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Question about food ingredients.

 
 
Reply Mon 4 Jun, 2012 04:21 am
Hey friends, I have some questions about ingredients and the way some of them are listed on the back of such foods like stir fry sauce's and soup flavouring.
has anyone noticed?;
Preservitives (220)
Maize thickener (1422)
Emulsifiers (471, 481)
Anti Caking Agent (551)
Flavour Enhancers (621, 635)
Colour (150 c)
Does anyone know what any of these are, or maby you know what the numbers mean? If you have any information about these ingredients I would love to hear what you have to say.

Thanks -Your mate, let's say uhhh Bob.
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 4 Jun, 2012 04:31 am
I can tell you that list did not originate in the United States, so you may not get much information in this forum.
contrex
 
  0  
Reply Mon 4 Jun, 2012 05:10 am
Setanta wrote:

I can tell you that list did not originate in the United States, so you may not get much information in this forum.


... because only Amerikkans live here? Or no Americans know about Google and Wikipedia? Non-Americans don't ever join Able2know, which is just as well, because -- of course -- they don't know anything, for example they don't know what "INS numbers" are...

Preservatives (220) [spelling fixed]
220 Sulphur dioxide

Maize thickener (1422)
1422 Acetylated Distarch Adipate (stabiliser)

Emulsifiers (471, 481)
471 Mono- and diglycerides of fatty acids (glyceryl monostearate, glyceryl distearate)
481 Sodium stearoyl-2-lactylate

Anti Caking Agent (551)
551 Silicon dioxide (Silica)

Flavour Enhancers (621, 635)
621 Monosodium glutamate (MSG)
635 Disodium 5'-ribonucleotides

Colour (150 c)
150c Ammonia caramel



Setanta
 
  -1  
Reply Mon 4 Jun, 2012 05:17 am
@contrex,
No, asshole, because the majority of participants here are Americans. Most of us are not obsessed with displaying our sophistication online by wasting our time doing searches that the OP can do him- or herself. Are you suggesting that the OP does not "know about Google and Wikipedia?" Dickhead.
contrex
 
  0  
Reply Mon 4 Jun, 2012 05:25 am
@Setanta,
Setanta wrote:
Are you suggesting that the OP does not "know about Google and Wikipedia?"


No, I'm suggesting that you are too much of an asshat to actually help the OP. I'll repeat that. YOU ARE AN ASSHAT. Too much wanking with the Stars And Stripes wrapped around your weiner has clearly leached most of your grey ("gray") matter away.

0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  0  
Reply Mon 4 Jun, 2012 05:29 am
Here is a sample of Mr. "Help the OP's" tags:

"Idiot, Troll, Do My Homework, Lazy Student, Do My Homework For Me, I Am Lazy . . .

Yeah, you're all about helping the folks who show up here . . .

Hypocrite.
contrex
 
  -1  
Reply Mon 4 Jun, 2012 05:36 am
@Setanta,
Setanta wrote:
Hypocrite.


A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 4 Jun, 2012 05:42 am
Mr. Emerson would ask, then, why you are so consistently a hypocrite.
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  2  
Reply Mon 4 Jun, 2012 10:48 am
@Setanta,
Once again I see that contrex misses the point. A term like "maize thickener" would merely be listed as "Cornstarch" had the list been made in the US. SOme F&F's are non translateable (like the 481 ). We use a different system than the UK's INS. We use a system called CAS registry . This is a worldwide system that is updated by the addition of about 12K substances DAILY
contrex
 
  3  
Reply Mon 4 Jun, 2012 11:40 am
@farmerman,
farmerman wrote:
We use a different system than the UK's INS. We use a system called CAS registry . This is a worldwide system that is updated by the addition of about 12K substances DAILY


It's not the "UK's" INS. You'd think the letter I (for International) would have told most people that. The Internation Numbering System is use by most countries around the world. The numbers are of products and addtives listed in the (United Nations) World Health Organisation's Codex Alimentarius. In European Union countries (including the UK) they use the same numbering system, but with an E in front. The INS numbering system is widely used in the USA in nutrition science publications and academic papers.



contrex
 
  2  
Reply Mon 4 Jun, 2012 11:42 am
@farmerman,
farmerman wrote:
SOme F&F's are non translateable (like the 481 ).


Sodium stearoyl-2-lactylate (sodium stearoyl lactylate or SSL) is an FDA approved food additive.
0 Replies
 
contrex
 
  2  
Reply Mon 4 Jun, 2012 11:44 am
@farmerman,
farmerman wrote:
We use a system called CAS registry . This is a worldwide system that is updated by the addition of about 12K substances DAILY


The CAS registry is a list of all chemicals, not just food additives.

Once again Farmerman misses the point. (Which is that the OP was asking about INS numbers)

0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 4 Jun, 2012 01:04 pm
@farmerman,
Exactly--that immediately told me that listing did not have a U.S. origin. Labelling requirements in the U.S. for ingredients only require that ingredients be listed from greatest to least, by weight. The precentages, the weight--none of that is required, just the order. Which is why i told the OP that he might not get much information in this forum, where the overwhelming majority of members are Americans.

Regardless of what classification system is in use, none of that is required on U.S. food labels.
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  2  
Reply Mon 4 Jun, 2012 01:20 pm
@contrex,
no YOu missed the point which was that it was not a US label. WE dont use INS in our labels (which is why the letter choices were English not US). As Set stated and which you conveniently ignored. OUR labels dont require anything other than order of percent weight of each ingredient.Also, our component lists are presented in the CAS registry terminology.

You got yourself all excited about a perfectly reasonable and accurate statement that set made. Why all the drama?
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 4 Jun, 2012 01:23 pm
@contrex,
In the case of labels , it IS the UK's INS. You spell and phrase things differently.

Sorry dude but that is a fact that separates our two cultures.
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 4 Jun, 2012 01:24 pm
My first clue was maize--i knew immediately it was not from the U.S.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 4 Jun, 2012 01:37 pm
@Setanta,
Quote:
because only Amerikkans live here? Or no Americans know about Google and Wikipedia? Non-Americans don't ever join Able2know, which is just as well, because -- of course -- they don't know anything, for example they don't know what "INS numbers" are...

Preservatives (220) [spelling fixed]
220 Sulphur dioxide

Maize thickener (1422)
1422 Acetylated Distarch Adipate (stabiliser)

Emulsifiers (471, 481)
471 Mono- and diglycerides of fatty acids (glyceryl monostearate, glyceryl distearate)
481 Sodium stearoyl-2-lactylate

Anti Caking Agent (551)
551 Silicon dioxide (Silica)

Flavour Enhancers (621, 635)
621 Monosodium glutamate (MSG)
635 Disodium 5'-ribonucleotides

Colour (150 c)
150c Ammonia caramel





I was a little peeved at his shot that was accusatory all the while contrex was the one who is being a jerk. Then he included the list which was clearly derived from a UK spelling book..
Well, I hope the guy who initiated the thread doesnt get annoyed at how this playground monitors itself

Setanta
 
  -1  
Reply Mon 4 Jun, 2012 01:44 pm
Cuntrex has been obsessively hateful to me for quite a while, but especially since i wrote a post suggesting the English are cowards. It was aimed at IzzythePutz, who was being a dick, as he so often does--but Cuntrex rose to the bait faster than a trout in mayfly season.
0 Replies
 
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Mon 4 Jun, 2012 02:16 pm
@farmerman,
farmerman wrote:

In the case of labels , it IS the UK's INS. You spell and phrase things differently.


The International Numbering System for food additives is run and maintained by the World Health Organisation. This is an agency of the United Nations. Not the UK government or state. The European Union issues "E numbers" for approved food additives for sale within the EU. For each product approved, the EU number consists of the INS number for that product, prefixed with an E. Nothing to do with the UK, so how can you call it the UK's INS? It's not our organisation.

0 Replies
 
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Mon 4 Jun, 2012 02:17 pm
@farmerman,
farmerman wrote:
he included the list which was clearly derived from a UK spelling book..


Wikipedia.
0 Replies
 
 

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