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Choose just one artwork that you would love to own & live with indefinitely.

 
 
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Sun 12 Jun, 2011 06:59 pm
@Thomas,
That's low Thomas! Confused That's like calling her a closet Red Sox fan. Though if the latter was true, I'd welcome her into the Red Sox Nation. No strings attached. Very Happy
dlowan
 
  2  
Reply Sun 12 Jun, 2011 07:03 pm
@Green Witch,
Green Witch wrote:

Oops. I somehow picked one that is almost life-sized. Sorry about that.


Sorry?

It's wonderful!

Viewing good quality images on an iPad is fantastic...you can enlarge as much as you want instantly. I played with that painting for ages....as I have done with great joy with many of the others

This thread is a treasure
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 12 Jun, 2011 07:07 pm
@dlowan,
Time to mention I loved the Breugel too - such a cool painter so early.
djjd62
 
  2  
Reply Sun 12 Jun, 2011 07:39 pm
@ossobuco,
i first came to love bruegel through my love for canadian artist william kurelek
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Kurelek
http://www.artgalleryofhamilton.com/images/ex/Kurelek-William-Polish-Wedding.jpg
when i was a teen i'd read how some of kurelek's scenes of ukranian people on the prairies, were reminiscent of bruegel's peasant scenes (especially when both artist were depicting people gathering or partying)
Sturgis
 
  2  
Reply Sun 12 Jun, 2011 07:50 pm
@msolga,
msolga wrote:
Question: if you could choose just one art work (be it a painting, sculpture, photograph, whatever...) that you could have in your personal presence indefinitely, what would you choose?

And what reasons would you give for that choice?


It's a toss-up between just about anything by Pissar
ro, for some reason I always feel happier when viewing his stuff and then there's the de Hirsch Margules side of thinking. Margules is more a sentimental favorite for 2 reasons (there'd be 3 but that's another story). He was in my grandfather's circle of acquainti (acquaiti?) and he gave 2 of his works to either my grandfather or both my grandparents (I'm fuzzy on that). I still have the Washington Square Park piece, it's good and bad, It is clear what it is, but fails in deeper detail. It may have been an early work as he later went in other directions.
the piece with 2 moons at dockside was lost in the great apartment give-away of 1985 (along with several 78 phonograph records).

So I'm torn between sentimentality and its ability for elation and the work of a man that created art which elates me without any sentimental ties.


Maybe I'll just take a Manet, he wasn't bad either...then again there was that Van Gogh item I really liked.
Nah, stick with Pissarro.

I'll get back to you if I ever reach a decision.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 12 Jun, 2011 07:56 pm
@djjd62,
Interesting personally to me.

Long ago I took dozens of studio art classes. They soothed my soul, or something like that. I took advanced painting six times, to give you an idea of my interest in that experience. (It was around then I was losing interest in being a lab tech.) Somewhere around the fourth of those sets of classes, as my canvases became 4 x 5 feet, I started painting not the model but the whole class, fairly fast.

I don't know the relevance of this re painters through the ages - there are plenty of large scenes from long ago. Maybe it's not a progressive process but one of original interest.
0 Replies
 
Eva
 
  2  
Reply Sun 12 Jun, 2011 09:30 pm
I am loving this thread! But I'm finding it impossible to narrow my choices to only one artwork. I just can't do it.

Botticelli's "Birth of Venus" would certainly be on my short list, along with Renoir's "Luncheon of the Boating Party," Henri Rousseau's "The Dream," and several other famous paintings. Here is another one that I love just as much, although it is not known quite as well. It's "The Painter's Honeymoon" by Lord Frederick Leighton (1864). The colors are luminous, the textures perfect, the composition flawless. I fell in love with this painting the first time I saw it, and I am still entranced.

http://www.oilpaintings-art.com/Movement/big/Leighton-9.jpg
Thomas
 
  2  
Reply Sun 12 Jun, 2011 10:06 pm
Here's mine: Caspar David Friedrich: Kreidefelsen auf Rügen

http://i286.photobucket.com/albums/ll88/guthobla/kreidefelsen-auf-ruegen.jpg
Roberta
 
  1  
Reply Sun 12 Jun, 2011 11:36 pm
@Thomas,
Thomas,

Foist of all, I ain't no closet nuttin'.
Second, David (as in King David) is from the Old Testament--a nice Jewish boy.
Thoid, The statue ain't in Rome. It's in Florence at the Museum of the Academy.

Otherwise your post was spot on poifect.

Roberta
 
  1  
Reply Sun 12 Jun, 2011 11:37 pm
@tsarstepan,
Dream on, Bean Town boy. Not gonna happen. Ever.
0 Replies
 
saab
 
  2  
Reply Mon 13 Jun, 2011 01:08 am
I have some paintings I have liked for years - even from my childhood.
Preferable I want a painting with water. My favorite would be
Peter S. Kröyer a Danish painter.
https://www.reproarte.com/files/images/K/kroyer_peter_severin/sommertag_am_strand_von_skagen.jpg

https://www.reproarte.com/files/images/K/kroyer_peter_severin/kroyer_badende_knaben.jpg
There are some Swedish painters I like very much too.
If I were to choose one of my paintings and had to get rid of all the others I would probably choose a Japanese silkpainting. It is from underwater and with fish that you barely can see. The painter is Okunu.

When I was about 3 years old I saw following painting in a magazin and I liked it so much, that my mother framed it for me. It has hung by my bed ever since. I still like it, but not of religious reasons, but just because I like it.
Guess it just has to do with childhood.

http://www.google.de/imgres?imgurl=http://www.the-athenaeum.org/art/display_image.php%3Fid%3D81411&imgrefurl=http://www.the-athenaeum.org/art/full.php%3FID%3D38374&usg=__sYaoY15HKxHw6u1YlFHoSK70nU4=&h=655&w=639&sz=41&hl=de&start=0&zoom=1&tbnid=oxqyEGDhbhke8M:&tbnh=144&tbnw=136&ei=zrb1TZG8LIeHswbzh6CiBg&prev=/search%3Fq%3DFilippo%2Blippi%26um%3D1%26hl%3Dde%26sa%3DG%26biw%3D1024%26bih%3D593%26tbm%3Disch&um=1&itbs=1&iact=hc&vpx=761&vpy=74&dur=1214&hovh=227&hovw=222&tx=148&ty=117&page=1&ndsp=20&ved=1t:429,r:6,s:0&biw=1024&bih=593
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Mon 13 Jun, 2011 01:27 am
@saab,
This might help, saab:

Quote:
I have some paintings I have liked for years - even from my childhood.
Preferable I want a painting with water. My favorite would be
Peter S. Kröyer a Danish painter.:

https://www.reproarte.com/files/images/K/kroyer_peter_severin/sommertag_am_strand_von_skagen.jpg

https://www.reproarte.com/files/images/K/kroyer_peter_severin/kroyer_badende_knaben.jpg


Quote:

When I was about 3 years old I saw following painting in a magazin and I liked it so much, that my mother framed it for me. It has hung by my bed ever since. I still like it, but not of religious reasons, but just because I like it.
Guess it just has to do with childhood.:
http://www.the-athenaeum.org/art/display_image.php?id=81411
0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Mon 13 Jun, 2011 02:00 am
I'm trying (not too successfully) to do a quick catch-up on what's been posted here today while I cook dinner.
There are some fascinating choices here!
I'm really enjoying making the connections between the artworks & the A2Kers who chose them, too. Very interesting.

Any of you who aren't regular posters to the art threads here & who might be checking out this thread, you are very welcome to post, too, of course.
In fact it would be great if you did!
Don't be shy.
If you need an official invitation, or anything like that ....
Then I'm officially inviting you, OK? Smile
0 Replies
 
saab
 
  2  
Reply Mon 13 Jun, 2011 02:31 am
Plese help me make into a picture. Still don´t know how to do it.

I think the old Greek statues look so much better the way they looked originally than just white as we see them today. As a statue I would not mind to have one colored, but not a pure white one.
http://www.ub.edu/las_nubes/autores/image002.jpg
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Mon 13 Jun, 2011 02:38 am
@saab,
Here you go, saab.
(It's really easy.
One day when we both have enough time, I'm happy to show you how to do it online. Or post you a PM with directions if you'd prefer. Just let me know, OK?)

http://www.ub.edu/las_nubes/autores/image002.jpg
Roberta
 
  2  
Reply Mon 13 Jun, 2011 04:38 am
olga, I'm still pondering the painting. There are many I love, but wouldn't want hanging on my wall in my living room. Too intense.

I may end up with a Monet.
0 Replies
 
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Mon 13 Jun, 2011 04:47 am
@msolga,
Oh cool. Saw that, amongst other coloured statues at the Pergamon in Berlin!

It's fascinating looking at the research....but they look garish to my eyes.
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Mon 13 Jun, 2011 05:28 am
@dlowan,
Wasn't the Parthenon painted razzmatazz colours, too?
I think, if my memory serves me right, it was.
Kinda changes the way you look at classical art, doesn't it?
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Mon 13 Jun, 2011 05:28 am
@dlowan,
dlowan wrote:

Oh cool. Saw that, amongst other coloured statues at the Pergamon in Berlin!


That expedition is touring through Germany (and Europe) since 2003. (Was 2007/8 in the USA)
0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Mon 13 Jun, 2011 05:43 am
@Thomas,
Thomas, can you tell us more about this painting you chose?
English translation: Chalk Cliffs on Rügen

I like how the sea is framed by the white cliffs & the ornate branches ....
but what is actually happening in the picture?

Guessing: sight-seers on a day's outing?
But is that man in black looking for something which was lost?
The woman seems to be pointing toward something, too.
Or perhaps they're botanists, or something, and they're on some field mission?

I could do a Wikipedia check, but it would be much more interesting hearing what you have to say.

I'm also interested to know more about your reasons for choosing this particular painting. Does it hold some important meaning for you?

I hope that's not asking too many questions? Smile

Quote:
Here's mine: Caspar David Friedrich: Kreidefelsen auf Rügen

http://i286.photobucket.com/albums/ll88/guthobla/kreidefelsen-auf-ruegen.jpg
 

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