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A Shoe-in??!!

 
 
cockney sparrer
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Feb, 2004 10:43 am
Bobbie ----------- It's door jamb as far as I know.

using door jam is meaningless I think.
A door is known as a "rory" in parts of London.
Rory O'Moore.
So if asked to - "shut that rory, it's lettin' the cold in" ------ it means shut that door.
0 Replies
 
Letty
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Feb, 2004 01:20 pm
Roberta, I thought toe head was a white blond. Is it tow head? And here's a word that is NOT in the dictionary, but appeared in the NYT's crossword puzzle:
meting

and when one refers to "turning on a dime" in reference to a car, I have heard some folks say, "turning on a die". also another misnomer:

A sweet tooth has nothing to do with a desire for something sweet, it means a tooth that is sensitive to sweet stuff.

Well, I guess we could also say toe jamb. YUK!
0 Replies
 
Individual
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Feb, 2004 02:08 pm
Actually, meting means to give out by measure. From mete.
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Letty
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Feb, 2004 02:19 pm
Well, upon my word, individual. The clue was meting and the answer was doling. Thankee, thankee. I had forgotten the rule for adding suffixes when the word ends in a vowel, preceded by a consonant.
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dyslexia
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Feb, 2004 02:28 pm
"everybody pulled their socks up
everybody kicked their shoes off
everybody had a good year
everbody had a wet dream"
0 Replies
 
cockney sparrer
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Feb, 2004 04:01 pm
john lennon gets everywhere. they even called liverpool airport ------- john lennon airport
0 Replies
 
Equus
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Feb, 2004 05:13 pm
For several years, my magazine had a note in the masthead that persons or companies that reprinted without permission would be held liable "jointly and severely". I pointed this out repeatedly to my Editor, who insisted it was correct and refused to change it. (it should be jointly and severally)
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Feb, 2004 05:17 pm
Jointly and severally: sounds like fried chicken..
(but right).
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Roberta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Feb, 2004 10:11 pm
A friend of mine (another editor) had an argument with a writer over the writer's insistence that something can reek havoc. My friend, fuddy-duddy that she is, said she thought it was more likely the someone wreaks havoc.

I was hired to proofread a book after is was published. Part One, page 1. Full-color photo of Jackie Joyner Kersee leaping over a hurdle. And the caption said something about her participating in the 1980 Olympics. The ones held in Moscow. The ones the US boycotted. Published book.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Feb, 2004 10:13 pm
Havoc, the new cologne....
0 Replies
 
fiasco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 29 Feb, 2004 07:10 pm
Letty wrote:
Roberta, I thought toe head was a white blond. Is it tow head?
It's tow blonde, after the coarse broken flax prepared for spinning. Apparently it describes the colour and sometimes the texture of the hair.
0 Replies
 
 

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