7
   

Am I slow or what?

 
 
Reply Sat 3 Sep, 2011 12:03 am
Please help me understand what TO BEG THE QUESTION means. I have looked it up and understand it is greatly misused, but I don't understand the explanation of what it means.
  • Topic Stats
  • Top Replies
  • Link to this Topic
Type: Question • Score: 7 • Views: 1,492 • Replies: 18
No top replies

 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Sat 3 Sep, 2011 12:57 am
@janinerene,
Whatever it refers to assumes facts not in evidence, or errors in the assumption of facts.

It specifically does not mean that that to which it refers to raises a question. The phrase is more often misused than not.
0 Replies
 
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Sat 3 Sep, 2011 03:34 am
@janinerene,
Begging the question is a type of "fallacy". A fallacy is an error of reasoning. To beg the question is to assume a proposition that, in reality, involves the conclusion - assuming as a fact something which you are trying to prove. It is often (some say erroneously) called "circular reasoning". There is a Latin name for the error, "petitio principii". It is called "begging the question" because the person who commits the error is "begging" the listener to accept the "question" (proposition) before the labour of logic is undertaken.

Examples:

Parallel lines will never meet, because they are parallel.

Bill: "God must exist."
Jill: "How do you know."
Bill: "Because the Bible says so."
Jill: "Why should I believe the Bible?"
Bill: "Because the Bible was written by God."

Interviewer: "Your resume looks impressive but I need another reference."
Bill: "Jill can give me a good reference."
Interviewer: "Good. But how do I know that Jill is trustworthy?"
Bill: "Certainly. I can vouch for her."






Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sat 3 Sep, 2011 04:59 am
The classic example of begging a question is "Have you stopped beating your wife?" There is a premise assumed here--that one beats one's wife--which has not been demonstrated. Whether the person questioned answers yes or no, that person accepts the premise that he beats his wife, or once did so. Good answers to such a question would be "I've never beaten my wife," or, simply, "I don't have a wife."

The question being begged is whether or not one beats one's wife. The question assumes that one does beat one's wife, even though no evidence has been presented.
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  0  
Reply Sat 3 Sep, 2011 11:46 am
@janinerene,
Quote:
Please help me understand what TO BEG THE QUESTION means. I have looked it up and understand it is greatly misused, but I don't understand the explanation of what it means.


No, you're not slow, Janinerine, but these pedants surely are though.

"greatly misused", what utter nonsense. Words, phrases and idioms mean what speakers of English say they mean. There are thousands of words and idioms whose meanings have changed over the centuries and these pedants aren't whining about those changes.

The most common meaning for 'beg the question' is 'raises the question' or 'demands that that question be asked'.

Doctors, lawyers, scientists, engineers, ... all have special meanings for words that are not used in everyday language.

Quote:
The meaning you give is the newest. It is gaining ground, and one or two recent dictionaries claim that it is now acceptable - the New Oxford Dictionary of English, for example, says it is “widely accepted in modern standard English”.

http://www.worldwidewords.org/qa/qa-beg1.htm



Quote:
beg the question
If a statement or situation begs the question, it causes you to ask a particular question
Spending the summer travelling round India is a great idea, but it does rather beg the question of how we can afford it.
To discuss the company's future begs the question whether it has a future.

http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/british/beg-the-question

0 Replies
 
StinkyPete
 
  -3  
Reply Mon 5 Sep, 2011 08:31 pm
Your freaking slow.

How about you pay attention in school dumbass?

This aint no tutoring seesion.
CalamityJane
 
  1  
Reply Mon 5 Sep, 2011 08:35 pm
@StinkyPete,
How about you going back to English 101?
Rockhead
 
  1  
Reply Mon 5 Sep, 2011 08:37 pm
@StinkyPete,
actually, this is a tutoring session...

Rolling Eyes
StinkyPete
 
  -3  
Reply Mon 5 Sep, 2011 08:37 pm
@CalamityJane,
Excuse me Mam, but how about you choke on my erect penis?

My English is fine, THANK YOU VERY MUCH.
StinkyPete
 
  -2  
Reply Mon 5 Sep, 2011 08:38 pm
@Rockhead,
ROCKY. My man!

Well, it shouldn't be.
0 Replies
 
Mame
 
  1  
Reply Mon 5 Sep, 2011 08:39 pm
@contrex,
Huh? How convoluted!

I agree with JTT.
0 Replies
 
Rockhead
 
  1  
Reply Mon 5 Sep, 2011 08:40 pm
@StinkyPete,
I don't think Jane eats pulled pork, stink...
StinkyPete
 
  -3  
Reply Mon 5 Sep, 2011 08:42 pm
@Rockhead,
Never said she did.

But she's about to eat hard dick.
Mame
 
  1  
Reply Mon 5 Sep, 2011 08:43 pm
@StinkyPete,
In your dreams, goof.
StinkyPete
 
  -3  
Reply Mon 5 Sep, 2011 08:44 pm
@Mame,
In my pants, bitch.
Mame
 
  1  
Reply Mon 5 Sep, 2011 08:45 pm
@StinkyPete,
What are you, 14? You're such a dweeb. But that's okay - lots of other dweebs like you around here.
StinkyPete
 
  -3  
Reply Mon 5 Sep, 2011 08:48 pm
@Mame,
What are you, 12? What the **** is dweeb?

You want some dick too Mame? All you gotta do is ask, babe. No need to get jealous and feisty on me.
Mame
 
  1  
Reply Mon 5 Sep, 2011 08:50 pm
@StinkyPete,
<YAWN>
StinkyPete
 
  -3  
Reply Mon 5 Sep, 2011 08:54 pm
@Mame,
Ha.

Oooo. She already got that mouth open for me.
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

deal - Question by WBYeats
Drs. = female doctor? - Question by oristarA
Let pupils abandon spelling rules, says academic - Discussion by Robert Gentel
Please, I need help. - Question by imsak
Is this sentence grammatically correct? - Question by Sydney-Strock
"come from" - Question by mcook
 
  1. Forums
  2. » Am I slow or what?
Copyright © 2021 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.07 seconds on 11/27/2021 at 02:16:37