28
   

Who do you want to vote for in 2016?

 
 
djjd62
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Nov, 2012 05:57 pm
@Green Witch,
sure, but the myth is so much bigger than the man
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  2  
Reply Wed 7 Nov, 2012 05:58 pm
@Lustig Andrei,
Lustig Andrei wrote:
I have an open mind but I don't intend to even think about 2016 until maybe late 2014.


I'll go along with that. People seem to forever forget the dark horse. Jimmy Carter was a dark horse. Bill Clinton was a dark horse. We have no way of knowing who will come out of the woodwork when they start gearing up for 2016.
0 Replies
 
Thomas
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Nov, 2012 06:21 pm
@Green Witch,
Green Witch wrote:
Who do you want to vote for in 2016?

Elizabeth Warren. No more Mr. Nice President! (I'd like Russ Feingold for vice president, if he's still active. Otherwise Barbara Boxer.)
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Nov, 2012 06:22 pm
No one person interests me all that much now - I'm with that young girl who wanted all the noise to stop. Today that is. By next week I might get interested again.

Hillary is to the right of me, though I don't completely dislike her. I had some trouble with her expressed interest in having Ghaddafi be killed outright.. dare I say it happened ugly. Less expensive than court proceedings, eh. I had that trouble with Obama and Bin Laden too, but was more accepting of it, which I've come to question myself about.

Jill Stein interests me but I both don't know enough and doubt she is electable. I don't know a thing about Elizabeth Warren. I have liked Russ Feingold and I don't think (well, I wouldn't) that 59 is old - but again, haven't read up on him lately.

Reminds me of a line in the teleplay and book by Frederic Raphael years ago called The Glittering Prizes: My dear, the noise.. and the people!
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frederic_Raphael
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Nov, 2012 06:24 pm
Chris Christy looks pretty good right now, but it's still too early to know who the "runners" will be. He seems to be the only "reasonable" conservative who can work both sides of the isle. He'll tell his own party members to ">>>>>>>>>" if they get too far out of line, and he's the only one with guts to do it.
Green Witch
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Nov, 2012 06:52 pm
@ossobuco,
Quote:
I have liked Russ Feingold and I don't think (well, I wouldn't) that 59 is old - but again, haven't read up on him lately.


I don't consider a candidate in their early 60's too old either.
0 Replies
 
jcboy
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Nov, 2012 07:48 pm
@Green Witch,
I'm not sure yet but I will predict it will be a woman!
0 Replies
 
Finn dAbuzz
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Nov, 2012 08:20 pm
The current Democrat model for electoral success (and since it's been quite successful, it's likely to prevail until there is a major defeat) doesn't, for a moment, contemplate a 2016 candidate like Hilary Clinton, and certainly not Joe Biden.

Julian Castro.

Look for him to be named to an Obama cabinet position at some time in the next four years.

He might be able to win a congressional seat in Texas, but he has no chance at Cornyn's come the mid-term elections.

In order for Castro to fulfill the model, he has to have national exposure.

It's possible he can get it as a congressman, but more likely he'll get in as a member of the Obama Administration.

0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  -1  
Reply Wed 7 Nov, 2012 08:58 pm
@Green Witch,
Reagan would be considered, by any sentient being, a first class war criminal.

It must be distressing for Americans to not be able to find a leader that isn't a felon, a war criminal, a terrorist or a combination of all three.
0 Replies
 
snood
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Nov, 2012 10:25 pm
@sozobe,
Quote:
Tammy Baldwin is another longtime fave (first gay AND female president!!) but I don't really know enough about her current policies etc. to back her.


If you don't know a lot about her policies, what makes her a longtime fave?
ehBeth
 
  2  
Reply Wed 7 Nov, 2012 10:34 pm
@sozobe,
sozobe wrote:

Not sure. I think probably younger, 40's to early 50's range.


I think this is an important piece. If the next president is to have two terms, they'll be x + 8 at the end. I don't think they should be 60+ at the end of their term. So max age (from my perspective) at beginning of first term should be less than 52.

Old politicians tend to owe too many people too much stuff.
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Thu 8 Nov, 2012 02:49 am
@cicerone imposter,
cicerone imposter wrote:
Chris Christy looks pretty good right now, but it's still too early to know who the "runners" will be. He seems to be the only "reasonable" conservative who can work both sides of the isle. He'll tell his own party members to ">>>>>>>>>" if they get too far out of line, and he's the only one with guts to do it.
By what reasoning
can Chris Christy be deemed to be conservative ?
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Thu 8 Nov, 2012 03:13 am
@Green Witch,
Green Witch wrote:
Reagan would be considered a moderate liberal by today's GOP.
Reagan was a lot more conservative
than any modern candidate other than Libertarian Senator Dr. Ron Paul,
tho I have heard that remark (qua Reagan) several times.

Reagan 's philosophy was similar to that of Barry Goldwater.

Let 's remember that being conservative means being orthodox
as to the philosophy of the Founders, as set forth in the US Constitution, not varying therefrom.

Being conservative means being like an accurate accountant,
who is un-yielding, refusing to introduce error into his calculations for ANY reason,
regardless of how emotionally appealing it sounds. If he changes his mind
and opts to vary from the rules, then he is no longer a conservative.

Being conservative simply means rigidly applying the rules and playing it straight.





David
0 Replies
 
Finn dAbuzz
 
  1  
Reply Thu 8 Nov, 2012 08:57 am
@cicerone imposter,
cicerone imposter wrote:

Chris Christy looks pretty good right now, but it's still too early to know who the "runners" will be. He seems to be the only "reasonable" conservative who can work both sides of the isle. He'll tell his own party members to ">>>>>>>>>" if they get too far out of line, and he's the only one with guts to do it.


That you consider him a "reasonable" conservative is based entirely on his effusive reaction to the Obama visit and is the reason that his political aspiration for 2016 has diminished considerably.

Liberals don't want a Democrat president who will ride roughshod over their representatives, but they want a Republican candidate who will scold conservatives. It makes sense from your perspective and if the tables were turned, I would want the same thing, but neither you or I or going to get it anytime soon.

0 Replies
 
sozobe
 
  1  
Reply Thu 8 Nov, 2012 09:18 am
@snood,
"Current" is the key word there.

She was a politician in Madison when I lived there, and I sort of knew her (knew people who knew her, probably went to a fundraiser or two that she attended). I liked her a lot in terms of intelligence, views, personality, etc.

It was pretty small-scale at the time though (WI Assembly, just looked it up), and while I liked her and everything I did know about her policy-wise, it wasn't nearly presidential level (foreign policy, etc., etc.)

She was beginning her bid to be a congressperson about when I left, and then just became Senator.
0 Replies
 
tsarstepan
 
  2  
Reply Thu 8 Nov, 2012 10:17 am
@sozobe,
sozobe wrote:

Deval Patrick is another maybe, there are a lot of things I like about him but there are some concerns too, and he's so Obama-esque that might be a little weird. Cory Booker, same.

Cory Booker, Deval Patrick, or Elizabeth Warren would make great vice presidential candidates. But as another poster had said, Elizabeth Warren got her senate seat. Perhaps she should stay there for awhile and do some great stuff in the senate. I believe she could.
0 Replies
 
jcboy
 
  1  
Reply Thu 8 Nov, 2012 10:36 am
Maybe in 2016 Republicans will ignore the small but loud Tea Party and embrace the fact that younger voters are more liberal. Despite his Tea Party support, I can't imagine Marco Rubio won't be in the mix. I really don't see Joe Biden running and Hillary Clinton keeps saying she doesn't want to so the Democratic side is wide open too.
cicerone imposter
 
  3  
Reply Thu 8 Nov, 2012 10:38 am
@jcboy,
Makes sense; the Hispanic voting block is growing, and in four more years, they will be an influence that cannot be denied.
0 Replies
 
sozobe
 
  1  
Reply Thu 8 Nov, 2012 10:39 am
@jcboy,
I don't take Hillary's protestations at face value. That kind of demurral expected at this point and doesn't mean anything. She's still Secretary of State, 2016 is still far off, even if she really wants to run, now would be way too early to give an indication of that.

Which is not to say that she WILL, just that if she says she won't now, that doesn't necessarily mean anything.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Thu 8 Nov, 2012 10:46 am
Just read this one - interesting, Asians voted percentagewise for Obama more than Hispanics did:


http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2012-11-08/asian-voters-send-a-message-to-republicans.html
 

Related Topics

Obama '08? - Discussion by sozobe
Let's get rid of the Electoral College - Discussion by Robert Gentel
McCain's VP: - Discussion by Cycloptichorn
Food Stamp Turkeys - Discussion by H2O MAN
The 2008 Democrat Convention - Discussion by Lash
McCain is blowing his election chances. - Discussion by McGentrix
Snowdon is a dummy - Discussion by cicerone imposter
GAFFNEY: Whose side is Obama on? - Discussion by gungasnake
 
Copyright © 2022 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.09 seconds on 01/22/2022 at 11:21:32