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Heads should roll = ?

 
 
Reply Thu 15 Dec, 2011 02:45 am

Context:

“We don’t put official paperwork in the trash,” said the commander, Maj. Gen. Thomas Richardson, at the meeting at the American Embassy in Baghdad.

Well, maybe a few careers should be put in the trash instead. Like those of the people in charge of this entire war. Those that STARTED this stupid war under false pretenses. Those that silenced the critics. Those that hid the ugly truths.

We no longer live in a democracy.
We are not a peace loving country.
We are not the 'good guys'.

And all of this for 2 - 3 TRILLION dollars?

Heads should roll. Someone must be held accountable.

More:

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/15/world/middleeast/united-states-marines-haditha-interviews-found-in-iraq-junkyard.html?pagewanted=3&_r=2&hp

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Type: Question • Score: 1 • Views: 694 • Replies: 6
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Old Goat
 
  1  
Reply Thu 15 Dec, 2011 02:48 am
It's basically alluding to the favoured method of execution in days gone by - beheading (chopping one's head off).

The author is being metaphorical, of course.
oristarA
 
  1  
Reply Thu 15 Dec, 2011 04:18 am
@Old Goat,
Old Goat wrote:

It's basically alluding to the favoured method of execution in days gone by - beheading (chopping one's head off).

The author is being metaphorical, of course.


Thank you.

But who "favoured" the method?
0 Replies
 
Old Goat
 
  1  
Reply Thu 15 Dec, 2011 04:27 am
Henry VIII for a start! ....

Here's more....

" Decapitation has been used as a form of capital punishment for millennia. The terms "capital offence", "capital crime", "capital punishment," derive from the Latin caput, "head", referring to the punishment for serious offenses involving the forfeiture of the head; i.e., death by beheading.[5] Decapitation by sword (or axe, a military weapon as well) was sometimes considered the "honorable" way to die for an aristocrat, who, presumably being a warrior, could often expect to die by the sword in any event; in England it was considered a privilege of noblemen to be beheaded. This would be distinguished from a "dishonorable" death on the gallows or through burning at the stake. In medieval England, high treason by nobles was punished by beheading; male commoner traitors, including knights, were hanged, drawn and quartered; female commoner traitors were burned at the stake."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beheading
oristarA
 
  1  
Reply Thu 15 Dec, 2011 08:55 am
@Old Goat,
Old Goat wrote:

Henry VIII for a start! ....

Here's more....

" Decapitation has been used as a form of capital punishment for millennia. The terms "capital offence", "capital crime", "capital punishment," derive from the Latin caput, "head", referring to the punishment for serious offenses involving the forfeiture of the head; i.e., death by beheading.[5] Decapitation by sword (or axe, a military weapon as well) was sometimes considered the "honorable" way to die for an aristocrat, who, presumably being a warrior, could often expect to die by the sword in any event; in England it was considered a privilege of noblemen to be beheaded. This would be distinguished from a "dishonorable" death on the gallows or through burning at the stake. In medieval England, high treason by nobles was punished by beheading; male commoner traitors, including knights, were hanged, drawn and quartered; female commoner traitors were burned at the stake."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beheading


A noble usage.

Thank you very much.
0 Replies
 
Joe Nation
 
  1  
Reply Thu 15 Dec, 2011 09:59 am
See also the French Revolution.

Joe( and look up what the Red Queen screams at Alice in Through the Looking Glass.)Nation
McTag
 
  1  
Reply Thu 15 Dec, 2011 11:15 am
@Joe Nation,

Ah, the good old days. They don't make nostalgia like that any more.
0 Replies
 
 

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