since theoretically they already "borrow" energy by exploiting the Heisenberg uncertainty relation between energy and time.
puzzledperson
 
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Reply Wed 20 Jan, 2016 12:54 am
@puzzledperson,
P.S. The particle doesn't have to be intrinsically short-lived: for example, any charged particle/anti-particle pair could annihilate each other, converting all mass to radiative energy; meanwhile their graviton fields exist for some (or all) reference frame(s). This creates the required asymmetry while preserving conservation of electric charge (net neutral charge before and after).

Incidentally, the asymmetry which (hypothetically) gives rise to anti-gravity effects might not involve disappearing mass at all; in fact energy has mass under the E=mc^2 formula so I'm not even sure that would work. But obviously if a particle mass ceases to exist while the boson field it generates doesn't, a symmetry violation of some sort exists, and the only remedy might be a compensating effect corresponding to "anti-gravity".
puzzledperson
 
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Reply Wed 20 Jan, 2016 01:26 am
@puzzledperson,
P.P.S. One could look at it this way: if a graviton field exists without a corresponding mass, then the only remedy is the generation of an equal but opposite field consisting of anti-gravitons, or at least of some phenomenon equivalent to this.

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