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Roman shipwreck: Giant fish tank in a 2,000-year-old ship?

 
 
Reply Sat 4 Jun, 2011 11:21 am
The hull of the Grado Roman shipwreck. The second-century ship spanned some 55 feet and held what scientists believe was a large, saltwater fish tank.

For the rest of the article:
http://www.csmonitor.com/Science/2011/0603/Roman-shipwreck-Giant-fish-tank-in-a-2-000-year-old-ship
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Type: Discussion • Score: 9 • Views: 1,901 • Replies: 11
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littlek
 
  1  
Reply Sat 4 Jun, 2011 11:29 am
@tsarstepan,
Amazing!
0 Replies
 
Reyn
 
  1  
Reply Sat 4 Jun, 2011 11:34 am
@tsarstepan,
Quote:
They estimate an aquarium behind the mast of the ship could have measured about 11.4 feet by 6.5 feet by 3.3 feet (3.5 m by 2 m by 1 m) for a capacity of approximately 250 cubic feet (7 cubic meters). For comparison, an average bathtub has a volume of about 7 cubic feet. If properly maintained, it could help keep at least 440 pounds (200 kg) of live fish such as sea bass or sea bream, they noted.

Wow, that's some big fish tank! Shocked
0 Replies
 
talk72000
 
  2  
Reply Sat 4 Jun, 2011 11:37 am
@tsarstepan,
http://www.livescience.com/images/i/17000/original/ship-hydraulic-system.jpg?1307019577

Could be a fish merchant.
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sat 4 Jun, 2011 04:38 pm
@tsarstepan,
and the boat wasnt fiberglas I imagine, so the tank would displace a lot more water than a live bait well or live fish tank that are in bass boaqts or deep sea fishin boats.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sat 4 Jun, 2011 04:48 pm
@tsarstepan,
Wow. Thanks for the thread, Tsar.

Not having read the link yet, I suppose that was a very practical tank..
makes me wonder, though, about the possibility of less practical ones, in palaces. Though maybe they had practical ones in palaces too.

Which brings up that I don't know nuttin about the history of glass.
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Sat 4 Jun, 2011 04:55 pm
@ossobuco,
I don't believe it was made of glass for aesthetic study of the fish but a storage container to keep the fish alive in lieu of the lack of refrigeration tech one needs to preserve fish after being caught in mass by trade fishermen.

The speculation was to transport the live fish for a live fish trade back in the trading cities.
Ionus
 
  2  
Reply Sat 4 Jun, 2011 07:36 pm
@tsarstepan,
The Romans also built a special salt water aqueduct to keep sea fish alive at markets in Rome . How they transported the live fish inland to Rome is not known . Perhaps a river boat like the one mentioned ?
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Sat 4 Jun, 2011 07:41 pm
@Ionus,
I was unaware of the fish market architecture. Thanks for the fact drop Ionus.
roger
 
  1  
Reply Sat 4 Jun, 2011 08:36 pm
@tsarstepan,
I think farmerman had it. A really big bait well.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sat 4 Jun, 2011 08:48 pm
@tsarstepan,
I don't believe it was made of glass either, sorry if it sounded like I did.

I was just off wondering. I see I have to post more carefully.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sat 4 Jun, 2011 08:49 pm
@Ionus,
That figures.
0 Replies
 
 

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