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Business name capitalization

 
 
SarahG
 
Reply Sat 1 Sep, 2012 07:48 am
I have a grammar question the internet has thus far seemed unable or unwilling to answer. When an article ("a," "an," or "the") appears in the middle of a *business* name, should its first letter be capitalized? I'm aware that it should not in the titles of things like books and articles, but does this rule apply to business names as well? It's fairly important, as the business I want to start is a proofreading/copyediting service.

Thanks in advance to anyone who can help.
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Type: Question • Score: 3 • Views: 1,253 • Replies: 9
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JTT
 
  1  
Reply Sat 1 Sep, 2012 08:15 am
@SarahG,
Can you give an example, Sarah?
SarahG
 
  1  
Reply Sat 1 Sep, 2012 10:39 am
@JTT,
Like "Pop The Cork," or "Jump the Gun." Smile
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Sat 1 Sep, 2012 11:00 am
@SarahG,
Quote:
I have a grammar question the internet has thus far seemed unable or unwilling to answer. When an article ("a," "an," or "the") appears in the middle of a *business* name, should its first letter be capitalized? I'm aware that it should not in the titles of things like books and articles, but does this rule apply to business names as well? It's fairly important, as the business I want to start is a proofreading/copyediting service.


Quote:
Like "Pop The Cork," or "Jump the Gun."


This has nothing at all to do with rules of grammar, Sarah. It's all a matter of style which is definitely not determined by grammar rules. We know this because different organizations, NYTimes, Reuters, engineering groups, etc. all have different style manuals.

I'd say that it's your call. After all a name is a name and names are capitalized.

Better, in your business, to not keep advancing all the spurious prescriptions that many of these style manuals have been advancing for years.
dalehileman
 
  1  
Reply Sat 1 Sep, 2012 11:09 am
@JTT,
If the the “The” is first, an actual part of the name, eg “The Daily Show” then it ought to be cap

Otherwise I’d agree with JTT
0 Replies
 
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Sat 1 Sep, 2012 11:13 am
@SarahG,
SarahG wrote:
the business I want to start is a proofreading/copyediting service.


Business names are rule-free in the English speaking world. They can have (or omit) capitals wherever they wish. You should become aware of the difference between grammar and style, and choose (and stick to) a house style appropriate for the type of English readership you envisage. (US, UK, international).

0 Replies
 
SarahG
 
  1  
Reply Mon 3 Sep, 2012 06:02 am
@SarahG,
Thank you all for your input. Obviously I'm new to the proofreading field and still unclear on proper terms and distinctions. I've decided to stick with a lowercase "t."

I'm still setting things up and haven't gotten my hands on any style guides yet. I hope to start with the Chicago Manual soon and get a better grasp of what the differences between styles are.

Thanks again.
JTT
 
  2  
Reply Mon 3 Sep, 2012 09:53 am
@SarahG,
Quote:
I hope to start with the Chicago Manual soon and get a better grasp of what the differences between styles are.


The Chicago Manual is good except for the grammar section. They asked an incompetent on grammar, Bryan Garner, to rewrite that section.

Considering that grammar is relatively important to a proofreading business, you might want to do a bit of further research.

Quote:

February 02, 2005

THE CHICAGO MANUAL OF STYLE --- AND GRAMMAR

The Chicago Manual of Style (CMS) is an unparalleled resource for those engaged in publishing, particularly of academic material. But the Press decided to farm out the topic of grammar and usage, and the writer they selected was Bryan A. Garner, a former associate editor of the Texas Law Review who now teaches at Southern Methodist University School of Law and has written several popular books on usage and style. His chapter is unfortunately full of repetitions of stupidities of the past tradition in English grammar — more of them than you could shake a stick at.

http://itre.cis.upenn.edu/~myl/languagelog/archives/001869.html


Are you related to KennyG, SarahG? Smile
SarahG
 
  1  
Reply Tue 4 Sep, 2012 09:27 am
@JTT,
Thanks for the information! With the 16th edition released, I was hoping they had someone else do the new grammar section, but it looks like they didn't. I'll have to take that section with a grain of salt. (I think that, fortunately, I do have a decent grasp of basic grammar, which should help.)

Quote:
Are you related to KennyG, SarahG?


Nope, I'm a standalone "G." Smile
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Tue 4 Sep, 2012 07:18 pm
@SarahG,
There is an excellent, excellent real grammar book put out by Merriam-Webster - just a sec and I'll run to Amazon and get a description ...

Here ya be, Sarah the standalone G.



Merriam-Webster's Dictionary of English Usage by Merriam-Webster Inc. (Nov 1, 1994)

Hardcover
Order in the next 21 hours to get it by Thursday, Sep 6.
Only 9 left in stock - order soon.
Eligible for FREE Super Saver Shipping and 1 more promotion
$27.95 $18.45 $17.94 $1.00

http://www.amazon.com/Merriam-Websters-Dictionary-English-Usage-Merriam-Webster/dp/0877791325/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1346807671&sr=1-1&keywords=Merriam+webster+grammar

===============

Also,

Merriam-Webster's Guide to Punctuation and Style [Mass Market Paperback]

http://www.amazon.com/Merriam-Websters-Guide-Punctuation-Style-Merriam-Webster/dp/0877799210/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1346807671&sr=1-2&keywords=Merriam+webster+grammar
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