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Past leaders of the UK

 
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Feb, 2004 12:37 pm
cockney sparrer wrote:
Then we learnt to speak French, which trickled down from roals via the courtiers to the peasants.
Another stepping stone towards modern English

Mmmh: "cow", "ox", "calf", "swine", "sheep" got company from "beef", "veal", "pork", "mutton".

However, the Norman French (which wasn't "Paris French" at all) became Anglo-Norman, being ever more mixed with Anglo-Saxon and more distant from French.

And three centuries later, Henry Bolingbroke (Henry IV), who reigned from 1399 till 1413, became the first truly anglophone king after the Battle of Hastings again.
0 Replies
 
Equus
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Feb, 2004 07:02 pm
And George I (and II, I believe) couldn't speak English, being German.

By the way, how exactly did Henry IV break his Boling?
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joefromchicago
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Feb, 2004 07:14 pm
George I spoke English, but he did not speak it very well and preferred to use French when conversing with cabinet ministers and diplomats.

George II spoke English quite well.
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Tue 17 Feb, 2004 12:46 am
Equus wrote:
By the way, how exactly did Henry IV break his Boling?

Bolingbroke Castel was built by Randulph de Blundeville, the Earl of Lincoln, became the home of the powerful John of Gaunt in the 14th century and was the birthplace of his son, Henry Bolingbroke, who took the name of his birthplace.

I could imagine that 'Blundeville' somehow became 'Bolingbroke', but couldn't find anything confirming that.
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Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Tue 17 Feb, 2004 05:50 am
Speaking the local language doesn't seem to have mattered any more than who was actually the monarch. After the Napoleonic wars and the resurgence (with a vengeance) of reactionary monarchical politics in Europe, it was not at all uncommon for the "great powers" to get together to decide who should be the monarch of a country which they felt should have one, and without consultation with the locals. Sometimes that worked, more or less (Greece) and sometimes was a disaster (Mexico). George II did speak English, and had campaigned with Marlborough in the War of the Spanish Succession. Nevertheless, he remained very "German-oriented," spoke German with his intimates, and tried (often unsuccessfully) to steer British policy in a direction to favor the Electorate of Hanover. His nephew (or perhaps cousin?) Friedrich II of Prussia spoke French in preference to German, and wrote--wrote a great deal of poetry, philosophy, political theory, diplomatic assessment, military doctrine--in French. His german was very bad, and he preferred French anyway. Monarchy is a goofy system, and the results thereof are often goofy as well.
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Steve 41oo
 
  1  
Reply Sun 22 Feb, 2004 11:40 am
Monarchy is a goofy system

Well you should know Set, living under a succession of George Bushes.
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kev
 
  1  
Reply Tue 24 Feb, 2004 12:02 am
Steve (as 41oo) wrote:
Quote:
It really is an interesting subject even if you aren't British.


And if one happens to be British, one finds it all a terrible bore, only lightened by the prospect of the end of all of them.


I'll second that steve.
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Steve 41oo
 
  1  
Reply Tue 24 Feb, 2004 03:44 am
Cheers Kev

I should make it clear for any of our MI5/Special Branch readers, that I am a loyal citizen of this country and think our present Head of State has done a great job for Britain over the last 50 years.

All I ask is to be treated like a loyal citizen, and as such be awarded some say, however minimal, in the choice of my Head of State. Cool
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Owain Glynd-373-r
 
  1  
Reply Wed 19 May, 2004 08:45 am
Let's also not forget that the English themselves were a conquering userpist force and it could be argued that there is no legitimate English sovereign. The Britons who gave Britain it's name are still here and still speaking our ancient language (although the name the Saxon barbarians called us has unfortunately stuck in some quarters). At least the Tudor dynasty had a more credible claim as their bloodline went back to the great noble Sir Fôn Tewdwr family.

Cymru am Byth!
0 Replies
 
Steve 41oo
 
  1  
Reply Sat 22 May, 2004 04:49 pm
Welcome to a2k Owen Glendower

Were you at the Millenium Stadium for the Great Event today?
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raptor2479
 
  1  
Reply Wed 23 Feb, 2011 07:24 am
@roverroad,
There is a list. The website is www.shakespeare-online.com/keydates/
0 Replies
 
 

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