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Lie through your teeth

 
 
Equus
 
Reply Thu 12 Dec, 2002 10:42 am
Is there some way to lie besides lying through your teeth? I suppose so, if you wear dentures. What is the alternative?
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Type: Discussion • Score: 1 • Views: 3,545 • Replies: 20
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cjhsa
 
  1  
Reply Thu 12 Dec, 2002 11:34 am
You can lie through your dictionary.

"That depends upon what the definition of "is" is..."
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patiodog
 
  1  
Reply Thu 12 Dec, 2002 11:41 am
Well, there's talking out your arse.
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jjorge
 
  1  
Reply Thu 12 Dec, 2002 11:47 am
Hm-m-m

I had never given any thought to the expression, 'lying through your teeth' I suppose it must mean lying while maintaining a (deceitful) smile.

If that's the case the other options include: lying with a frown, lying with a sneer, lying with a tear (I've known a couple of women very adept at that) etc.
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patiodog
 
  1  
Reply Thu 12 Dec, 2002 11:48 am
You can lie in print.
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patiodog
 
  1  
Reply Thu 12 Dec, 2002 11:49 am
You can lie in wait.
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Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Thu 12 Dec, 2002 11:50 am
oh, that doggy . . .

http://www.whiteoakdesign.net/shiningwit//main/war3.gif
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patiodog
 
  1  
Reply Thu 12 Dec, 2002 11:55 am
Where's soz? She can lie in sign.
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roger
 
  1  
Reply Thu 12 Dec, 2002 01:35 pm
You can lie like a dog.
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Sugar
 
  1  
Reply Thu 12 Dec, 2002 03:28 pm
Or lie like a rug.
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dupre
 
  1  
Reply Thu 12 Dec, 2002 03:33 pm
You can "lie like a tombstone."

"Used to describe a great liar; the comparison is with the tombstones of old, whose inscriptions often exaggerated the good qualities of those who lay beneath them." (QPB Encyclopedia of Word and Phrase Origins)
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dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Thu 12 Dec, 2002 03:35 pm
I lie low....
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dupre
 
  1  
Reply Thu 12 Dec, 2002 03:36 pm
Or "lie like a butcher's dog."

"Grose, in the 1788 edition of his Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue, tells us this was 'a simile often applied to married men,' who, 'like the butcher's dog' would often 'lie by the beef without touching it.' The humorous expression for involuntary sexual abstinence didn't last until Victorian times, when it might have achieved wider currency." (same source)
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patiodog
 
  1  
Reply Thu 12 Dec, 2002 03:38 pm
"The liar at any rate recognizes that recreation, not instruction, is the aim of conversation, and is a far more civilised being than the blockhead who loudly expresses his disbelief in a story which is told simply for the amusement of the company." - Oscar Wilde
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dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Thu 12 Dec, 2002 03:43 pm
LOL! Trust Oscar!
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Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Thu 12 Dec, 2002 04:18 pm
Ooooo, Shug, nice new avatar . . . uh, ummm, no, no apples thank you . . . got any sammiches?
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Sugar
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Dec, 2002 09:11 am
Thanks Sentanta. I have sammiches - cyanide and arsenic spread with sprouts on a baguette or deadly nightshade with pickled newt tongue on an onion roll.
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Heeven
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Dec, 2002 09:52 am
You can lie to my face
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Heeven
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Dec, 2002 09:53 am
an tell me I'm gawgeous!
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Dec, 2002 09:53 am
Ya forgot the minced wing of bat.
0 Replies
 
 

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