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Bush Installs Judge, Bypassing Senate

 
 
au1929
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 Feb, 2004 10:36 am
I guess the Republicans are simon pure. They have or will never stoop to the use of the filibuster. Get real! Politicians will and always have used every mechanism available to them.
0 Replies
 
McGentrix
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 Feb, 2004 11:01 am
au1929 wrote:
I guess the Republicans are simon pure. They have or will never stoop to the use of the filibuster. Get real! Politicians will and always have used every mechanism available to them.


then you agree that Bush's placement of Judge Pryor is ok then, right?
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au1929
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 Feb, 2004 11:13 am
Right or wrong it is within the law. The same as the filibuster. Although, I believe the filibuster is necessary to avoid the tyranny of the majority.
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McGentrix
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 Feb, 2004 11:47 am
agreed.
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blatham
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 Feb, 2004 11:49 am
Fedral wrote:
The problem comes when one party decides to totally impede the 'will of the people' in allowing their elected officials to vote yes or no on a candidate by the process of filibustering.

In this case, the Democrats in their arrogant 'we know what is best for everyone' attitude, have decided that since they can't win the vote to block certain judicial candidates that they will just 'hold their breath until they turn blue'

In their petulance, they seem to have forgotten that their jobs are to represent their constituents and via the democratic process.


That is just too silly for words.

170 or so judicial nominees put forward by Bush have already been passed. Four or a half dozen have been held back.

During the previous administration, fully ONE THIRD of the judicial appointments forwarded by the Clinton adminstration were blocked by the conservatives.
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blueveinedthrobber
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 Feb, 2004 12:08 pm
Fedral wrote:

In their petulance, they seem to have forgotten that their jobs are to represent their constituents and via the democratic process.


I believe that you would find that everytime these petulant Democrats take whatever steps they can to stop the march towards monarchy that bush inc. is on, they ARE representing their constituency as they wish to be represented. Just my guess.
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au1929
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 Feb, 2004 12:21 pm
The republicans remind me of the three monkeys. Hear no evil, see no evil and speak no evil no matter the lies their great and benevolent leader says and what he does. It must be the missing gray matter. Embarrassed Embarrassed
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Fedral
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 Feb, 2004 01:02 pm
And the Democrats like to paint themselves with the color of purity.

They see themselves as faultless and Jesus Christ (Oh I'm sorry, religion isn't allowed in politics)

They like to see themselves as righteous as Saint George slaying all that is evil in this world (Like the evil Republican dragons)

They seem to see themselves as having such purity of purpose as to make Joan of Arc seem flighty.

And in all of this they seem to think that their vision of the future is the only one that matters and that those who disagree with them are evil and thoroughly uncaring.

In their minds, those who blindly follow Senator Kerry and ignore his faults are 'free thinkers' and the 'saviors of the nation'

Yet in their minds, those who support President Bush are somehow 'mindless drones'.


I love Liberals for their ability to stand, covered in muck, in a pig sty and disparage all the mud you have on your shoes.
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Fedral
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 Feb, 2004 01:22 pm
Oh, and just in case you Dems TRULY believe that your candidate is on the 'side of the angels' I give you this:

Kerry Lobbied for Contractor Who Made Illegal Contributions[/u]
From The Los Angeles Times
By Lisa Getter and Tony Perry, Times Staff Writers
February 19, 2004

WASHINGTON - Sen. John F. Kerry sent 28 letters in behalf of a San Diego defense contractor who pleaded guilty last week to illegally funneling campaign contributions to the Massachusetts senator and four other congressmen.

Members of Congress often write letters supporting constituent businesses and favored projects. But as the Democratic presidential front-runner, Kerry has promoted himself as a candidate who has never been beholden to campaign contributors and special interests.

Between 1996 and 1999, Kerry participated in a letter-writing campaign to free up federal funds for a guided missile system that defense contractor Parthasarathi "Bob" Majumder was trying to build for U.S. warplanes. …

Kerry's letters were sent to fellow members of Congress - and to the Pentagon - while Majumder and his employees were donating money to the senator, court records show. During the three-year period, Kerry received about $25,000 from Majumder and his employees, according to Dwight L. Morris & Associates, which tracks campaign donations.

Court documents say the contractor told his employees they needed to make political contributions in order for him to gain influence with members of Congress. He then reimbursed them with proceeds from government contracts.

Federal prosecutors initially determined that $13,000 of the donations were illegally reimbursed, but they now say that nearly all of the money was tainted. They said there was no evidence Kerry or other members of Congress would have known that.

Asked what he did to repay the money, Kerry's campaign said Wednesday he had donated $13,000 to charity on Feb. 9 - which was two days before Majumder's guilty plea. …

Campaign senior advisor Michael Meehan said Kerry was concerned that the military project was on hold and might jeopardize work for people in his home state. …

Kerry sent at least 21 letters to the secretary of the Navy, the secretary of Defense, the Defense Department comptroller and to members of the House and the Senate committees that control and finance military contracts. …

All include Kerry's appeal that the project be funded, and each year, the letters seemed to produce results. The federal money followed.

"It obviously raises questions about whether the campaign contributions bought action from Kerry," said Steven Weiss, communications director of the Center for Responsive Politics …

Last week Majumder, 52, pleaded guilty to two counts of illegal campaign contributions. He could be sentenced to six years in prison. The government dropped 38 other counts.

Majumder admitted giving illegal contributions to Kerry and Reps. Randy "Duke" Cunningham (R-San Diego), Duncan Hunter (R-El Cajon), John P. Murtha (D-Pa.) and former Rep. Joe Scarborough (R-Fla.), totaling more than $95,000. To settle a civil suit, Majumder has agreed to repay $3 million to the federal government. …

Majumder, a naturalized U.S. citizen born in India, began working on the missile program in 1989 - and established his company - with a $50,000 grant from the federal government. Federal funding increased over time. But in 1996, the Defense Department proposed rescinding $35 million for the project and not funding it in the future.

Kerry joined with other senators to protest. Congress reinserted the money into the budget, but the Navy held onto the funds. …

In 1997, funding for the program was put on hold again. Kerry joined Sens. Edward M. Kennedy of Massachusetts and Dianne Feinstein of California in writing to then-Undersecretary of Defense John Hamre on March 10, 1997. …

The letter from the three Democrats seemed to work. On March 27, Hamre wrote back to say he had released the money.

Kerry wrote other letters to Republican and Democratic senators on the appropriations committee, asking that they include $55 million in the 1998 spending bill for "an important military research and development program that will greatly improve the self-protection capability of our close air support aircraft."

He wrote again in 1998, urging that senators give the program an additional $15 million.

Meehan, his campaign advisor, said Wednesday that Kerry felt that, as a Massachusetts lawmaker, he should question why the money was being held up. …

John Valkus, a close friend of Majumder, said the contractor turned to making political contributions "so he could play in the same league as the big boys: Lockheed and Raytheon." …

Majumder told his employees, subcontractors and friends that he would pay them back for their contributions, which is illegal. …

The Majumder case isn't the first time that Kerry received tainted campaign money.

In September 1996, Taiwanese American entrepreneur Johnny Chung held a fundraiser for Kerry in Beverly Hills. He later pleaded guilty to making illegal campaign contributions, including $8,000 raised at the Beverly Hills event.

Kerry's Senate office arranged a high-level meeting for Chung at the Securities and Exchange Commission within a few days of the fundraiser.

The contract to Majumder's firm involved an effort to improve technology to allow missiles to destroy ground-based radar systems even after those systems have been switched off and are no longer emitting radiation. …
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au1929
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 Feb, 2004 05:14 pm
And who friend Federal Is the "EVIL" Bush beholden to. God,Jesus or the oil interests.
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BillW
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 Feb, 2004 05:16 pm
Satan
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OCCOM BILL
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 Feb, 2004 05:52 pm
Funny the guy making the most sense hear is from Germany (not the US). If you skip all of this partisan nonsense; you are left with Thomas's correct reasoning and statements of same. Very well done Thomas.
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IronLionZion
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Feb, 2004 03:14 am
I don't understand the signifigance of the judge's position. Maybe somebody can fill me in on what power he will wield as a federal appeals judge and why this is so profoundly disturbing.
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BillW
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Feb, 2004 08:53 am
He is there for life and his ideology becomes a fixture of the future. Appeals courts have been used to direct the course of change from human rights to government intent to total legal doctrine......
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McGentrix
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Feb, 2004 09:43 am
No, he is there for a year. Appointments like this are not permanent, just a temporary patch.
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roger
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Feb, 2004 01:27 pm
Appeals court benches are almost a prerequisite to the supremen court, ILZ.
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joefromchicago
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Feb, 2004 01:42 pm
IronLionZion wrote:
I don't understand the signifigance of the judge's position. Maybe somebody can fill me in on what power he will wield as a federal appeals judge and why this is so profoundly disturbing.

Federal appellate court judges hear appeals from federal trial courts. This involves reviewing the decisions of those courts and determining if they were correct. Federal appeals courts are intermediate courts of appeals: their decisions can be appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court. The Supreme Court, however, hears only a tiny fraction of the cases that the appeals courts hear, so, in the vast majority of cases, the appeals court is the last stop for litigants in the federal system.

And, as roger points out, presidents nowadays almost always choose supreme court justices from the ranks of federal appellate court judges (even if those judges have spent only a brief amount of time on the appellate court, such as Souter and Thomas).
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