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Choose just one artwork that you would love to own & live with indefinitely.

 
 
Ceili
 
  2  
Reply Sat 11 Jun, 2011 11:32 pm
@msolga,
I think I'd choose something by Louis Tiffany and instead of hanging it on a wall, I prefer the play of light and reflections.
http://www.reinarts.com/images/recent%20projects/MarineArtWinonaMN/Tiffany-postcard-sm.jpg
http://picamericakids.edublogs.org/files/2009/08/13b_tiffany_autumn_landscape.jpg
tsarstepan
 
  2  
Reply Sat 11 Jun, 2011 11:52 pm
@Ceili,
Ceili? I bet you would have loved this gorgeous exhibition in the Metropolitan Museum.
http://www.metmuseum.org/special/se_event.asp?OccurrenceId={5D70EF2E-38E2-4F9C-95A4-7582FE0A9B84}
Louis Comfort Tiffany and Laurelton Hall—An Artist’s Country Estate
November 21, 2006–May 20, 2007
Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Exhibition Hall, 2nd floor

Went there with Eurodiva and a friend of hers from England.
Ceili
 
  1  
Reply Sun 12 Jun, 2011 12:09 am
@tsarstepan,
I fell in love with his work when I visited the Met. Thanks for the link tsar.
0 Replies
 
Roberta
 
  2  
Reply Sun 12 Jun, 2011 01:41 am
olga, On the original thread, I chose View of Toledo by El Greco.

http://www.oilpainting-frame.com/upload1/file-admin/images/new21/El%20Greco-789525.jpg

I still love this painting, but I don't know whether it would be my choice now.

You've included sculpture now. My favorite work of art in the world is Michelangelo's David. Granted, I would have to raise the ceiling and reinforce the floor in my apartment, but I could live with it.

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_pzYLUtopxiA/TJoYo7Gm5RI/AAAAAAAAfMA/d3ilY6ANQ-4/s1600/michelangelo-sculptures-13.jpg

You want to know why I would choose this, don't you?

First, it's breathtakingly beautiful. When I walked into the room that contains the statue, my eyes filled with tears. Such beauty. The work is also an enigma, in a way. As you look at it from different angles, you see a different person in the sculture. A young innocent man. A warrior. A strong man. Etc. When I was viewing the work, I had to touch it. Had to! My friend was the lookout while I snuck a touch.

What painting would I choose now? Gotta think.

msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sun 12 Jun, 2011 02:12 am
@Roberta,
Breathtakingly beautiful is hard to beat, I've got to admit, Roberta.
Quote:
When I walked into the room that contains the statue, my eyes filled with tears. Such beauty. The work is also an enigma, in a way. As you look at it from different angles, you see a different person in the sculture. A young innocent man. A warrior. A strong man. Etc. When I was viewing the work, I had to touch it. Had to! My friend was the lookout while I snuck a touch.


I can so relate to your feeling of needing to touch,Roberta.

The best sculptures call out for touch!

I'll be very interested in your 2011 choice of painting!
msolga
 
  2  
Reply Sun 12 Jun, 2011 03:10 am
@msolga,
OK, as much as l loved the soothing effects of Monet's waterlilies in 2004 (& still do) it is time to move on.

Like Roberta, I am going for a sculpture this time: Brancusi's Kiss
http://www.artchive.com/artchive/b/brancusi/kiss_1912.jpg

Why?
Because I find it amusing, yet kind of serious at the same time.
Two figures welded together (their eyeballs, arms & lips are one!) , in love or lust. Take your pick ....
The only way we can tell one of them is female is the slight bulge in her body. Denoting "female".
Anyway, I find this a delightful & charming piece.
I think I could get quite a bit of fun, say nothing of admiration for the sculptor, by meditating on it for quite some time!
0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sun 12 Jun, 2011 06:24 am
@ossobuco,
Quote:
I'm not ready to pick a new piece.
I love one of my own paintings, but, so what?

You can choose one of your own pieces if you like, osso.
Up to you.
0 Replies
 
boomerang
 
  3  
Reply Sun 12 Jun, 2011 09:23 am
Without going back to look at the old thread I'll wager that my answer is the same now as it was then: Sargent's "The Daughters of Edward Darley Boit"

http://www.theworld.org/wp-content/uploads/thedaughters466.jpg

I can't really explain why I like it so much but I've been fascinated with it since I first saw it. I think it's because I like the light so much.
shewolfnm
 
  2  
Reply Sun 12 Jun, 2011 09:31 am
http://frysingerreunion.org/gc09/slovenia015.jpg

This would be an example of a piece of artwork I would live with forever.
Not the photo.. the actual castle.

Look at the landscape... and how deliberately the castle was placed in the middle of that to compliment the scene, not take away from .
Just.. beautiful..
0 Replies
 
firefly
 
  2  
Reply Sun 12 Jun, 2011 10:40 am
http://www.picturalissim.com/t/monet_garden_at_sainte_adresse_l.jpg
Garden at Sainte-Adresse, Claude Monet 1867

I never tire of looking at this painting. I had a large beautifully framed print on my office wall for many years, and, each time I looked at it, I was immediately transported into that beautiful bright summer day, the colorful lush garden, and could almost feel the breeze coming off the sea. I love the emotional uplift of the light and strong colors in the foreground, and the infinite stretch of sea and sky beyond, and the feeling of serenity and harmony the entire scene evokes in me. And the fact that figures are seated with their back to the viewer makes them more interesting to me in terms of the composition. But, having said all of that, I'm still not sure that I've captured why this particular painting gives me so much pleasure.

When I moved, the print was dropped and the glass shattered and both the frame and print were damaged. I was heartbroken. I really missed having this painting, or at least a facsimile of it, in my life. I really love it. I'm currently doing some re-decorating in my home and, if I can find a good enough print, I think I may have it framed for my guest room so I, and my guests, can enjoy it again.
0 Replies
 
tsarstepan
 
  3  
Reply Sun 12 Jun, 2011 10:56 am
@boomerang,
boomerang? Have you the pleasure of actually seeing this iconic Sargent's painting up close? It's one of my favorite paintings at the Boston MFA http://www.mfa.org/collections/object/vase-with-decoration-of-birds-and-flowers-45817 along with John Singleton Copley's Watson and the Shark.
http://zoom.mfa.org/fif=sc2/sc236724.fpx&obj=iip,1.0&wid=568&cell=568,427&cvt=jpeg
0 Replies
 
Green Witch
 
  4  
Reply Sun 12 Jun, 2011 11:25 am
Any Vermeer, Burne-Jones, F. Church or Rembrandt would probably due, but his painting by Hendrick Avercamp made a strong impact on me as a child, so it has a special place in my soul:

http://www.ibiblio.org/wm/paint/auth/avercamp/rijks-winter-landscape/rijks-winter-landscape.jpg
0 Replies
 
Green Witch
 
  1  
Reply Sun 12 Jun, 2011 11:26 am
Oops. I somehow picked one that is almost life-sized. Sorry about that.
ossobuco
 
  2  
Reply Sun 12 Jun, 2011 11:36 am
I have long liked the Bay Area Figurative group - Diebenkorn, Bishoff, and so on -
I was looking up Bishoff for a painting to show, and ran across this one by Paul Wonner, who I'd not heard of before. It has a lot of elements I like - a certain 'dailyness', vigor of paint strokes, a certain carelessness - or apparent carelessness - that works for me.

http://imgs.sfgate.com/c/pictures/2004/07/06/dd_artnotes.jpg
Paul Wonner's "In the Park II" (2002) revives his early style, describing scenes of ordinary leisure with a lack of obvious drama.
0 Replies
 
wandeljw
 
  3  
Reply Sun 12 Jun, 2011 11:38 am
Gustav Caillebotte's "Paris Street, Rainy Day" would be my choice. This painting fills an entire wall at Chicago's Art Institute. Every time I visit the art institute, I sit on a bench in front of the painting and feel transported into it.

http://www.ibiblio.org/wm/paint/auth/caillebotte/rainy.jpg
ossobuco
 
  2  
Reply Sun 12 Jun, 2011 02:16 pm
@wandeljw,
Yeah, I love that painting. Bought a terrific book on him after I saw that painting..
I also love his Rooftops Under Snow - no picture since most of those I click on are reproductions.

edit - this one seems to be of the painting itself -
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3459/5753020408_ae4d3af98a.jpg
http://elizabethfloydstudio.blogspot.com/2011/05/artist-review-gustave-caillebotte.html
0 Replies
 
djjd62
 
  4  
Reply Sun 12 Jun, 2011 02:27 pm
i've always loved the Breughel's (elder and younger), and the fact that Auden wrote a poem about one of my faves makes it an easy choice

http://www.merryswankster.com/archives/fall%20of%20icarus.jpg
"Fall of Icarus" by Breughel

Musee des Beaux Artes
WH Auden

About suffering they were never wrong,
The Old Masters; how well, they understood
Its human position; how it takes place
While someone else is eating or opening a window or just walking dully along;
How, when the aged are reverently, passionately waiting
For the miraculous birth, there always must be
Children who did not specially want it to happen, skating
On a pond at the edge of the wood:
They never forgot
That even the dreadful martyrdom must run its course
Anyhow in a corner, some untidy spot
Where the dogs go on with their doggy life and the torturer's horse
Scratches its innocent behind on a tree.
In Breughel's Icarus, for instance: how everything turns away
Quite leisurely from the disaster; the ploughman may
Have heard the splash, the forsaken cry,
But for him it was not an important failure; the sun shone
As it had to on the white legs disappearing into the green
Water; and the expensive delicate ship that must have seen
Something amazing, a boy falling out of the sky,
had somewhere to get to and sailed calmly on.
tsarstepan
 
  2  
Reply Sun 12 Jun, 2011 03:12 pm
@djjd62,
Even if that painting wasn't about the fall of Icarus, its still a very good painting.

I love the way the plow is overturning the ground like its slicing through leather. I love that the rocky outcropping in the midground has a cave entrance. I love how the shepard has stopped just to look up at something or perhaps to daydream.

The fact that there are two legs (and an unseen body) plunging into the ocean is both comic and tragic. That hardly anyone notices or truly is moved by this event (in the painting) makes this an astounding painting.
0 Replies
 
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Sun 12 Jun, 2011 06:37 pm
@djjd62,
Lovely!

The texture of the ploughed earth is wonderful.
0 Replies
 
Thomas
 
  3  
Reply Sun 12 Jun, 2011 06:42 pm
@Roberta,
Roberta wrote:
http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_pzYLUtopxiA/TJoYo7Gm5RI/AAAAAAAAfMA/d3ilY6ANQ-4/s1600/michelangelo-sculptures-13.jpg

You want to know why I would choose this, don't you?

Let me guess: You're a closet Catholic, and you want this artifact from St Peter's dome to connect to your spiritual side.
 

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