1
   

Is anyone else encrypting thier hard drives?

 
 
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Tue 27 Sep, 2011 11:03 am
@parados,
Quote:
If I need a password I don't have memorized I can simply access my home computer via VPN to access my encrypted file that contains my passwords. I don't save that password on my laptop.


Your system on it face is far weaker then mine as it is the total system that matter not any part of the system.

Your home server is setting there with what protection a door lock?

VPN is nice however when you set up the network using your laptop anyone with a sniffer running such as aircrack will know the ISP of your home computer and therefore should be able to locate it and have someone pay a visit and your security system will fall to a person carrying a lock pick.

Oh that is assuming they do not already know you and your home and was just waiting for you to leave for the airport with your laptop leaving you home computer completely open.
0 Replies
 
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Tue 27 Sep, 2011 11:24 am
@BillRM,
Quote:
Maybe the INC will have better luck this time around, since the first commercially available software to break TrueCrypt hard drive encryption without applying a time-consumindrivg brute-force attack has been released at the end of March?



LOL I am going to need to read reporters stories more carefully before posting them as all the new attacks on truecrypt concern running systems or a fast reboot within a minute or so of shutdown.

Hell most of them even with running lock systems need the system to have a firewire port.

There is no repeat no new attacks for dealing with a system shut down for a minute or so less alone drives long parted from their systems.
0 Replies
 
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Tue 27 Sep, 2011 01:20 pm
OK we had hear from all the people who had taken I do not need any such protection stand and one poor soul who think that a bios boot password grant him or her some real protection.

Now once more other then work is there anyone running encryption on their own personal systems but little old me on this website?

I know it is not all that uncommon as the truecrypt webpage for example reported to date 20 millions downloads of it current version 7.1

0 Replies
 
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Tue 27 Sep, 2011 02:28 pm
@parados,
Quote:
I'll bet you use wifi in public places.
I'll bet you type your password into your computer in public places where anyone with a decent cell phone can steal your password by simply taking a video.


Let see I sit down at random at a table in a pubic wifi place and there happen to be a person who know I am running truecrypt or think I might be doing so with one hell of a good camera phone to be able to get video clear enough to see my fat figures keying in my long password as I lean over the keyboard.

All without me taking note?????

Oh and then they somehow get a hold of my computer?

Sorry but even if bad guys do all this they still do not have access to my passwords because my passwords file is protected by being inside a truecrypt volume on the encrypted drive and I would have little reason to mount that volume in a public place!!!!!!!!!!!!

Oh it does not share the same pass phase with the WDE so the bad guys with their camera phones are still out of luck.........

Your example also happen to be way more of a risk model then I am likely to ever face in the real universe.

As far as using public wifi so what?

If I do so for anything more serous then postings on this website I either had a SSL connection and I also check the cert or I used a vpn or both.

Thomas
 
  1  
Reply Tue 27 Sep, 2011 04:32 pm
@BillRM,
BillRM wrote:
Now my first question is do you used wine to run windows tax programs or is there tax programs that will run under linux directly?

By now, Gnu Cash is doing a good-enough job as a tax program for me. It's not as smooth as Quicken, TurboTax, and WiSo (my German tax program) were, but it doesn't suck enough to get the Windows stuff running through Wine or VMware.

BillRM wrote:
Second question you are a linux user and still do not do backups?

I do backups, but they're at home, so they won't do me much good if the hard disk crashes while I'm traveling. And since travel tends to be the time when I drop running laptops to the floor etc, it's a pretty good bet that no backups are available when my hard disk crashes and I need to get to my data. As I said in an earlier post, it all comes down to balancing risks. The right balance for me doesn't have to be the right balance for you.
parados
 
  1  
Reply Tue 27 Sep, 2011 05:33 pm
@BillRM,
Quote:
Let see I sit down at random at a table in a pubic wifi place and there happen to be a person who know I am running truecrypt or think I might be doing so with one hell of a good camera phone to be able to get video clear enough to see my fat figures keying in my long password as I lean over the keyboard.

All without me taking note?????

Oh and then they somehow get a hold of my computer?

And you think it's more likely someone is going to get my home address from an IP that was temporarily assigned by my service provider? Why don't you pull another leg?

A DNS lookup shows what state I live in but the IP is assigned to my service provider, not me personally. I would say the odds are a lot better that someone can video your typing in a password than my home being targeted when my IP address could be one of 5 million homes. They don't need to know you are running Truecrypt. They only need to know what passwords you enter when your system starts up in order to duplicate your log in.

I just find it funny that you think someone randomly videoing your log in is substantially less likely than a random sniffer picking up my VPN packets. Now you are just pissing because you were tired of having dry shoes.

BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Tue 27 Sep, 2011 06:06 pm
@parados,
Quote:
substantially less likely than a random sniffer picking up my VPN packets. Now you are just pissing because you were tired of having dry shoes.


Let see there is last time I checked, sometimes ago. a million downloads of black sheep so sniffers are not at all uncommon with special note of airports and any place within a mile of a college campus.
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Tue 27 Sep, 2011 06:34 pm
@Thomas,
How are you going to repair your crash computer on vacation with or without the hard drive being encryption on vacation?

You are going to risk using a public computer in order to hook up to your home computer?

Now I had my password file up in the cloud also and on a memory stick on my keyring both of course encrypted so if something happen to my computer my problem would be the same as your finding a computer that I would not fear using.

Now I would likely to be far better off as my wife is likely to be along with one of her computers that also contain a encrypted copy of my password file and so I would have a computer I trust as must as my own and three copies of my passwords files available to me.

If my wife was not along I would likely just call and ask her to take over the task of monitoring and controlling the accounts until I got back.

There are clear advantages in marrying a woman you met online in 1985 and who would not go anywhere either without one of her own computers along.

0 Replies
 
parados
 
  1  
Reply Wed 28 Sep, 2011 11:46 am
@BillRM,
BillRM wrote:



Let see there is last time I checked, sometimes ago. a million downloads of black sheep so sniffers are not at all uncommon with special note of airports and any place within a mile of a college campus.


And that is dwarfed by the 300 million cell phones in the US and the 5 Billion cell phones in the world.
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Wed 28 Sep, 2011 09:07 pm
@parados,
Quote:
And that is dwarfed by the 300 million cell phones in the US and the 5 Billion cell phones in the world.


And that mean that wifi sniffers are uncommon because they are not as common as cell phones???!!!!???

You never took a course in logic now did you?
parados
 
  1  
Reply Thu 29 Sep, 2011 06:03 am
@BillRM,
Perhaps you should check YOUR logic Bill.

I never said that sniffers were "uncommon". I merely pointed out that cell phones are MORE common.
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Thu 29 Sep, 2011 06:11 am
@parados,
Quote:
I never said that sniffers were "uncommon". I merely pointed out that cell phones are MORE common.


So what.............????!!!!!!?????
parados
 
  1  
Reply Thu 29 Sep, 2011 06:50 am
@BillRM,
It is relevant when discussing which is more likely to happen. Or did you forget that part of the argument already?
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Thu 29 Sep, 2011 07:50 am
@parados,
More likely to happen that someone is going to made a phone call?

Oh you mean someone is going to have a cell phone camera and able to record my password being enter?

That comment was a clear as mud..........

In any case now I know what the hell you are referring or think I do there is no question that a sniffer is going to be able to record all ISP addresses connected to in an area over an open wifi however the likelihood that someone is going to be able to get a good enough video of my entering my password to do them any good all without me taking note of them doing so is remote to say the least.

Then there the the little problem come up for the cell phone attacker that the WDE password is only a layer of my security as my passwords file is still protected by a truecrypt volume that I do not mount in public.

parados
 
  1  
Reply Thu 29 Sep, 2011 08:17 am
@BillRM,
Whether it records all ISP addresses is meaningless since the ISP address won't give them my street address or even my city.

I repeat.. it is more likely someone will video your password than it is someone can find my street address using a sniffer program.
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Thu 29 Sep, 2011 09:02 am
@parados,
Of course there is no databases tying in addressses with locations.

ISPs addresses are either fix or slowly changing for the most part.



BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Thu 29 Sep, 2011 09:24 am
@BillRM,
I love you assuming that whoever have your isp address does not have access to the databases of locations also.

Some isps are fixed and some have a lease time of years and anyone who is running a home VPN would wish for a fixed isp or at least a long lasting one.
0 Replies
 
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Thu 29 Sep, 2011 09:44 am
@parados,
Quote:
the ISP address won't give them my street address or even my city
.

Pubic available sites give areas locations for ISPs such as your city.

Would you care to go to http://www.whatismyip.com/ and give me your current isp address shown to see if I can come up with the correct city for you?

parados
 
  1  
Reply Thu 29 Sep, 2011 09:58 am
@BillRM,
BillRM wrote:

Of course there is no databases tying in addressses with locations.

ISPs addresses are either fix or slowly changing for the most part.





And yet you earlier said someone could break into my house and steal my server based on sniffing my IP address?

Do you now agree that is highly unlikely?
0 Replies
 
parados
 
  1  
Reply Thu 29 Sep, 2011 10:02 am
@BillRM,
Quote:
Pubic available sites give areas locations for ISPs such as your city.

They are only as good as the info they can glean from the ISP. I checked it before I posted saying it only revealed the state I live in. You wouldn't get the correct city.
 

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