19
   

Share your favourite internet food & recipe sites.

 
 
msolga
 
Reply Sun 1 Nov, 2009 06:30 pm
OK, I've reluctantly had to put an end to my cookbook buying compulsion. Enough is enough. Way too expensive, plus how many cookbooks is it reasonable for one person to own before the person's house becomes too small to hold them all? Neutral

However, there is always room to investigate new recipes, fresh ingredients & new approaches to cooking, I say! I've been doing quite a bit of this on the internet lately, though my Google searches tend to often lead to the same sites. Now I'm looking for new, uncharted territory!

So, fellow A2K cooks & aspiring cooks, would you like to share your very favourite cooking sites here? Supply a link & perhaps tell us a little about why this site has been particularly useful to you.

I don't mind what type of food sites you choose to recommend: anything from ethnic foods, vegetarian foods, sites about specific ingredients, basic beginner sites, "celebrity chefs" ..... just what ever you've found really useful. And, of course, you don't have to restrict your contribution to just one site if there are a number you regularly use. The more the merrier!





 
tsarstepan
 
  2  
Reply Sun 1 Nov, 2009 06:37 pm
@msolga,
http://www.cooksillustrated.com/
I subscribe to the magazine.

And I occasionally stop by the Food Network site... http://www.foodnetwork.com/.
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sun 1 Nov, 2009 06:41 pm
@msolga,
OK, I'll go first. Here's a recipe from an Australian (newspaper) site I found yesterday. I noticed the site had some good, do-able recipes, provided by some known, reliable Oz "media cooks". I'm going to try this particular recipe soon. It looks very simple & easy to make. (& I love beetroot!):

Cumin-roasted beetroot and yoghurt

Author: Master Chef George Calombaris Source: The Sydney Morning Herald Monday October 26, 2009 Greek, Quick, Contemporary, Healthy, Vegetarian, Wheat free, Egg free, Side dish
Master Chef George Calombaris learnt to appreciate food from his Greek mother and grandmother.

http://www.cuisine.com.au/thumbnail?inode=605600041&w=350&h=350&r=255&g=255&b=255

Ingredients

* 600g beetroot
* 1 tbsp chopped thyme
* ½ head garlic, skin on, roughly chopped
* 40ml vegetable oil
* 2 tsp cumin seeds, toasted and crushed
* 40ml extra virgin olive oil
* 20ml sherry vinegar
* 1 tbsp yoghurt
* 1 tbsp coriander, shredded
* Salt, to taste

Method

Preheat oven. Place whole beetroots in a roasting tray and scatter with thyme and garlic.

Drizzle with oil, cover with foil and bake at 180C for one hour or until a skewer passes though easily.

Once cool, using gloves, peel beetroots and cut into rough cubes.

Combine cumin seeds, olive oil and sherry vinegar and pour over cut beetroots.

Mix yoghurt and coriander through beetroot, season with salt and serve.

Serves 4

http://www.cuisine.com.au/recipe/cumin-roasted_beetroot_and_yoghurt
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sun 1 Nov, 2009 06:43 pm
@tsarstepan,
You beat me to the punch, tsarstepan! Very Happy

(Checking out those sites right now!)

Thanks!
0 Replies
 
dyslexia
 
  2  
Reply Sun 1 Nov, 2009 06:48 pm
I don't actually do recipes, I think Lady Diane has a cookbook somewhere. i tend to stick with foods I grew up with but I do look on the net for cooking specifics that I am unsure of. Most everything I know is based on foods that I grew when I was still farming (fresh veggies/fruits etc as well as meat that I raised (pork/beef).
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sun 1 Nov, 2009 06:54 pm
@tsarstepan,
This one's terrific, tsarstepan! Videos & lots of "how to" information! I've bookmarked it.

http://www.cooksillustrated.com/

(Incidentally, I don't know quite what to call you. tsarstepan, tsar or stepan? Do you have a preference? Smile )
0 Replies
 
dyslexia
 
  2  
Reply Sun 1 Nov, 2009 06:57 pm
@dyslexia,
my favorite common breakfast when farming was to cut very fresh spinach washed and steamed and spritised with vinigar/pepper sauce; 2 medium boiled eggs, 2 slices of apple smoked bacon, an english muffin with spanish marmalade (orange) and a pot of assam tea.
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sun 1 Nov, 2009 06:59 pm
@dyslexia,
Fair enough. You're probably a bit of a living resource on those foods you grew up with, dys! If you were pushed to name one or two that you really favour, what might they be?

Quote:
i tend to stick with foods I grew up with but I do look on the net for cooking specifics that I am unsure of


Any particular site/s that you've found particularly helpful for this purpose?
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sun 1 Nov, 2009 07:03 pm
@dyslexia,
That sounds really good. Extra good if most of the ingredients (eggs, spinach, etc.) are fresh "home grown" ones!
You've made me hungry now.
dyslexia
 
  2  
Reply Sun 1 Nov, 2009 07:03 pm
@msolga,
yeah http://www.foodnetwork.com/good-eats/index.html
dyslexia
 
  2  
Reply Sun 1 Nov, 2009 07:11 pm
@msolga,
my favorite lunch was a pot of green beans (I always planted a 100 ft row of Blue Lake green beans) cooked with a ham hock and a cup of bunching onions (pearl onions) again witb vinigar/pepper sauce and a Jiffy mix cornbread on the side. Pretty much everything I ate was homegrown, ain't that way anymore as we now live in the city.
tsarstepan
 
  2  
Reply Sun 1 Nov, 2009 07:12 pm
@dyslexia,
Alton Brown is my favorite food scientist/Food Network celebrity
0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sun 1 Nov, 2009 07:19 pm
@dyslexia,
Hey that's a good site, too! I just checked out the "cooking from the pantry" section & found this recipe. I'm going to give it a go. Just a slight adjustment (replace the cheese, because I don't know of it) & the rest looks dead easy. Yum. Thanks!:

Smoked Paprika Open Face Lasagna
Recipe courtesy Jeffrey Saad
Rated: 5 stars out of 5 (24)


http://img.foodnetwork.com/FOOD/2009/08/27/0131947_Smoked-Paprika-Lasagna_s4x3_med.jpg

Cook Time: 30 min
Level: Easy
Yield: 4 servings


Prep:15 min
Inactive Prep
--
Cook: 30 min
Total:45 min

Ingredients

* 2 tablespoons olive oil, plus 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
* 1/4 pound Mexican chorizo sausage, removed from casing
* 1 pound ground beef
* 1 onion, diced
* 2 cloves garlic, chopped
* 1 cup red wine
* 1 (28-ounce) can crushed Italian tomatoes
* 3 tablespoons smoked paprika, divided
* 1/2 cup panko bread crumbs
* 2 tablespoons heavy cream
* 1 tablespoon salt
* 8 lasagna noodles
* 1 cup chopped flat-leaf parsley
* 1 cup grated manchego cheese

Directions

Heat the 2 tablespoons of oil in a wide pot over medium-high heat. Once hot add the chorizo, ground beef onion, and garlic. Using a spatula, break up the meat as small as you can as it browns. Saute until dark brown, about 10 minutes.

Add the red wine and simmer until the wine is reduced by half, about 1 minute.

Stir in the tomatoes, 2 tablespoons smoked paprika, panko, heavy cream, and salt. Cover the pot, reduce the heat to very low, and cook for 15 minutes.

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil over medium-high heat. Add the lasagna noodles and cook according to the package instructions. Drain and set aside.

Put 1 lasagna noodle on each of 4 plates. Spoon the meat mixture over the pasta and spread it out evenly. Sprinkle on about 1/8 of the parsley and grated manchego. Lay another lasagna noodle on top. Sprinkle with more parsley and manchego over the second noodle and dust with remaining 1 tablespoon smoked paprika. Drizzle with extra-virgin olive oil and serve.

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/jeffrey-saad/smoked-paprika-open-face-lasagna-recipe/index.html
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sun 1 Nov, 2009 07:27 pm
@dyslexia,
Quote:
Pretty much everything I ate was homegrown, ain't that way anymore as we now live in the city.


Yeah, I know. I grew up on a farm, too. Just about everything we ate (bar meat) was homegrown. Store bought fruit & vegetables just don't compare with fresh from the garden. As for store bought eggs (even "free range")! Well ... nothing like the taste of freshly laid eggs from your own chickens, which have been running around in sunshine, eating good food ....<sigh>
0 Replies
 
CalamityJane
 
  2  
Reply Sun 1 Nov, 2009 09:05 pm
Here is a place where I look often http://www.101cookbooks.com/
and this is a blog of a French gal living in the U.S. she has great recipes
(and a lovely baby) http://www.latartinegourmande.com/

I also follow a German cooking blog that has great Italian recipes,
but it's in German (the pictures are always mouth watering)
http://cucina-casalinga.blogspot.com/
jespah
 
  2  
Reply Mon 2 Nov, 2009 04:44 am
You're gonna hate me because these have calorie counts: http://recipes.sparkpeople.com/
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Mon 2 Nov, 2009 04:50 am
@jespah,
Not at all, jespah!
Calorie counts can be jolly useful! Smile

I've taken a quick look at the site, but as I'm in the middle of cooking (a very late) dinner, will spend more time poking about in there later!

I'm hoping others here might find this site sharing exercise as useful as I'm finding it.
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  2  
Reply Mon 2 Nov, 2009 05:10 am
@dyslexia,
Quote:
Re: msolga (Post 3800741)
my favorite lunch was a pot of green beans (I always planted a 100 ft row of Blue Lake green beans) cooked with a ham hock and a cup of bunching onions (pearl onions) again witb vinigar/pepper sauce and a Jiffy mix cornbread on the side.


YASSAH DAT WHAT IM TALKIN BOUT!!! Hamhocks and bean with some teeny oniawn. Thass a NAWLINS special dat I fondly recall. The cawnbread on the side is of special interest cause weve been arguin about cornbread lately. SOme like it sweet, some like it not sweet, some like it "cakey" and me , I like a sweet gritty cawnbread.

The cooks illustrated site is great because they go into the chemistry of the cooking and you learn WHY something tastes or cooks up like it does. They also test kitchen stuff so you can compare features and prices.
0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Mon 2 Nov, 2009 10:00 pm
@CalamityJane,
Catching up from some of yesterday's posts. You're right about this thread, Jane. The photographs are quite mouth watering. I can even understand a wee bit of the text (I think!), by creatively applying my "pigeon German"! Smile :

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_NntRCdQx5bw/SuyYp1rdrYI/AAAAAAAADOI/e5hseoHDv2Q/s400/Pizza+Capriccio+klein+copyr.jpg
'Pizza Capriccio' - Gemüse mit Parmesan

http://cucina-casalinga.blogspot.com/
0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Mon 2 Nov, 2009 10:18 pm
@CalamityJane,
Hey, I found an Anna Thomas recipe in your 101 Cookbooks, link, Jane! She was one of my major inspirations & a constantly used resource, years ago when I decided to "go vegetarian" . Just fished out my very worn & yellowing 1996 copy of From Anna's Kitchen. She's terrific. And I love soups like this one! Yum!:

Quote:
Green Soup with Ginger Recipe

http://www.101cookbooks.com/mt-static/images/food/green_ginger_soup_recipe.jpg

I made my own tweaks to Anna's soup, and my version is as follows. The main difference was that the soup was so pretty after cooking (see photos), that I decided not to puree mine at the last minute. But I did puree the leftovers (also delicious!), just a different soup altogether. It's up to you really. Anna also mentions that she sometimes adds a bit of miso or tamari at the very end to deepen the flavor, but you should add it sparingly, and taste as you go.

1 large yellow onion (250g)
2 tablespoons (30 ml.) olive oil
1 1/2 teaspoons sea salt, plus more to taste
1 large sweet potato (12 ounces; 350 g)
1 large leek, white and light green parts (5 ounces; 140 g)
1 bunch spinach (8 ounces; 225 g)
1 large bunch green chard (12 ounces; 350 g)
3 tablespoons (30 g) chopped fresh ginger, plus more to taste
2 cups (500 ml) good-tasting vegetable broth
2-4 teaspoons fresh lemon juice
freshly ground black pepper

Chop the onion and cook it slowly in the olive oil with a sprinkle of salt, stirring now and then, over low heat until it is soft and golden, about half an hour.

Meanwhile, peel and dice the sweet potato and put it in a large soup pot with 4 cups (1 liter) water and a teaspoon of sea salt. Thoroughly wash the leek, spinach, and chard, chop them coarsely, and add them to the pot, along with the chopped ginger.

Bring the water to a boil, then lower the heat and simmer the soup, covered, for 30 minutes, or until the vegetables are completely tender. Add the caramelized onions when they are ready. When the vegetables are soft, add the vegetable broth (you can add less if you like a thicker soup) and decide whether you want your soup chunky, like this, or smooth. If the latter, puree the soup in a blender, in batches, or with an immersion blender until it is smooth.

Stir in 2 teaspoons of the lemon juice and a few grinds of black pepper. Taste, and correct the seasoning with additional salt or lemon juice.

Serves 5-6.

This recipe was adapted from Love Soup by Anna Thomas. Published by W. W. Norton & Company; September 2009.



http://www.101cookbooks.com/archives/green-soup-with-ginger-recipe.html
0 Replies
 
 

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