JPB
 
  1  
Reply Sat 10 Nov, 2012 08:13 am
Interesting idea from the Washington Post

Quote:
President Obama should ask Romney to present the nation with a bipartisan plan to solve the deficit in the long term while promoting growth in the short term. And Romney should accept.

Romney has impressed Democrats and Republicans alike with his serious demeanor and his intellect. His success as a business leader launched his political career, and he showed in Massachusetts how a Republican can work with Democrats.

...


It would be unfair for Obama to ask Romney to take on the burden of crafting a bipartisan plan on his own. So Obama should also turn to the last president to balance a budget and preside over a booming economy: Bill Clinton.
More
cicerone imposter
 
  2  
Reply Sat 10 Nov, 2012 10:12 am
@JPB,
Yea, Romney should share with "our President" how to create 12-million jobs in this world recession - to save face and do good for our country.

He repeated many times, "I will create 12-million jobs." He can now help our country with his secret on how.
RABEL222
 
  1  
Reply Sat 10 Nov, 2012 11:23 am
@cicerone imposter,
Oh please! I am up to my neck in this 12,000,000 job bs. Just let him slide gently into oblivion.
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Sat 10 Nov, 2012 11:25 am
@RABEL222,
As long as you're still breathing with your head above water....
0 Replies
 
JPB
 
  1  
Reply Sat 10 Nov, 2012 02:13 pm
Grover is taking to the airwaves dangling his threats to tax-raising pledge signers.

Quote:
House Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio) increasingly talks about finding revenue by ending so-called loopholes in the tax code. Boehner has also said he wants to lower rates by fundamentally overhauling the tax code.

As long as Republicans successfully push down tax rates, revenue generated by closing loopholes won’t constitute a pledge violation.

But there could be trouble if Republicans sign off on revenue during the lame-duck session of Congress without a rate reduction — an outcome Norquist says is unlikely.

“It would be a tax increase,” he said.

And that, Norquist says, has big consequences for lawmakers who want to stay in office.

“If you promise you weren’t going to raise taxes and you do, we want to make sure people in your district are aware both that you made the commitment and that you broke it,” he said.

Read more: http://www.politico.com/news/stories/1112/83674.html#ixzz2BqvFyVB3
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Sat 10 Nov, 2012 03:19 pm
@JPB,
They've been lost in the woods for so long, they no longer think they're lost.
A dilemma of humongous proportions; they don't even know they're drowning.
0 Replies
 
JLNobody
 
  3  
Reply Sun 11 Nov, 2012 10:34 pm
@JPB,
Keep in mind that when Grover and Boehner talk about making adjustments in "entitlements" they are using code for sticking it to the poor.
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Sun 11 Nov, 2012 11:06 pm
@JLNobody,
Of coarse they are! They still want to give bigger tax cuts to the rich even though they're not asking for it. These GOP members of congress are sick in the head; they continue to advocate for people who don't need any more tax breaks.

Why are they so screwed up?
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Nov, 2012 06:03 am
@JLNobody,
My thoughts exactly.
0 Replies
 
JPB
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Nov, 2012 07:27 am
Boehner is a politician. Grover Norquist's pledge is a parasite on the political process. Politicians and parasites might be synonyms. It's going to be an interesting 6 weeks.
0 Replies
 
revelette
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Nov, 2012 07:54 am
@JPB,
Why don't people tell Grover to stick it? I mean who does he think he is, its like forget about the pledge of allegiance to United States, its now the pledge of allegiance to Grover. Its ridiculous the amount of power they give that man in the republican party.

Or has it blown itself out?
JPB
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Nov, 2012 08:00 am
@revelette,
Definitely hasn't blown out. He has promised to run a primary candidate against anyone who has signed his pledge and then votes for a tax increase. Most politicians these days see their gig as a career not a stint at pubic service. Grover helps them get elected the first time by bankrolling their candidacy. He only does that if they sign his pledge. Then, if they don't want him bankrolling someone to run against them they will do his bidding.
Setanta
 
  2  
Reply Mon 12 Nov, 2012 08:07 am
Gover doesn't bankroll the candidate, Grover finds people to bankroll the candidate. The question is whether or not he can find people to bankroll a candidate to run aginst someone whom they've already backed two years before. In politics as in so many other areas of life, people's power is based on what others allow to them. If a sufficient number of Republicans have to sign on to a plan to avoid rolling over the cliff, Grover won't be able to get the backers to take them all down in the next election, and he'll become the irrelevancy he should have already become.

Somebody should start discreet, inespensive ads in republican House districts to ask voters if their Representative works for them or Grover Norquist.
JPB
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Nov, 2012 09:11 am
Politico does a pretty good job of mapping out 5 fiscal cliff scenarios.

http://www.politico.com/news/stories/1112/83701.html?hp=f1
0 Replies
 
Miller
 
  -2  
Reply Mon 12 Nov, 2012 09:45 am
Senator Scott Brown of Massachusetts, who recently lost to Eliz. Warren, has it pegged right.

For sure taxes will go up. Money will be quickly generated and then....the Dems will quickly spend all the money. Senator Brown is correct when he says the Dems when near any money act like pigs at the trough.
maxdancona
 
  6  
Reply Mon 12 Nov, 2012 09:49 am
@Miller,
Obviously we taxpayers of Massachusetts disagree with Scott Brown (who recently lost to Eliz. Warren).
revelette
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Nov, 2012 10:53 am
@JPB,
Quote:
at least 55 Republican House incumbents or candidates who signed the pledge — and 24 Republican Senators or hopefuls — lost on Tuesday. Linda McMahon (R-CT), Senator Scott Brown (R-MA), Treasurer Josh Mandel (R-OH), Secretary of State Charles Summers (R-ME), former Gov. Tommy Thompson (R-WI) all signed the pledge and were attacked by their Democrats opponents in face-to-face debates over the issue. All five were defeated in their Senate bids.

State Sen. Tony Strickland (R-CA), Rep. Bob Dold (R-IL), State Sen. Richard Tisei (R-MA), and Rep. Frank Guita (R-NH) were also attacked by their House race opponents in debates for signing the pledge in this campaign or in the past. All four were also defeated.

In fact, of the fifteen-plus House Republican incumbents who apparently lost re-election, every single one had signed Norquist’s pledge.

Norquist’s group spent more than $15 million on independent expenditures. This included hundreds of thousands on ads explicitly defending candidates like Ricky Gill (R-CA) and State Rep. Lee Anderson (R-GA) against criticisms over their having signed the pledge. Both lost.


source
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Nov, 2012 11:44 am
@revelette,
Looks like $$$$ is failing to win votes.
Finn dAbuzz
 
  0  
Reply Mon 12 Nov, 2012 06:09 pm
@maxdancona,
Obviously you do considering that Warren received 100% of the vote
0 Replies
 
Finn dAbuzz
 
  0  
Reply Mon 12 Nov, 2012 06:11 pm
@cicerone imposter,
What? It was a nightmare...Obama didn't win?
0 Replies
 
 

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