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Prepositions and the words they relate to each other

 
 
Reply Fri 16 Sep, 2011 12:00 am
do prepositions only relate nouns and pronouns to objects? is there another part of speech that we can relate to the object of the preposition?
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Type: Question • Score: 1 • Views: 1,907 • Replies: 11
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Lustig Andrei
 
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Reply Fri 16 Sep, 2011 02:01 am
@randallangala,
I remember being taught that a preposition shows relationship between two other words; no mention of nouns or pronouns, just 'words'. But, now that I think about it, it seems to mainly affect nouns.
roger
 
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Reply Fri 16 Sep, 2011 02:27 am
@Lustig Andrei,
I was once told that a preposition was anything a frog could do with a log. Jump off a log, swim to a log, etc.
Lustig Andrei
 
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Reply Fri 16 Sep, 2011 02:33 am
@roger,
You had a good, creative teacher, Roger.
roger
 
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Reply Fri 16 Sep, 2011 02:41 am
@Lustig Andrei,
Not only that, I knew what I had, when I had it. I usually spend a decade figuring these things out.
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Setanta
 
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Reply Fri 16 Sep, 2011 04:04 am
I believe Governor Perry intends to outlaw prepositions, so it's all moot, anyway.
JTT
 
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Reply Fri 16 Sep, 2011 02:02 pm
@roger,
Quote:
I was once told that a preposition was anything a frog could do with a log. Jump off a log, swim to a log, etc.


'eat' a log?
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Lustig Andrei
 
  1  
Reply Fri 16 Sep, 2011 08:37 pm
@Setanta,
Setanta wrote:

I believe Governor Perry intends to outlaw prepositions, so it's all moot, anyway.


Outlaw them? I didn't think he'd ever heard of them.
randallangala
 
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Reply Wed 21 Sep, 2011 03:41 am
@Lustig Andrei,
thanks for the input everyone. this is a related question, though even I feel it's a little nitpicky - if anyone has any input though, i'd welcome it. In sentences like: "We are in the building," does "in," relate "the building," to "we," or "are?". The most popular answer would probably be " we," but if a preposition can relate ANY word to another word and not just nouns or pronouns, couldn't one argue that the state of being verb "are," is being related by "in," to "the building," saying that this is the location where the state of being occurred.

Another example (this time with an action verb) is: "They danced in the room," Most people would say that "They," is being related by "in," to "the room," but one might say that the action verb: "danced," is what's being related to: "the room," saying that this is where the action occurred.

Does anyone have any thoughts?

Btw, who's gov.perry?
Lustig Andrei
 
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Reply Wed 21 Sep, 2011 07:33 pm
@randallangala,
Again, ithe word (preposition) "in" describes the relationship between "we" and "the building."

And whoever those people are that would say "they" is somehow related to anything in that sentence about dancing obviously don't understand the sentence or the function of a preposition. The two words that the preposition "in" connects are "dancing" and the "room."
randallangala
 
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Reply Thu 22 Sep, 2011 01:46 am
@Lustig Andrei,
So you mean that in example 1 (We are in the building) "in," relates "we," to "the building," but in sentence 2 (They are dancing in the room), "in," relates "dancing," to "the room?" Am I understanding it correctly? So, in sentence 1, "in," relates the subject to the object but in sentence 2, "in," relates the verb to the object, right? Is it because sentence 1 uses a state of being verb, while sentence 2 uses an action verb?

I'm not trying to debunk anyone or anything but am actually trying to come up with answers for overly inquisitive people I might speak to about this in the future. I'm trying to understand the why "in," relates the subject (we) to the object (the building) in sentence 1, while in sentence 2, it relates the verb (dancing) to the object (the room).
Lustig Andrei
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 Sep, 2011 08:55 pm
@randallangala,
It's immaterial what part of speech the referants to a preposition are. The preposition relates the words to each other. In sentence 1 "we" are in "the building." In sentence 2, there is "dancing" in "the room", regardless of who is actually doing this "dancing."
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