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The meaning of "Vale Constable and the Suckling " in this sentence

 
 
Infanta
 
Reply Mon 12 Sep, 2011 03:10 am
The borders of the Vale Constable and the Suckling are perhaps, in their way, as near perfection as could be reached.
I think the "borders" mean some decorations on book borders~
THX!
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Type: Question • Score: 4 • Views: 984 • Replies: 10
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Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Sep, 2011 03:12 am
@Infanta,
You have not provided enough context for a reasonable response, and i almost never waste my time searching for what ESL students have posted.
0 Replies
 
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Sep, 2011 03:24 am
@Infanta,
I am wondering if the Vale Constable refers to John Constable's painting "Dedham Vale". If so the borders may be the scenes at the border of the painting.

Can you give more context please?
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Sep, 2011 03:29 am
You may be right, but my response is based on the habit of this member throwing out some obscure snippet without sufficient context while apparently expecting some miracle to occur by which we will intuit her meaning and provide just the right answer. Most ESL people need to be reminded, apparently on a regular basis, to provide context for their questions.
roger
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Sep, 2011 03:38 am
@Setanta,
Ya know, if it were truely a reasonable language, we wouldn't need that context. Unfortunately. . . .
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Sep, 2011 03:40 am
@roger,
I would be very downhearted if it were a reasonable language. I support the idea of as many obscure and confusing langauges as possible--currencies and political parties, too.

Oh, and cuisines . . . the morer the betterer.
0 Replies
 
McTag
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Sep, 2011 04:46 am
@Infanta,

This appears to be a stupid question. The answer will be found in the text the quotation come from.
If it's about antiquarian books or bookbinding, then your supposition is correct.
spendius
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Sep, 2011 05:09 am
@McTag,
To think of "suckling" outside the context of an infant on the breast betrays a certain neuroticism I would have said. In that context the "vale" becomes self explanatory and the perfection goes without saying.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Sep, 2011 05:10 am
@dlowan,
Vale Press was a printer, for e.g. Sir John Suckling, Poems, Vale Press, 1896; Henry Constable, Poems and Sonnets, Vale Press, 1897 ...

dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Sep, 2011 05:51 am
@Walter Hinteler,
Yay!

I couldn't make sense of Suckling and Constable together!!!!
0 Replies
 
spendius
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Sep, 2011 06:23 am
@Walter Hinteler,
BTW Walt--why are facts sacred?
0 Replies
 
 

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