4
   

Are the words in bold correctly used?

 
 
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Thu 12 May, 2011 02:09 pm
@JTT,
Sorry I was posting without anything in front of me, and just trying to remember the gist of what you said. I don't want to misquote you. You did give a lot of examples that you thought were equally appropriate. That's what I was going on. Looking at the sentence itself I would suggest that as it sounds fine to me, but that you would choose to say things differently, that the source would be more likely to be from this side of the pond.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  2  
Reply Thu 12 May, 2011 04:44 pm
@tanguatlay,
True, and Contrex's take works.
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  0  
Reply Thu 12 May, 2011 04:56 pm
@contrex,
Quote:
Personally, I feel the verbs are inconsistent too.


But now you know better.
0 Replies
 
FBM
 
  2  
Reply Thu 12 May, 2011 06:54 pm
@tanguatlay,
tanguatlay wrote:

Hi JTT

If I were in his place and someone did that to me, I would have used even worse words to call him. I can imagine the pressure and tension Anwar has to go through.

As I said in my first post of this thread, I think the verbs are inconsistent.

If I were in his place and someone did that to me, I would use even worse words to call him. I would write 'would use' for the second part of the sentence instead of 'would have used'.


I think you're right. It looks like a verb tense shift complicated by the use of the subjunctive. This looks more consistent to me:
"If I had been in his place and someone had done that to me, I would have used even worse words to call him."
JTT
 
  0  
Reply Thu 12 May, 2011 07:36 pm
@FBM,
Quote:
Yeah, they're correct. It's all in the subjunctive mood, and verbs inflect in several ways in the various forms of the subjunctive.


Quote:
I think you're right. It looks like a verb tense shift complicated by the use of the subjunctive.


Here's a shining example of the Longman Grammar of Spoken and Written English's caveat that native speakers are notoriously poor judges of how their language works.
0 Replies
 
tanguatlay
 
  1  
Reply Thu 12 May, 2011 08:22 pm
@JTT,
JTT wrote:

Hello to you, Ms Tan.
My gut feeling, with nothing else to back me up, is that if the focus is clearly on a past event, the greater tendency would be to use,
'had been - would have

Hello, JTT.

I would also use the above structure. That's why I said the sentence I posted contains inconsistency in the use of the verbs.







JTT
 
  1  
Reply Thu 12 May, 2011 08:28 pm
@tanguatlay,
Quote:
I would also use the above structure. That's why I said the sentence I posted contains inconsistency in the use of the verbs.


The "greater tendency" doesn't preclude all other choices, Ms Tan.
0 Replies
 
MontereyJack
 
  1  
Reply Thu 12 May, 2011 08:44 pm
I think the original is fine. However I do think you're not using jury correctly. "The jury is out" while they are deciding their verdict, while they are deliberating (they've gone to another room than the courtroom to do that)/ "The jury is in" when they've reached a verdict and come back to the courtroom to deliver it. So you wanted to ask if the jury was still out, not if it wasn't out.
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Thu 12 May, 2011 09:35 pm
@MontereyJack,
Quote:
However I do think you're not using jury correctly.



Ms Tan noted her mistake in Post: # 4,605,346 on page 1, MJ.
tanguatlay
 
  1  
Reply Thu 12 May, 2011 10:38 pm
@JTT,
JTT wrote:

Quote:
However I do think you're not using jury correctly.

Ms Tan noted her mistake in Post: # 4,605,346 on page 1, MJ.
You are indeed alert, JTT.
0 Replies
 
 

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