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Lupini beans? Any terrific suggestions?

 
 
msolga
 
Reply Tue 10 Feb, 2004 05:30 pm
I bought a packet of beans with nothing but "Lupini" on the label, because I liked the look of them. (Something like lima or butter beans, with skins on).
So .... now what do I do with them? Confused
What exactly are they meant for? Confused

I'm boiling them up right now, after a long soak. (they look tough!)
And was considering something like a "peasant -ish stew" tonight .... combining the cooked beens with something like onions, some garlic & chili, lightly fried in olive oil, & maybe some greens & chopped tomatoes thrown in ....

Any better suggestions?
If so, much appreciated! Very Happy
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Feb, 2004 05:43 pm
Oh ughhh! Shocked
I just tasted them after over a hour's boiling, to see of they were softening up ... Very bitter! & the skin's still quite tough.
If they don't improve drastically I may just have to throw them out! Shocked
Phoenix32890
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Feb, 2004 05:50 pm
http://users.rcn.com/sue.interport/food/lupini.html

Quote:
She said to soak them overnight. The skins will get wrinkled. The next day simmer them for several hours. They are done when the skins are smooth and when you taste one, it seems done (they will be quite firm, not soft like lima beans).

The beans will be bitter at this point. She then changes the water and leaves them for a couple of days under running water. Yes! She said she puts the pan in the sink or bathtub with the water running very slowly.


Looks like you left out the most important part! Very Happy
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Feb, 2004 05:54 pm
LUPINI BEANS CAN BE POISONOIUS just like Fava beans. They have alkaloids, dont eat this stuff.
0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Feb, 2004 05:57 pm
Thanks for that, Phoenix.
I did soak them though, for longer than she suggested. And I'm well into my second hour of cooking. These are tough little devils!!! Evil or Very Mad
And, hey, they certainly ARE bitter!! My lips are still puckered as I type this! Shocked
I don't know about leaving them under RUNNING WATER for ages .... We're in the middle of a drought here!

Looks like my mistake was not knowing what I was buying. Laughing
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Feb, 2004 06:06 pm
farmerman wrote:
LUPINI BEANS CAN BE POISONOIUS just like Fava beans. They have alkaloids, dont eat this stuff.


OMG, should I also throw out the saucepan I cooked them in????? Shocked
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Feb, 2004 06:08 pm
Have you just saved my life, farmerman? That's the last time I adventurously buy some mystery product because it looks *interesting*! Shocked
0 Replies
 
Phoenix32890
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Feb, 2004 06:16 pm
Quote:
Lupini beans, lupins
(Lupini albus -- Family Leguminosae)

Lupini beans are actually members of the pea family and are grown for their seeds and their flowers. They are flat, coin-shaped, yellow-brown seeds that have a small, round hole at one end. They are commonly purchased cooked or pickled in jars. They are enjoyed as a snack in Lebanon, Italy, Spain, and Portugal, where they are called tremocos. To serve the lupini, drain the liquid from the jar and place them in a bowl. As they are eaten, the inner bean is sucked from the skins and the skins discarded. The seeds of certain species are toxic and bitter when fresh. These are treated by first parboiling, then boiling or roasting. In spite of the lengthy time required to make them edible, they have been part of the Old World diet for more than 2,000 years. Some varieties are now grown to be used without preliminary preparation. The variety called tarwi has a high protein content.


http://www.innvista.com/health/foods/vegetables/lupini.htm

Chill out- They won't kill you, if you cook them first
!
0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Feb, 2004 06:21 pm
Very Happy

Oh, that's good to know, Phoenix! Thank you.
But I'm still going to throw them out .... The taste is had to describe ... Not nice at all!
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Feb, 2004 06:23 pm
I used to go to an Italian club in Pa where the old men would eat lupinis and fava beans. I was told that these two, if made improperly could make you very sick or , ulp, worse. I never eat stuff that has a "mas macho" catch to it. I learned my lesson from chewing tobacco with my friends in the 5th grade. we were chewing this Mail Pouch **** during recess and when we went back into school, all of us were blowing lunch and breakfast all over the place. Most of us didnt even make it to the batroom.
0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Feb, 2004 06:27 pm
Very wise, farmerman. Guess you'll never forget grade 5, yes? Very Happy
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Feb, 2004 06:09 pm
Gee, fresh favas are a seasonal delicacy... I think you have to eat lots to do yourself harm. Very good raw with some fresh pecorino.. or some parmigiano. I've put a few peeled ones in my soup pot too.

Lupini, I bought a jar in an italian deli, tried one or two and threw them out. Kept the jar for my stack of painting solvent containers...
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Feb, 2004 06:48 pm
ossobuco wrote:
Lupini, I bought a jar in an italian deli, tried one or two and threw them out. Kept the jar for my stack of painting solvent containers...


I can relate, osso! UGHhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh. Shocked I still shudder even thinking about them.
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 27 Feb, 2004 04:03 pm
apparently the lupin alkaloids are similar from lupini beans and lupine flowers.




The Australians have done a study , Sept 2001.
"LUPIN ALKALOIDS IN FOOD" i downloaded it freom a google search but cannot forward an adobe file. Try just typing in the report name into google

basically I can summarize the study

1 we fed some of this stuff to mice

2 a bunch died

3 we dont know what that means wrt humans

4ets about it mate
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Fri 27 Feb, 2004 11:40 pm
farmerman wrote:
.... a bunch died



Shocked I'm nor surprised!


Well somebody, somewhere must like them! Otherwise they wouldn't be available in shops. Beats me .....
0 Replies
 
alexiskb
 
  1  
Reply Wed 31 Aug, 2005 05:53 am
OMG!

I AM EATING LUPINI BEANS RIGHT NOW!
they are a portuguese thing as well.

totally delicious! second only to SOY for nutrition ( hence them being used as organic cattle feed!)

i am eating pre "made" beans, but will be contacting my portuguese friends for info on soaking. I think its as easy as soaking and replacing with more salty water every day for about 3 or 4 days - or until bitterness gone.

SO LOVELY!!! I AM MUNCHING NON STOP!!!
if you ever see a portuguese shop look for some pre soaked...

healthy and great. you dont know what you are missing

A (uk)
0 Replies
 
alexiskb
 
  1  
Reply Wed 31 Aug, 2005 06:20 am
ok - got method from portuguese relatives:

"soak them first overnight or all day, they will swell up
then drain and boil them for about an hour, no more (no salt...otherwise they will go tough)
drain and soak for +/- 4 days, changing water daily (if you taste them they are ready when they are no longer bitter) - i think best kept in fridge...
you can add salt to the water once they are ready to be eaten"

so there you have it...

p.s: there are many many varieties of lupin. THE SWEET LUPIN is what we (and pigs/cattle!) eat..
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Wed 31 Aug, 2005 06:44 am
alexiskb wrote:
OMG!

I AM EATING LUPINI BEANS RIGHT NOW!


Shocked
alexiskb
 
  1  
Reply Wed 31 Aug, 2005 06:54 am
http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/common/story_page/0,5744,15857410%255E23289,00.html


Low-fat lupin full of beans
Jane Lyons
July 09, 2005
LUPINS have been grown and the seed used as food since ancient times. The Roman writer Pliny said of the white lupin that "if taken commonly at meals, it will contribute a fresh colour and a cheerful countenance".

Two thousand years later, lupins are once again a source of good cheer: food scientists at Deakin University have revealed that the Australian sweet lupin can replace fat in meat, lower cholesterol, decrease blood glucose levels, improve bowel health, lower the risk of bowel cancer and taste good too.

Lupin research is fast replicating much of the work that has been done on the health benefits of soy.

And with George Weston Foods planning to build the world's largest lupin de-hulling plant in Western Australia, Schutz says it won't be long before the benefits of lupins will be appearing in a cake near you.

"Over the next two to three years you will see lupins appearing as an ingredient," he says.

contd...


YUM!!!!!!
over and out... from a UK lupini convert!
0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Wed 31 Aug, 2005 07:00 am
Welcome to A2K, alexiskb of the UK, rampant lupini been eater! Very Happy
I would have welcomed you in my earlier post, but the memory of those beans .... well, it sort of blotted everything else out! I'm not kidding in my earlier posts, you know. The ones I had we truly dreadful! I think, maybe, you've eaten some other variety. Mine we SO bitter! <shudder>
0 Replies
 
 

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