6
   

BICEP and now LIGO discover gravity waves

 
 
Reply Fri 12 Feb, 2016 10:27 am
The Quantum world and the world of classical physics slowly come together, as another finding , predicted by Einstein, display the evidence for gravity waves. (Now comes the prove it work as scientists must repeat the discovery ).

Yeaterday was a big day in all natural and physical sciences. (Now all I gotta do is figure out what "G" really is)
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Type: Discussion • Score: 6 • Views: 3,044 • Replies: 20
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Lordyaswas
 
  2  
Reply Fri 12 Feb, 2016 11:08 am
@farmerman,
" (Now all I gotta do is figure out what "G" really is)"

You will need a medium sized apple.
fresco
 
  1  
Reply Fri 12 Feb, 2016 11:35 am
@Lordyaswas,
Surely gravy waves had already been observed on the plates of cross-Channel diners!
Lordyaswas
 
  1  
Reply Fri 12 Feb, 2016 11:50 am
@fresco,
I tend to avoid gravy on such crossings, and tend to go for the full English brekky.

I shall try a gravy laden dish next time though, and test your theory.
farmerman
 
  2  
Reply Fri 12 Feb, 2016 12:11 pm
@Lordyaswas,
thats Feldstein's theory of Gravy. Im talking about Einstein's full theory of
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sat 13 Feb, 2016 02:03 pm
@farmerman,
seems noone gives a rodents rump about TIME TRAVEL or the possibility of MULTIPLE DIMENSIONS eh?

Well Ill see you all yesterday when this inks in
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Sat 13 Feb, 2016 02:38 pm
I interested. Just dumber than a board.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sat 13 Feb, 2016 04:57 pm
@edgarblythe,
Newton is brought up to date with a mechanism.
The interesting thing I think about is to try to make up a mind game that helps define what a black hole would look like .

Consider the next steps as the instruments get more powerful. Since the gravitational waves are compressing and deflating "space-time", whats the "prticle" that carries the wave.
Lordyaswas
 
  1  
Reply Sat 13 Feb, 2016 05:30 pm
@farmerman,
The Gallifrey particle.
farmerman
 
  2  
Reply Sat 13 Feb, 2016 05:38 pm
@Lordyaswas,
That sounds like a Ben and Jerry'a Ice Cream flvor.

I CAN see Ben and Jerry with a GRAVITON RIPPLE flavor.
Dark chocolate bits in a rather beige colored ice cream matrix
Lordyaswas
 
  2  
Reply Sat 13 Feb, 2016 05:51 pm
@farmerman,
Bajoran Wormhole followed by a Quadrant of Tarte Tardis.
0 Replies
 
Olivier5
 
  1  
Reply Sun 14 Feb, 2016 03:56 am
@farmerman,
farmerman wrote:
Since the gravitational waves are compressing and deflating "space-time", whats the "prticle" that carries the wave.

None, if Eistein was right. It's a deformation of spacetime, like sound is a deformation of air. There's no particle associated with sound, or is there?
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 14 Feb, 2016 05:12 am
@Olivier5,
Well something has to be carrying the energy? Light has a photon, Is there really a graviton?
Fil Albuquerque
 
  1  
Reply Sun 14 Feb, 2016 05:26 am
@farmerman,
Old question...read about the hypothetical gravitons first time around 20 years ago or so but never got intuitively convinced, unless "gravitons" is somewhat referring to an intrinsic part of the fabric of spacetime itself which didn't seem to be the case they were making for them. One thing springs clear for me in my modest outsider perspective on the matter...4D spacetime does not seem to be the ultimate medium where the "language" of Reality is ultimately written. There must be yet another layer less prone to distortions and messy stuff. Just guessing obviously.
0 Replies
 
Olivier5
 
  1  
Reply Sun 14 Feb, 2016 06:52 am
@farmerman,
From what I understand, gravitational waves are a deformation of space itself. No graviton needed therefore.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 14 Feb, 2016 07:51 am
@Olivier5,
yes thats true, but I think it needs a medium upon which this acts. (Like a photon, except for gravity)

Im not wedded to anything Im just treading water here and too lazy to go hunt up the information>
farmerman
 
  2  
Reply Sun 14 Feb, 2016 07:59 am
@farmerman,
from Geekwire.com

Quote:
Gravitational-wave observatories will provide a whole new way to “see” the universe – to study invisible black holes, to probe the dynamics of a supernova in the midst of an explosion, and to get a better grip on how gravity works.

Kip Thorne, who designed the fictional black hole in the movie “Interstellar,” said a detailed analysis of LIGO’s data could help physicists narrow down their search for the graviton, an as-yet-unobserved particle that’s thought to play a role in mediating the force of gravity.

Scientists expect still more gravitational-wave observatories, such as Italy’s upgraded EGO-Virgo detector and Japan’s KAGRA detector, to bring further discoveries to light. And last year, the European Space Agency launched a mission called LISA Pathfinder that could eventually set the stage for a space-based gravitational-wave observatory.

Thorne wrapped up today’s briefing by providing a big-picture perspective on LIGO’s quest. Just as modern-day historians hail the Renaissance for its impact on art, architecture and music, future historians are likely to hail the current age for its contribution to humanity’s understanding of the universe, he said.

“LIGO is a big part of that,” Thorne said. “I think we should be proud of what we give to our descendants culturally.”
Olivier5
 
  1  
Reply Mon 15 Feb, 2016 11:03 am
@farmerman,
Note the "could"...
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 15 Feb, 2016 11:06 am
@Olivier5,
also"As of yet unobserved particle"... It is a furtive little bastard.
Olivier5
 
  1  
Reply Mon 15 Feb, 2016 11:13 am
@farmerman,
I've read that even if the graviton existed, it could not possibly be detected (too small, too rare)... but that's beyond my sphere of competence.
 

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