6
   

NPR CEO Finally Dumped

 
 
Reply Wed 9 Mar, 2011 01:00 pm
Quote:
11:40 a.m. | Updated | NPR said Wednesday that the public radio organization’s board had accepted the resignation of its chief executive, Vivian Schiller.



Her resignation comes at a precarious time for public broadcasting, as Republicans in Congress are trying to strip NPR and its member stations of tens of millions of dollars in federal funds. NPR has been consumed by controversy as of late; most recently, a Republican filmmaker released a video on Tuesday that showed one of NPR’s fund-raising executives repeatedly criticizing Republicans and Tea Party supporters in a conversation with people posing as prospective donors.

That incident, as well as an earlier one involving Juan Williams, who was dismissed by NPR last fall, “became such a distraction to the organization it hindered Vivian Schiller’s ability to lead the organization going forward,” Dave Edwards, the chairman of NPR’s board of directors, said Wednesday.
http://mediadecoder.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/03/09/chief-executive-of-npr-resigns/?hp

This has not been a good week for women trying to do leadership positions. Julie Taymor and Vivian Schiller get dumped, and Tina Brown gets slammed for doing inferior work....
 
PUNKEY
 
  2  
Reply Wed 9 Mar, 2011 01:09 pm
What did SHE get dumped for?

Can't keep her little boys in line?

The woman always gets blamed. . .
hawkeye10
 
  0  
Reply Wed 9 Mar, 2011 01:12 pm
@PUNKEY,
Quote:
Can't keep her little boys in line?
in other words, for poor leadership skills......There has been nearly constant drama at NPR ever since she took over, which has not been good for NPR. Before Williams there was a lot of flak for how she conducted cost cutting and for who she was putting into leadership roles and how she was organizing management and for the decreasing representation of minorities on staff. She was arguing that making NPR better meant doing unpopular things, but at this point the board obviously feels that she is part of the problem, not the solution.
Ragman
 
  3  
Reply Wed 9 Mar, 2011 01:17 pm
@hawkeye10,
Keep 'em in the kitchen, barefoot and pregnant, eh, Hawk?

How about focusing some attention on the hundreds of male Wall Street CEOs (like at Goldman Sachs) that have contributed negatively and helped put our economy and our retirements in the shitter.
hawkeye10
 
  -1  
Reply Wed 9 Mar, 2011 01:23 pm
@Ragman,
Quote:
Keep 'em in the kitchen, barefoot and pregnant, eh, Hawk?
IDK if there is a problem, but I do know that we have seen enough failure of women to perform in leadership roles that we can not take at face value the assertion that what is considered their underrepresentation in leadership roles is discrimination. It might be that not that many women are good at this, so that promotion on merit means that we are not going to end up with many women in leadership roles.

This issue needs further study. I am not taking a position yet.
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Wed 9 Mar, 2011 01:24 pm
@Ragman,
Let's talk about Charlie Sheen!

Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 9 Mar, 2011 01:26 pm
@chai2,
Let's talk about Sex, babee...
0 Replies
 
hawkeye10
 
  0  
Reply Wed 9 Mar, 2011 01:27 pm
@chai2,
Quote:
Let's talk about Charlie Sheen!
Not relevant, he is an artist, not a leader.
Ragman
 
  3  
Reply Wed 9 Mar, 2011 01:29 pm
@hawkeye10,
but you seem to HAVE taken a position with your negative fous on the problem cases.

Take an example of Carly Fiorina...former CEO of HP and in Representative of CA? You would love her (conservative Repug).
djjd62
 
  2  
Reply Wed 9 Mar, 2011 01:32 pm
@Ragman,
but don't you know, the strong women are keeping the men down Rolling Eyes
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 9 Mar, 2011 01:34 pm
@djjd62,
...yes..with any luck!
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Wed 9 Mar, 2011 01:34 pm
@Ragman,
Quote:
What about Carly Fiorina...former CEO of HP and in Representative of CA?
Another poor performance by a female in a leadership position. Mike Hurd was called in to fix HP.
engineer
 
  2  
Reply Wed 9 Mar, 2011 01:39 pm
@hawkeye10,
Maybe the issue is that friendly boards are more likely to fire women who do not fit into the boys' club than men with strong ties to the board members. Fortune made the case that far too few CEO's get the boot and when they do, they are overly compensated. The Huffington Post made a pretty decent argument that nine big name CEO's should be fired for cause. Eight were white, nine were male. A woman who gets the to top spot likely gets there more on merit than on who she knows and once there has more to prove and less personal good will on the board. The pay is pretty good though.
djjd62
 
  1  
Reply Wed 9 Mar, 2011 01:39 pm
@Ragman,
Cool
0 Replies
 
Ragman
 
  2  
Reply Wed 9 Mar, 2011 01:42 pm
@hawkeye10,
So you want to blame her being CEO for all the problems in that company and the industry's volatility and losses in the market. Are you going to suggest there WASN'T an atmosphere of 'Good-old-Boy's club' that helped make it impossible for her to succeed as she wasn't one of them?

Pretty simplistic viewpoint. I've worked in the electronics and computer industry for most of my adult life. The success and/or failure of a comapny is unduly credited or blamed on a CEO. There are several mitigating factors that make up the dynamics of the downturn of that segment of computer industry in the 90s and '00s.

You would increase your credibility immensely if you could find a positive example of a corporate officer. I suggested one...and who, BTW, was elected by the wise CA electorate who elected Ahnuld, the Governator. They know winners, right?
0 Replies
 
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Wed 9 Mar, 2011 01:42 pm
@engineer,
Quote:
Maybe the issue is that friendly boards are more likely to fire women who do not fit into the boys' club than men with strong ties to the board members
Maybe, I dont claim to know. What I do know is that we seem to be seeing a rate of failure of women in leadership positions that is higher than for men. Seeing that, I want to know what is going on.
Ragman
 
  2  
Reply Wed 9 Mar, 2011 01:47 pm
@hawkeye10,
Your phrase 'what is going' on implies you are curious. This is good if it is sincere.Women CEOs seem to have a different set of dynamics then male CEOs. Good Old Boy networks are a hard barrier to break through.
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Wed 9 Mar, 2011 01:57 pm
@Ragman,
Quote:
Good Old Boy networks are a hard barrier to break through.
I dont believe that.....I have seen way too many women power networks that work just as well or better than the good old boy networks. Science has proven that women are very good at networking as well.

I am inclined to believe that if women do have a problem it is due to their skillsets, not institutional bias against them.
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 9 Mar, 2011 02:36 pm
@hawkeye10,
I respectfully disagree. Especially seeing that institutional bias has to be acknowledged, lest one be considered as a disingenuous debater. And, this bias cannot be taken out of the equation as it's been far too well documented throughout industries (e.g. the earth is NOT flat).

However, rather than continue debating, I'll suggest further research on your part as you expressed your curiosity. My experience and conclusions differ from your's. Perhaps others on A2K who have researched female CEO success stories can put in their 2 cents.

Incidentally, Carly Fiorina has far more successes than the ones I listed, if you look her up on Google or Wiki. I only listed one or 2, though, IMHO, it's quite an accomplishment getting elected to the House, I feel. These accomplishments seem not be enough for Mr. Hawkeye.
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Wed 9 Mar, 2011 02:49 pm
@hawkeye10,
What does your wife think about that viewpoint?

Have you explained to your daughters that it is their innate skill set that is inadequate?
 

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