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The impending Government Shutdown

 
 
Butrflynet
 
  2  
Reply Thu 24 Feb, 2011 05:40 pm
@Cycloptichorn,
I don't think it was hyperbolic at all. It was an alert to seniors, military families, medical service providers and others who will be in dire straights without advanced warning of a possible shutdown. With the warning they can prepare by curtailing expenditures and holding back on some of their non-essential bill payments to help them survive the battle.
hawkeye10
 
  2  
Reply Thu 24 Feb, 2011 05:54 pm
@Butrflynet,
Quote:
It was an alert to seniors, military families, medical service providers and others who will be in dire straights without advanced warning of a possible shutdown
Considering that the SS and military pay checks would be not effected it was dishonest fear up approach. Medical service checks already routinely are months late so that is not a big deal, the medical system could handle it.
0 Replies
 
djjd62
 
  2  
Reply Thu 24 Feb, 2011 06:08 pm
id much rather there was an impending government showdown, sort of like thunderdome, build a big steel cage, fill it full of weapons (no firearms, hand to hand combat only, knives, swords, axes, spears etc), throw all the politicians in and have them fight to the death, last man standing gets to set policy
0 Replies
 
engineer
 
  1  
Reply Thu 24 Feb, 2011 07:29 pm
@hawkeye10,
hawkeye10 wrote:

The bankers are the Chinese, Japanese, Brits et all....who look upon failures of the American political system as threats to their investment. At the moment rates are moving down because of Mid East instability, but American political leaders should take no comfort in that. The 90's shut down happened with the world believing in America and with a generally sound economy. We got away with it last time, but we are unlikely to repeat that free pass for failure now.

I do not think any foreign governments will be able to sway the Republican House at all. They could dump all their dollars on the market making our currency worthless the the House would not change their position one bit. The Democrats are maybe one step better, but probably not. No foreign governments will play a role in the upcoming fiasco regardless of their substantial stake in the matter.
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Thu 24 Feb, 2011 07:36 pm
@engineer,
Quote:
I do not think any foreign governments will be able to sway the Republican House at all.
From taking a bite out of government true, but recent statements from the GOP show that they heard the demand from the bankers loud a clear. They say that they have zero desire to shut down the government, that all they require is that the continuing resolution to fund the government during negotiations takes a haircut. The Dems will go along, as they are not going to shut down government over a temporary few percentage point shrinkage of the government. Plus they historically are spineless.
0 Replies
 
Cycloptichorn
 
  2  
Reply Fri 25 Feb, 2011 11:08 am
Quote:
WITH ONE WEEK TO GO BEFORE THE SHUTDOWN DEADLINE.... Policymakers in Washington have exactly one week to steer clear of the government-shutdown iceberg, and as of yesterday, some of the relevant players weren't even trying to work on this.

Not only are the halls of Congress empty, but House Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio) spent the day playing golf in Florida. (In 1995, as a government shutdown loomed, Boehner blasted then-President Bill Clinton for playing a round while Congress continued its work. "Now is the time, not to play golf as the president did yesterday, now is the time to act," Boehner said at the time.)

In the upper chamber, though, Senate Democrats were tackling a new proposal to keep the lights on. For much of the week, the discussion has centered on how to shape a temporary extension that would give lawmakers time for additional negotiations. That's proved far more difficult than it should -- for Democrats, the line is, "Let's give ourselves more time to discuss budget cuts." For Republicans, the line is, "Give us budget cuts first, and then we'll discuss budget cuts."

So, yesterday, the Senate majority began work on a new tack.

With a political standoff over spending threatening to trigger a federal shutdown next week, Senate Democrats began drafting a plan Thursday to slice billions of dollars from domestic agency budgets over the next seven months, yielding to Republican demands to reduce the size of government this year.

The plan will involve accelerating some of the $33 billion in program terminations and reductions included in President Obama's proposed budget for next year, a senior Senate Democratic aide said Thursday. Democrats are also looking at cuts that have been adopted by the Republican-controlled House, such as a plan to strip $8.5 billion for pet projects known as earmarks out of a measure aimed at keeping the government running through Sept. 30.

"This would be a compromise," the aide said, "accepting something that they've already asked for."

This approach appears intended to simply wrap up the work for the rest of the fiscal year, bypassing the need for a temporary extension. To accommodate Republican demands, Senate Democrats would include extensive budget cuts, effectively taking cuts the White House proposed for next year's budget, and incorporating them into the remainder of this year's.

It's unclear exactly how deep these cuts would be -- they won't be $61 billion -- and House Republicans have not said whether they'd consider such a plan.

The strategy is not without risk. Democrats continue to move closer to the Republican position, in the hopes of appearing reasonable and open to compromise. This, in turn, would make the GOP even more responsible for a shutdown, should it occur next week. At the same time, if House Republican leaders see Dems already making concessions -- something the GOP has refused to do -- it wouldn't be surprising if Boehner & Co. continued to hold out and see how much further Democrats would be willing to go.


Once again, the inflexible deadline hasn't changed, and time is running short. Yesterday, I said there's an 85% chance of a shutdown. As of this morning, I'd put it at 87%.
—Steve Benen 8:00 AM Permalink | Trackbacks | Comments (25)


http://www.washingtonmonthly.com/archives/individual/2011_02/028165.php

Cycloptichorn
failures art
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 Feb, 2011 11:24 am
@wandeljw,
wandeljw - I'm not a gov employee. I'm a contractor still. That said, it wouldn't make a difference. On my site, the government employees will have to show up for work even if the government shuts down. That's how things go in defense. Same goes for my roommate. He works for the NRC. He'll have to work and won't get paid. Furlow isn't a option for some jobs. Republican or Democrat, this will raise hell in Washington.

I'd say about a quarter of my friends here are Federal employees. Most of them are pretty much watching the minute hand waiting for this to happen.

A
R
T
Cycloptichorn
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 Feb, 2011 11:26 am
@failures art,
failures art wrote:

wandeljw - I'm not a gov employee. I'm a contractor still. That said, it wouldn't make a difference. On my site, the government employees will have to show up for work even if the government shuts down. That's how things go in defense. Same goes for my roommate. He works for the NRC. He'll have to work and won't get paid. Furlow isn't a option for some jobs. Republican or Democrat, this will raise hell in Washington.

I'd say about a quarter of my friends here are Federal employees. Most of them are pretty much watching the minute hand waiting for this to happen.

A
R
T


Do you have any idea how this thing is going to play with the in-crowd?

It seems pretty clear to me that from an optics point of view, the new group came in and is 'forcing' the shutdown. But I'm not sure how other people see it.

Cycloptichorn
failures art
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 Feb, 2011 11:31 am
@Cycloptichorn,
I think it will strain all people. I remember the mood around town after Obama proposed the pay raise freeze for feds. The mood was dim. I imagine this will create a lot of friction with the "in-crowd."

A
R
T
0 Replies
 
failures art
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 Feb, 2011 11:41 am
@Cycloptichorn,
If John Boehner is golfing, this means he's outdoors. The spray on tan industry is about to crash. SELL SELL SELL!

A
R
T
0 Replies
 
Irishk
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 Feb, 2011 11:44 am
The post office will still be up and running. They say they're 'self-funding'.

Stop laughing!
Cycloptichorn
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 Feb, 2011 11:45 am
@Irishk,
Irishk wrote:

The post office will still be up and running. They say they're 'self-funding'.

Stop laughing!


Well, they ARE, compared to many other government businesses. They have citizens coming in and handing them money all day. They can't maintain operations for long based solely on the incoming cash flow, but they won't be dead in the water.

Cycloptichorn
Irishk
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 Feb, 2011 12:00 pm
@Cycloptichorn,
The Republican insiders think a shutdown will be a disaster (for them). They remember the last one.

http://hotlineoncall.nationaljournal.com/archives/2011/02/gop-insiders-du.php

Cycloptichorn
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 Feb, 2011 12:01 pm
@Irishk,
Irishk wrote:

The Republican insiders think a shutdown will be a disaster (for them). They remember the last one.

http://hotlineoncall.nationaljournal.com/archives/2011/02/gop-insiders-du.php




This mirrors what I've been reading all week on this issue. However, the base is RABIDLY in favor of a shutdown and seems to believe - probably based on last years' elections - that the majority of the country supports them in this.

I actually feel bad for Boehner, dishonest bastard that he is; he's in one of the worst political jams I've ever seen.

Cycloptichorn
Irishk
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 Feb, 2011 12:03 pm
@Cycloptichorn,
I think Intrade has the chance of a shutdown at 35% or so.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 Feb, 2011 12:06 pm
@Irishk,
What's MoW?
Irishk
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 Feb, 2011 12:08 pm
@ossobuco,
Meals on Wheels
JPB
 
  3  
Reply Fri 25 Feb, 2011 12:16 pm
Let's play the Blame Game.

Quote:
WASHINGTON — House Republicans on Friday urged Senate Democrats to accept $4 billion in cuts as a compromise to keep the government running for two weeks past a March 4 deadline.

"A government shutdown is not an acceptable or responsible option for Republicans," House Majority Leader Eric Cantor of Virginia said in a conference call where he and other Republicans promoted their plan for avoiding the first government shutdown since 1996.

They said failure to work out a deal would put the responsibility for a disruption of government services on the Democrats.
Story: Sources: Senate Dems consider spending cuts

With only a week left before federal spending authority runs out, both parties have sought to preemptively blame the other if a shutdown does occur. Democrats who control the Senate have rejected as draconian a bill passed by the House last week that would fund the government through the end of the fiscal year on Sept. 30 while carrying out $61 billion in spending cuts.
The cost of keeping the government's lights off

They have called for a short-term extension of federal spending so the parties can negotiate, but at current spending levels.

'Common sense cuts'
Cantor said the $4 billion they want to trim from the current budget over a two-week period would come from eliminating some of the earmarks or special projects already in the budget and accelerating spending cuts that President Barack Obama has proposed for fiscal year 2012 starting in October.

If Senate Democrats walk away from that offer, said Illinois Republican Peter Roskam, "they are then actively engineering a government shutdown." More
Cycloptichorn
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 Feb, 2011 12:22 pm
@JPB,
The problem is that the '2-week extension' bill that the Republicans are pimping ISN'T a compromise. It's their original bill shortened to a 2-week period instead of a 52-week one. It's the exact same thing they've been pushing all along, just in a shorter time frame. And if the Dems agree to it, Republicans will use that agreement like a hammer in future negotiations - "You've already agreed to it for 2 weeks, why not the other 50?'

The transparent lies they are telling are depressing and stunning all at the same time. It's sad, because the vast majority are too uninformed or stupid to realize just how often these guys lie about fiscal matters.

The Dems are right to call their bluff on this one. I haven't seen much evidence that this will in fact benefit the Republicans in any way.

Cycloptichorn
0 Replies
 
wandeljw
 
  3  
Reply Fri 25 Feb, 2011 12:25 pm
@failures art,
failures art wrote:

wandeljw - I'm not a gov employee. I'm a contractor still. That said, it wouldn't make a difference. On my site, the government employees will have to show up for work even if the government shuts down. That's how things go in defense. Same goes for my roommate. He works for the NRC. He'll have to work and won't get paid. Furlow isn't a option for some jobs. Republican or Democrat, this will raise hell in Washington.

I'd say about a quarter of my friends here are Federal employees. Most of them are pretty much watching the minute hand waiting for this to happen.

A
R
T


I am glad some will still work if there is a shutdown. Actually, in 1996, no more than two-thirds of federal employees were furloughed.

I will report on A2K if I get furloughed again.

There were some jokes about the space shuttle not being able to return if there is a shutdown.
0 Replies
 
 

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