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Choose just one artwork that you would love to own & live with indefinitely.

 
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Mon 13 Jun, 2011 05:47 am
@Sturgis,
Quote:
Maybe I'll just take a Manet, he wasn't bad either...then again there was that Van Gogh item I really liked.
Nah, stick with Pissarro.

I'll get back to you if I ever reach a decision.

Any closer to a decision, Sturgis?
We're waiting, you know! Wink
0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  2  
Reply Mon 13 Jun, 2011 06:21 am
@Eva,
Indeed, Eva.
Luminous.
And so romantic!
And look at how beautifully he's painted the folds of her clothing!

Quote:
...... Here is another one that I love just as much, although it is not known quite as well. It's "The Painter's Honeymoon" by Lord Frederick Leighton (1864). The colors are luminous, the textures perfect, the composition flawless. I fell in love with this painting the first time I saw it, and I am still entranced.

http://www.oilpaintings-art.com/Movement/big/Leighton-9.jpg


... your choice made me wonder if you're a "fan" of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood, too.
Very romantic paintings, full of exquisite details, too.
Years ago, I was quite taken with the Pre-Raphaelites ... as much about the wild & dramatic stories about them as their artworks. A very dashing & adventurous group in their time!

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-CrQXNEcH5bg/TWFwc522UrI/AAAAAAAAATs/i4fmHsMBGtA/s1600/JWW_TheLadyOfShallot_1888.jpg
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Lady_of_Shalott

This one (below), Millais's Ophelia was a particular favourite.
The sheer drama of it!
Or melodrama,if you like, take your pick.
And the poor model, who had to pose for hours in Millais's bath, so he could achieve exactly the effects he was after in the painting!

There's a strategically placed bench in front of Ophelia at the Tate Gallery in London, for people to sit & take in the details for hours.
I spent quite a bit of time on that bench years ago.
Loved it.

http://www.tate.org.uk/ophelia/images/ophelia.jpg



msolga
 
  1  
Reply Mon 13 Jun, 2011 06:30 am
I'd better stop now, because I want to comment on so many of the artworks you've posted.
Which could become a bit boring to anyone reading this thread.
I'm hoping, though, that there'll be quite a few more posts here yet.
0 Replies
 
saab
 
  2  
Reply Mon 13 Jun, 2011 06:38 am
Msolga, maybe you would like to know why I choose Krøyer?
He belongs to a group called the The Skagen Painters a group of Scandinavian artists who gathered in the area of Skagen, the northernmost part of Denmark, from the late 1870s until the turn of the century. Skagen was a summer destination whose scenery and quality of light attracted northern artists
Skagen, in the very north of Jutland, was the largest fishing community in Denmark.
I like the light in his paintings, the calmness and the water. I also like the paintings with people - a lady reading under a tree, a Danish family garthering.
I can imagen the food and the laughter.
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Mon 13 Jun, 2011 06:49 am
@saab,
I hadn't heard of the Skagen Painters before your post, saab.
In fact I know very little about Scandinavian art at all (apart from film).
I think it's time to find out more!
I really like the light & shadows in this one:

https://www.reproarte.com/files/images/K/kroyer_peter_severin/sommertag_am_strand_von_skagen.jpg
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  2  
Reply Mon 13 Jun, 2011 07:15 am
@saab,
the work is neat . Ive only seen one Krayer in my life and it was in Ireland several years ago.
When I was doing my studio art degree (many years ago), the U of Del profs would have us sketch (for landscape painting) the arrangements of the pre Raphealites like Rosetti at the Wilmington Del Art Museum. They have a huge Pre-Raph collection and I found it a bit sappy. I learned to hate it after one semester of painting and sketching Rosettis.
msolga
 
  2  
Reply Mon 13 Jun, 2011 07:24 am
@farmerman,
Quote:
When I was doing my studio art degree (many years ago), the U of Del profs would have us sketch (for landscape painting) the arrangements of the pre Raphealites like Rosetti at the Wilmington Del Art Museum. They have a huge Pre-Raph collection and I found it a bit sappy. I learned to hate it after one semester of painting and sketching Rosettis.

Yeah, I'm sure there are many people, farmer, who find Pre-Raphaelite paintings sappy, wet, melodramatic, etc, etc, etc ...
You would definitely not be alone in your response.
Me, I like them for those very same reasons. (don't ask me to explain that at this time of night! Wink )
And I love the stories about them!
They were kind of crazy & interesting!
Still, if someone made me spend a semester doing what you were required to do, I might feel exactly the same!
0 Replies
 
saab
 
  2  
Reply Mon 13 Jun, 2011 07:41 am
The light on the west coast of Sweden is fascinating just like at Skagen in Denmark and there is a group called Halmstad gruppen - no one is alive anymore. Some of there art below. Now I show this as I like the west coast very much myself.
http://www.google.de/search?q=halmstadgruppen&hl=de&biw=1024&bih=593&site=webhp&prmd=ivns&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=fBH2TZHwBYT1-gbk5tT9Bg&sqi=2&ved=0CDEQsAQ

Then there is a Norwegian Hans Dahl and once I inherited a large painting by him. I really did not like it. A small boat on a stormy day. I called it the Sea sick painting and sold it on an auction. On this auction was also a small Picasso which I liked. I did not want to spend any money, which I did not have anyway so I was only going to pay what the Dahl could get. First was the Picasso auctioned off and I bid till the amount which the Dahl probably would get.
Then a few pictures later my Dahl was auctioned off for the double prize of what Picasso went for.
There went my chance to have a real Picasso in my house.
0 Replies
 
chai2
 
  3  
Reply Mon 13 Jun, 2011 08:12 am
Here we go, here's the one....

http://rookery.s3.amazonaws.com/1151000/1151163_6a38_625x1000.jpg
Thomas
 
  3  
Reply Mon 13 Jun, 2011 08:36 am
@msolga,
msolga wrote:
I like how the sea is framed by the white cliffs & the ornate branches ....
but what is actually happening in the picture?

A party of hikers is looking out at the sea, without giving a damn about you, the viewer of the picture. In the more conventional pictures of Friedrich's time, this family would have been facing you, and you would be able to see their faces. But Friedrich didn't care about people---not about the people in the picture, not about the people looking at them. The only thing Friedrich cared about was landscapes, and the only role of humans, inside or outside of the picture, was to look at them. It's a slap in the face of his period's viewing conventions.

msolga wrote:
I'm also interested to know more about your reasons for choosing this particular painting. Does it hold some important meaning for you?

I just like Caspar David Friedrich's landscapes, and his attitude about them.
djjd62
 
  2  
Reply Mon 13 Jun, 2011 08:41 am
@chai2,
mona needs to work on her poker face, she looks like she has a good hand
0 Replies
 
Thomas
 
  1  
Reply Mon 13 Jun, 2011 08:43 am
@Roberta,
Roberta wrote:
Second, David (as in King David) is from the Old Testament--a nice Jewish boy.
Thoid, The statue ain't in Rome. It's in Florence at the Museum of the Academy.

Otherwise your post was spot on poifect.

Touché! "Almost perfect" is good enough for me.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Mon 13 Jun, 2011 08:59 am
@Thomas,
I just want to add the Friedrich was the "inventor" of the 'Romantism' (Romantik) in paintings. (My year's paper when I was in 9 ['Untersekunda' if Thomas knows what that is Wink ])
Eva
 
  2  
Reply Mon 13 Jun, 2011 09:34 am
@msolga,
Re: Pre-Raphaelites...love the colors, the precision, the romance...but not the melodrama. Leighton was a contemporary of the PRB (and probably influenced by them) but had his own style. The painting I chose has all the traits I admire in the Pre-Raphaelites without the fake medieval references and the melodrama.

I love how the woman is so absorbed in watching what her man is creating. Art is usually a solitary pursuit. This shows the desire to share that process...a desire of many artists that is rarely fulfilled.
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Mon 13 Jun, 2011 06:10 pm
@Thomas,
Thank you for your response, Thomas.
I always loved a convention breaker. Smile
And that was quite a convention to break.
I imagine the first showings of his landscapes would have cause quite a reaction!
I think I'll take another good look at that painting now.

Quote:
I just like Caspar David Friedrich's landscapes, and his attitude about them.

Yes, I can see why.


0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Mon 13 Jun, 2011 06:24 pm
@Eva,
Yes indeed, Pre-Raphaelite paintings are not everyone's cup of tea, Eva.
I really enjoy contemplating the symbolism of the medieval & other references.
Call me strange. Wink
Quote:
The painting I chose has all the traits I admire in the Pre-Raphaelites without the fake medieval references and the melodrama.

I love how the woman is so absorbed in watching what her man is creating. Art is usually a solitary pursuit. This shows the desire to share that process...a desire of many artists that is rarely fulfilled.

I didn't realize, not knowing nearly as much about that painting as you, that he was in the process of creating his own artwork, assuming he was writing something at his desk.
Sharing the process ... that's quite moving.
I really like the interlocking hands.
Thanks for posting more on the painting, Eva. I think I understand it better from reading your words.
0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Mon 13 Jun, 2011 06:28 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Walter, I'm not sure if you've posted about your chosen artwork yet.
I'll have to go back & check to know for sure.
But if you haven't yet, I really hope you do!


Roberta, have you chosen your 2011 painting yet?
You were seriously contemplating a Monet yesterday.
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  3  
Reply Mon 13 Jun, 2011 07:45 pm
@chai2,
    http://rookery.s3.amazonaws.com/1151000/1151163_6a38_625x1000.jpg

Who's da bitch?
0 Replies
 
wrigley2013
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 Sep, 2013 02:31 am
@shewolfnm,
In my option,I love to looking it at times,that have a freshness .
0 Replies
 
iamsam82
 
  1  
Reply Fri 1 Aug, 2014 04:20 pm
@shewolfnm,
http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-5Kz1CeVW7lE/UbWzC_tO7HI/AAAAAAAAXls/W9hapLzx-fc/s1600/susannah_hayez.jpg

No need to comment. Just look at it; at her, really. It's all in the eyes. What a look.
0 Replies
 
 

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