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How high would wind speeds have to be to blow a 160-pound human being away?

 
 
jespah
 
  1  
Reply Sun 28 Aug, 2011 07:17 am
@Roberta,
BU = my alma mater, Boston University! Go Terriers!
http://images.wikia.com/nba/images/4/46/Boston_Terriers.jpg
0 Replies
 
rosborne979
 
  2  
Reply Sun 28 Aug, 2011 07:35 am
@kickycan,
kickycan wrote:
How high would wind speeds have to be to blow a 160-pound human being away?

It depends on how bit the kite you're holding onto is. Smile
0 Replies
 
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Sun 28 Aug, 2011 10:02 am
@kickycan,
Let see a skydiver reach steady state speed at around 120 MPH so his weight is balance at a wind speed of 120 MPH.

Now there is a square relationship between force and wind speed.

So very roughly a 60 mph wind speed would produce a force of 1/4 your body weight on you.
BillRM
 
  0  
Reply Mon 29 Aug, 2011 03:54 pm
@BillRM,
Quote:
Let see a skydiver reach steady state speed at around 120 MPH so his weight is balance at a wind speed of 120 MPH.

Now there is a square relationship between force and wind speed.

So very roughly a 60 mph wind speed would produce a force of 1/4 your body weight on you.


I love trying to figure out the mind set of someone who would vote down a post like the one above.

If someone had a disagreement with my logic/reasoning I would think off hand that the normal thing would be to post in what way I happen to had gone wrong.

This is not an emotional thread after all.
JTT
 
  0  
Reply Mon 29 Aug, 2011 04:30 pm
@BillRM,
Quote:
I love trying to figure out the mind set of someone who would vote down a post like the one above.


We agree on some things, Bill.
0 Replies
 
DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Mon 29 Aug, 2011 04:43 pm
So if Kicky got blown away, we may never know..... Sad
0 Replies
 
tsarstepan
 
  2  
Reply Mon 29 Aug, 2011 04:43 pm
@BillRM,
BillRM wrote:

Quote:
Let see a skydiver reach steady state speed at around 120 MPH so his weight is balance at a wind speed of 120 MPH.

Now there is a square relationship between force and wind speed.

So very roughly a 60 mph wind speed would produce a force of 1/4 your body weight on you.


I love trying to figure out the mind set of someone who would vote down a post like the one above.

If someone had a disagreement with my logic/reasoning I would think off hand that the normal thing would be to post in what way I happen to had gone wrong.

This is not an emotional thread after all.

I hear that there is a large deep sea-diver contingent here at a2k. That deep sea-divers are mortal enemies to skydivers around the world. With this hypothetical, you pushed someones wrong buttons.

You might have made a powerful enemy here at a2k. http://i52.tinypic.com/2zi7yfc.jpg
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Mon 29 Aug, 2011 05:18 pm
@tsarstepan,
Quote:
That deep sea-divers are mortal enemies to skydivers around the world. With this hypothetical, you pushed someones wrong buttons.


Lord so I have even more people disliking me because as a young man I was dumb enough to jump out of perfectly good aircrafts?

Oh talk about being a geek even when it came to skydiving I remember writing a program on the TI-59 programmable calculator to graph out the delta V and the forces involved in jumping before doing so.

Footnote the G shock of a chute opening can be express in mathematic terms but not the happiness when it occur and you then look up and see a good chute over your head.
0 Replies
 
 

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