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present perfect with "today" and "now"

 
 
Reply Wed 22 Aug, 2012 04:24 pm
Hello. Again the present perfect. Is the following correct:
1)"I have been preparing food all day long and now I have prepared it",
"I had been preparing food for 6 hours yesterday (today), and now I have prepared it"? Does the meaning change in these two sentences if we say" ... I have prepared it by now" or "I have prepared it just now"? Can we use the pres. perf. with "now", "just now", "just", "by now" and how do these time words change the semantics of the whole sentence ?
2) Can we use the pres. perf. with "today"? If yes, does "today" necessarily mean an unspecified time ? and what about "now"?
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JTT
 
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Reply Wed 22 Aug, 2012 07:37 pm
mookbark
dalehileman
 
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Reply Sun 26 Aug, 2012 09:44 am
@Smarty11,
Quote:
1)"I have been preparing food all day long and now I have prepared it",
11, in colloquial everyday chat: “...but now I’m done” or “...and now it’s ready"


Quote:
"I had been preparing food for 6 hours yesterday (today), and now I have prepared it"?
Subtle difference: ”I had been preparing” suggests that your work had somehow been interrupted but maybe you resumed it today: “...when Mom insisted I quit, so this morning I finished up"

Quote:
Does the meaning change in these two sentences if we say" ... I have prepared it by now"
Also subtle diff: “by now” suggests you had plenty of time for the job and could even have even finished earlier. You might say, “....so by now it’s ready."

Quote:
or "I have prepared it just now”?
No. we’d say “I finished just now"


Quote:
Can we use the pres. perf. with "now", "just now", "just", "by now” ........?
//////the pres. perf. with "today”?.......
Sm, I’m no linguist but maybe this will help

http://onelook.com/?w=present+perfect&ls=a

11, slight differences in construction often indicate what I’ve called “subtle” differences in meaning. Hang in there, it takes years to catch on; though many of use never reach that pinnacle of achievement


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dalehileman
 
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Reply Sun 26 Aug, 2012 09:55 am
@JTT,
http://onelook.com/?w=mookbark&ls=a
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Sun 26 Aug, 2012 10:01 am
@dalehileman,
It's wordplay, Dale.

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