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Late 19th Century Austria Currency

 
 
Joe Nation
 
  1  
Reply Mon 23 Jul, 2012 12:03 pm
@Lustig Andrei,
Hell, I got paid for every farm job I ever had with a cash envelope. My first indoor job, now that I think of it, (1963 Bess Eaton Donuts) paid us in cash on Saturday nights and so did the GrandWay Supermarket.
Grandway showed that that had paid my union dues of .86 each week.

I think the first job I ever had that paid me with a check was the United States Air Force. (1967)
And I thought it was a big pain in the ass to have to go down to Credit Union to get some walking around money.

I worked for an oil field machinery manufacturer who gave everybody the option of getting a check or getting cash. Friday night at the Town Pump, there was a lot of take-home being turned into drank-away.

~~
Back to the subject of the thread. The writer would have been in cash at the newspaper office.

The question then is, did he have to sign anything to get it.?

Joe(we always did.)Nation



Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Mon 23 Jul, 2012 12:25 pm
@joefromchicago,
Those "pay envelopes" were called "Lohntüte" (literally: "salary bag").

http://i49.tinypic.com/4t6gzd.jpg

Common until the early 60's - afterwards, everyone got (and gets) the salary on the bank account.

0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Mon 23 Jul, 2012 12:26 pm
@Joe Nation,
Really? I left the Army in '67 and there was still a pay line leading to some officer at a folding table who counted out the cash. It was also the best place to converd USD to Deutche Marks.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Mon 23 Jul, 2012 12:28 pm
@Lustig Andrei,
Lustig Andrei wrote:

As you say, Joe, this is really fascinating stuff to me as well. However, I'd like to gently remind everyone that the OP's original question was not what this piece of paper might be called in German but,rsther, whether such a negotiable instrument was likely to be in use in Austria of the 1870s as payment to someone contributing to a newspaper. (Perhaps a free-lancer, not an employee?)

Well, as a free-lancer he would have got in 1870 cash, xxxGulden and xxKreuzer.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 23 Jul, 2012 12:35 pm
@roger,
Me too, and i was in the army from 70 to 73. (No Deutsche Marks, though, i wasn't in Dutchland.)
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Mon 23 Jul, 2012 01:14 pm
@Joe Nation,
Joe Nation wrote:

The question then is, did he have to sign anything to get it.?

Yes. A "Quittung" (receipt)

This actually is an Austrian, with 'Gulden' and 'Kreutzer' as it would have been in 1870 ...
http://i50.tinypic.com/15pojmv.jpg
Joe Nation
 
  1  
Reply Mon 23 Jul, 2012 01:36 pm
@roger,
That's the US Army for you.

We Zoomies liked that part because the Gyrines, the Swabbies and Groundpounders all got paid in cash. We would borrow some to get in the Friday night poker game and take home enough not to have to cash the USAF check until Monday or Tuesday. Smile
This was at Defense Language Institute - Monterey, CA. All the branches were there together and there was never a cross service fight. (Not with me anyhow, all those guys (especially The Marines) could have churned me like butter.... .)

Joe(My best hand ever was four eights...I cleaned up.)Nation
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Mon 23 Jul, 2012 02:08 pm
@Joe Nation,
In 69/70 (and a couple of years later) we conscripts got our "salary" in cash here, in a pay envelope. (I was, a suppose, a swappy, but from the 'head-steered' subdivison, not a "goat" Very Happy ).

Usally, we then (we got the money every fortnight) lent some to the regulars, since they got the salary on their accounts where the spouses had their hands on ...
I didn't take any interest. But somehow it made my life on board easier ... Wink
0 Replies
 
Lustig Andrei
 
  1  
Reply Mon 23 Jul, 2012 02:34 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Walter Hinteler wrote:

Joe Nation wrote:

The question then is, did he have to sign anything to get it.?

Yes. A "Quittung" (receipt)

This actually is an Austrian, with 'Gulden' and 'Kreutzer' as it would have been in 1870 ...
http://i50.tinypic.com/15pojmv.jpg


Is it likely, then, that what the OP is looking at is, in fact, a Quittung which he is mistaking for a negotiable check?
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Mon 23 Jul, 2012 02:50 pm
@Lustig Andrei,
I don't think so.
The writer gets paid by the newspaper, with banknotes and coins printed and minted by the Privilegierte Österreichische Nationalbank (the Austrian-Hungarian National Bank of that period). And he signs a sheet of paper, with which he certifies that he got his money.
0 Replies
 
joefromchicago
 
  1  
Reply Mon 23 Jul, 2012 02:57 pm
@Lustig Andrei,
As Walter explained, the Quittung is a receipt.
Lustig Andrei
 
  1  
Reply Mon 23 Jul, 2012 03:03 pm
@joefromchicago,
Oh, I understand what the Quittung is. I'm simply asking about the original question with which this thread started. There is no explanation given for why the OP is asking the question. I'm wondering if he has seen a Quittung and mistaken it for a check (there are certain cosmetic similarities in appearance) and is now asking whether this could be a genuine check, given the date on it, or whether it's something like a forgery. That's how I understand the motivation for the original question.
0 Replies
 
Joe Nation
 
  1  
Reply Mon 23 Jul, 2012 03:20 pm
jdickstein ,,,,remember her? him?...I'm guessing the OP is a writer trying to be accurate about a detail.
(good writer, good)
There's nothing worse than to rolling along in a good story when some little thing throws all the images out of whack.

There's a song on the radio that wasn't on the radio during the time in question.

In a movie about Civil War soldiers, two are in bathtubs with bars of Ivory Soap (not invented until 1879)

And, not really connected, but I always ask:

Joe(What happened to the dog in Rocky I?)Nation



Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Tue 24 Jul, 2012 03:53 am
@Joe Nation,
In the movie The Party, whcih was basically a Peter Sellers vehicle, he plays an Indian actor who is a walking disaster. He's playing Gunga Din, and the director starts screaming cut every time he appears on camera. In one scene, he comes up behind an enemy sentry, and, reaching around the sentry's head to muffle him while slitting his throat, he displays his lovely Rollex watch.

Cut ! ! !
0 Replies
 
 

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