6
   

NPR CEO Finally Dumped

 
 
chai2
 
  2  
Reply Wed 9 Mar, 2011 03:08 pm
@hawkeye10,
hawkeye10 wrote:

Quote:
Let's talk about Charlie Sheen!
Not relevant, he is an artist, not a leader.


I meant that talking about Charlie Sheen has about as much relationship to the CEO of NPR getting dumped as the fact she's a female.

Let's talk about all the male CEO's that have been **** canned!

Then, we can talk about Charlie!

0 Replies
 
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Wed 9 Mar, 2011 03:11 pm
@ehBeth,
The women in my life don't agree with me, they think women must work twice as had and be better than the men to be considered equal on the job.

We have raised our kids to think for themselves.....they don't necisarily care what I think. We have also tried to teach that people have the right to there own mind, and that disagreeing with people does not have to mean that you can't work with them or be friends with them.
chai2
 
  2  
Reply Wed 9 Mar, 2011 03:28 pm
@hawkeye10,
hawkeye10 wrote:

The women in my life don't agree with me, they think women must work twice as had and be better than the men to be considered equal on the job.



I'd like to know who came up with that crock of **** idea.

Someonewhere, someone said that silly phrase, and it's just become gospel to some people.

If the women in your life think that, they certainly don't think for themselves.

I have the idea that perhaps that "have to work twice as hard and be better to be considered equal" sprung from the mind of some one whose idea was to scare women off from even trying.

Shame that it works.

Since you're always pulling statistics out, how about quantitatively showing where one gender must work 2X's as hard to be considered just as good.

No anecdotive examples, give the fact's jack.

Irishk
 
  2  
Reply Wed 9 Mar, 2011 03:43 pm
She wasn't dumped, she resigned.
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Wed 9 Mar, 2011 03:57 pm
@Irishk,
Well, there ya go.

Next case.
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 9 Mar, 2011 04:23 pm
@chai2,
People in CEO positions who resign sometimes do so for reasons that aren't always transparent to the outside. If the Good Old Boys aren't cooperative and help solve the problems by pitching in along side her/him because of their bias, then they can cause them to be hung out to dry. So some CEOs resign so as to avoid the appearance of being fired. In reality, they can be forced out. The Board meets and suggests to CEO that they resign. One possible scenario.
hawkeye10
 
  0  
Reply Wed 9 Mar, 2011 05:42 pm
@chai2,
Quote:
Since you're always pulling statistics out, how about quantitatively showing where one gender must work 2X's as hard to be considered just as good
Let me see if I have this straight......you want me to find statistics to document as fact somebody else's opinion, an opinion that I don't share?

I'll take a pass, tyvm.
engineer
 
  1  
Reply Wed 9 Mar, 2011 05:45 pm
Interesting story on Marketplace tonight. It said the board of NPR is made up of reps from member stations, people who are very dependent on government dollars. NPR itself is self sufficient and has been expanding news coverage and investigative reporting as they develop other distribution channels but local stations need government dollars and are not nearly so sanguine about government support. My local station reports around 20% of their budget comes from the federal government.
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 9 Mar, 2011 05:51 pm
@engineer,
...and so.... connect the dots here, please? how did this get this woman fired?
engineer
 
  3  
Reply Wed 9 Mar, 2011 05:54 pm
@Ragman,
The "expert" they were interviewing was making the point that the member stations are very afraid of offending politicians who control the purse-strings and are very willing to sacrifice someone as a peace offering. He also made the point that it won't work. Those who do not support public broadcasting will not do so just because they install a CEO who will beg.
hawkeye10
 
  -1  
Reply Wed 9 Mar, 2011 05:59 pm
@Ragman,
Quote:
If the Good Old Boys aren't cooperative and help solve the problems by pitching in along side her/him because of their bias, then they can cause them to be hung out to dry
the way I count 6 of 17 NPR board members were women at voting time. Nationally 12% of boards are women. That is not a lot, but it is enough to keep the good old boys from running roughshod over women. You seem to be way behind the times....and way of base suggesting that this might have happened at NPR. You are showing a bias against men.
hawkeye10
 
  0  
Reply Wed 9 Mar, 2011 06:02 pm
@engineer,
Quote:
The Board of Directors of NPR is responsible for the governance of our 501(c)3 nonprofit corporation. The board sets the policies and overall direction for NPR management, monitors NPR's performance, and provides financial oversight. The board consists of seventeen directors, ten of whom are managers of NPR member stations and are elected to the board by their fellow member stations. The seven remaining directors include the president of NPR, the chairman of the NPR Foundation, and five prominent members of the public selected by the board and confirmed by NPR member stations.

LIST OF BOARD MEMBERS
.
.
http://www.npr.org/about/aboutnpr/people/board.html
0 Replies
 
Ragman
 
  3  
Reply Wed 9 Mar, 2011 06:15 pm
@hawkeye10,
hmmm?. Now being that I'm a doubting thomas ... without you stating a single source for those 'facts' you list, why should I believe any of those stats you posted? Are you saying that 12% of board members being women can "stop Boards from running roughshod over women"? How does 12% represent an effective majority or a power base that can't be worked around?


You really think I have a bias against my own gender? That's pretty interesting tactic as you try to impugn my word just because I disagree with you? Interesting tactic, but faulty thinking. How is that I'm way behind the times when I restate what many in industry have been seeing happen for decades?

I reiterate that I see no backup of any proof from you that women have not the requisite skills at managing at CEO level. It's purely your opinion...and with nothing factual to back it up. It appears to me that it's you that's way behind the times.
chai2
 
  3  
Reply Wed 9 Mar, 2011 07:09 pm
@hawkeye10,
hawkeye10 wrote:

Quote:
Since you're always pulling statistics out, how about quantitatively showing where one gender must work 2X's as hard to be considered just as good
Let me see if I have this straight......you want me to find statistics to document as fact somebody else's opinion, an opinion that I don't share?

I'll take a pass, tyvm.


Sure, it should be so hard for you to support opinions that aren't your own.
You obviously started this thread to, as usual, stir up a stink. It's what you do. It's all you ever do. You're so damn predictible.

I can even predict what your response will be.

hawkeye10
 
  -1  
Reply Wed 9 Mar, 2011 07:52 pm
@chai2,
Quote:
You're so damn predictible.
That is a good thing in my books, as I find those who are unpredictible to be not very good company. That are also almost impossible to work with.
0 Replies
 
hawkeye10
 
  0  
Reply Thu 10 Mar, 2011 09:16 pm
Quote:
At another point, Kasaam asked Liley, "It sounded like you're saying that NPR would be able to shield us from a government audit, is that correct?"



"I think that is the case, especially if you were anonymous, and I can inquire about that," Liley said. She later informed Kasaam via e-mail that NPR's management had cleared an anonymous donation from his group.

NPR had previously said, in the wake of the luncheon video, that it had "repeatedly refused" to accept donations from the organization.

NPR put Liley on administrative leave as a result of the video.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2011/03/10/AR2011031005119.html?hpid=topnews

Yawza, if this was payback for the mistreatment of Williams I think we can say that the scales of justice are now even.
0 Replies
 
firefly
 
  1  
Reply Fri 11 Mar, 2011 12:08 am
@Ragman,
Perhaps Hawkeye should consider the track record of Meg Whitman.
Quote:
Meg Whitman

Margaret Cushing "Meg" Whitman (born August 4, 1956) is an American businesswoman. A native of Long Island, New York, she is a graduate of Princeton University and Harvard Business School. Whitman served as an executive in The Walt Disney Company where she was vice president of strategic planning throughout the 1980s. In the 1990s, she served as an executive for DreamWorks, Procter & Gamble, and Hasbro. Whitman served as President and Chief Executive Officer of eBay from 1998 to 2008. During her ten years with the company she oversaw expansion from 30 employees and $4 million in annual revenue to more than 15,000 employees and $8 billion in annual revenue when she stepped down.

She was inducted into the U.S. Business Hall of Fame in 2008.

Whitman has received numerous awards and accolades for her work at eBay. On more than one occasion, she was named among the Top Five most powerful women by Fortune Magazine. Harvard Business Review has named her the eighth-best-performing CEO of the past decade as well as having the Financial Times name her as one of the 50 faces that shaped the decade.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meg_Whitman


And there is Angela Braly (CEO of WellPoint)
Quote:
Angela F. Braly (born July 1, 1961 in Dallas, Texas) is president and chief executive officer for WellPoint, Inc., a large US-based health care company, and is a member of the company's board of directors. She assumed those responsibilities on June 1, 2007, following several high-profile roles for the company.

Forbes listed Braly as the sixteenth most powerful woman in the world in 2007,fourth most powerful in 2008, and eighth most powerful in 2009. Fortune ranked Braly the fourth most powerful woman in business in America in 2007, fifth most powerful in 2008., and fourth most powerful in 2009.

As of April 2009, Braly had the 306th highest compensation for a US CEO, having earned $4.07 million, which is 74th among females. She owns $4.6 million worth of WellPoint stock, or .02% of the company.In 2007, Braly earned $14.86 million, mostly in stock options. Total compensation was $8.7 million in 2008 and $13.1 million in 2009
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Angela_Braly

And Ellen Kullman (CEO DuPont}
Quote:
Ellen J. Kullman (born January 1956, Wilmington, Delaware) is an American business executive. She is President, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Company ("DuPont") in Wilmington and a former director of General Motors. Forbes ranked her 7th of the 100 Most Powerful Women in 2009.

DuPont's board of directors elected Kullman President and a director of the company with effect from October 1, 2008 and Chief Executive Officer with effect from January 1, 2009. She is the nineteenth executive, and the first woman, to lead the company in its 206 year history.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ellen_J._Kullman

And Pat Woertz (CEO Archer Daniels Midland)
Quote:
Patricia Ann Woertz became CEO of Archer Daniels Midland in 2006, beating out 4 other competitors. Formerly an Executive Vice President at Chevron Corporation, Woertz left to pursue CEO opportunities. In an interview with Fortune Magazine, she characterized herself as an outsider at ADM: "I'm outside the company, outside the industry, outside the family, outside the gender expectations."

As CEO of ADM, in 2010, Woertz was ranked the 3rd most powerful women by Fortune magazine. In 2009, with a rank of 93, Woertz was the top-ranking woman on the Fortune 500's list of top CEOs. Also in 2009, Forbes ranked Woertz as the 26th most powerful woman in the world.

While CEO of Archer Daniels Midland in 2009, Patricia A. Woertz earned a total compensation of $14,689,022, which included a base salary of $1,300,000, a cash bonus of $2,040,384, stocks granted of $4,919,563, options granted of $6,356,267, and other compensation totaling $72,807
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patricia_A._Woertz


It seems to me that women certainly have the requisite skills to function quite well at the CEO level. Hawkeye has problems acknowledging that woman can, and do, make effective leaders--at the highest levels.

hawkeye10
 
  0  
Reply Fri 11 Mar, 2011 01:32 am
@firefly,
Quote:
It seems to me that women certainly have the requisite skills to function quite well at the CEO level. Hawkeye has problems acknowledging that woman can, and do, make effective leaders--at the highest levels.
Oh Please......saying that the failure rate of women seems to be higher than men is not saying that there are not women who can and do do the the job well, as you well know. There might not even be a high failure rate of women, and if there is might or not be the womans fault, as Engineer has pointed out.
firefly
 
  2  
Reply Fri 11 Mar, 2011 02:16 am
@hawkeye10,
Quote:
Oh Please......saying that the failure rate of women seems to be higher than men is not saying that there are not women who can and do do the the job well, as you well know. There might not even be a high failure rate of women, and if there is might or not be the womans fault, as Engineer has pointed out.

You just managed to contradict yourself in the short span of a single paragraph.

You are the one who previously asserted
Quote:
What I do know is that we seem to be seeing a rate of failure of women in leadership positions that is higher than for men.


And you also denied that problems with bias, or the good old boys network, might affect or hinder a woman's advancement or successful performance.
Quote:
IDK if there is a problem, but I do know that we have seen enough failure of women to perform in leadership roles that we can not take at face value the assertion that what is considered their underrepresentation in leadership roles is discrimination.


I'm glad that you now seem to be admitting that your previous statements regarding a higher failure rate for women in leadership roles had no basis in fact. You are admitting that, aren't you?

I'm also glad that you are acknowledging points, raised by both ragman and engineer, that other factors, beyond the woman's personal abilities, may operate and influence how successful she is in reaching a CEO level, and how effectively she can function in the position once she attains it. It really is nice to know that sometimes you do pause long enough to consider what others have to say, and that you are receptive enough to let it alter your thinking, even if only slightly.
hawkeye10
 
  0  
Reply Fri 11 Mar, 2011 02:43 am
@firefly,
Quote:
You just managed to contradict yourself in the short span of a single paragraph
You are not that dumb that you believe your own words, because you know that "seems to be" is not "is"....it might be or it might not be.
Quote:

And you also denied that problems with bias, or the good old boys network, might affect or hinder a woman's advancement or successful performance
I said that I dont think that bias accounts for what appears to be the poor performance of women once they finally do get leadership roles. It is there, it is probably a factor, but I think that there is clearly something else going on. We of the educated set have been kinda talking around the edges of this situation for a long time, but we never get down to any clarity on why women are not in leadership roles to the degree we see in other parts of the world, and why we seem to see so many spectacular flame outs of women when they do get into the plum positions. I dont know what the problem is, or even if there is a problem, but I do think that we need to extinguish the PC laws long enough to have some straight talk, long enough to get to the bottom of this.
 

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