3
   

The Unmitigated Disaster that is the Spiderman musical.

 
 
Reply Mon 7 Feb, 2011 09:42 pm
Cursed by countless cast injuries, Spiderman: Turn Off the Dark is struggling to get out of its preview stage and into a regular Broadway schedule.

Quote:
Directed by Julie Taymor, who wrote the show’s book with Glen Berger, and featuring songs by U2’s Bono and the Edge, “Spider-Man” is not only the most expensive musical ever to hit Broadway; it may also rank among the worst.

http://theater.nytimes.com/2011/02/08/theater/reviews/spiderman-review.html?hp

Does anyone of you feel compelled to see this $65 million dollar train wreck? To see the schadenfreude driven accidents that befall the cast? Or do you really unconditionally love Bono and the Edge that you'll shell beaucoup bucks for whatever they create in the world of music?
  • Topic Stats
  • Top Replies
  • Link to this Topic
Type: Discussion • Score: 3 • Views: 2,407 • Replies: 20
No top replies

 
Rockhead
 
  1  
Reply Mon 7 Feb, 2011 09:47 pm
@tsarstepan,
I'd go to see the live stunts.

the list is impressive...
Ceili
 
  1  
Reply Mon 7 Feb, 2011 09:47 pm
I might have considered it, however it's a bit of a commute.
0 Replies
 
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Mon 7 Feb, 2011 09:50 pm
@Rockhead,
Plus the chance to get an actual actor to fall in your lap (literally) might give the show an extra thrill. Shocked
0 Replies
 
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Mon 7 Feb, 2011 10:03 pm
@tsarstepan,
I am glad that the reviewers and their employers are not going to give this show anymore time to play fast and lose with standard courtesy. I think the decider was when several weeks back a bunch of producers publicly flogged the producers of this show for holding so many performances before opening. We might have in Spiderman another show that closes immediately following opening night.

Quote:
Broadway Shows That Close On Opening Night
The classic example of the Big Broadway Flop is the show that closes on opening night. How can this even happen? Well, it usually starts with really bad buzz during previews. If it looks like the Broadway show is not going to get any better during the previews period, and the word-of-mouth continues to be terrible, the show's producers may start (secretly) considering the possibility of closing the show if the reviews aren't positive. The show has its Broadway opening night, later that night the reviews are abysmal, and the producers come to the conclusion that the combination of bad buzz and bad reviews is going to equal low ticket sales. Knowing that they're destined to lose money with every ensuing performance, they go ahead and announce the day after opening that the previous night's performance was the show's last. Hence, the show closed on opening night. This fate doesn't befall many Broadway shows - it only seems to happen once every several years. Recent Broadway flop shows that closed on opening night include Moose Murders in 1983, The Oldest Living Conferederate Widow Tells All in 2003, and Glory Days in '08.
http://www.nytix.com/Links/Broadway/Articles/broadwayflops.html
0 Replies
 
PUNKEY
 
  1  
Reply Tue 8 Feb, 2011 07:51 am
It seems techinical problems were the big issue. With all the Cirque de XXX around, why not consult with their choreographers and stage managers? They do amazing things on stage.

I was really looking forward to that coming ot our area. I would have paid for all my grandkids to go - me too!

I wonder what REALLY happened. Follow the money trail.
Someone wanted this to bomb.
djjd62
 
  1  
Reply Tue 8 Feb, 2011 08:02 am
i can't for the life of me figure out who the audience is/was for this thing

it seemed (to me anyway) like a bad idea from the start
0 Replies
 
sozobe
 
  1  
Reply Tue 8 Feb, 2011 08:13 am
@PUNKEY,
I just read the review (in the paper, just happened to come back to the computer and see this) -- it sounds like it's just plain bad. Bad songs, bad story, bad sets, bad action sequences, bad everything.

I think Julie Taymor is to blame here. She did a great job with the Lion King and she has a lot of talent but this doesn't seem to have come together. She might be one of those artists who needs some discipline imposed from the outside in order to do a good job, and she was given a lot of freedom here.
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Tue 8 Feb, 2011 12:16 pm
@sozobe,
Quote:
I think Julie Taymor is to blame here
having your director be the head writer seems like a bad idea, specially when before this her claim to fame have been her visuals and not her story telling skill, but there are lots of other problems....like having a committee of producers where no one person can make a decision seems like a bigger problem, and would primarily account for the creation of mush. Bono is another problem, as he thinks he can do everything and it normally turns out that he is incompetent at everything other than U2. The financial planning and discretion have been horrible, which tells me that amongst all these people running the show there are few adults. Who makes a Broadway show that has basically no chance of making money? What s the point?
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Tue 8 Feb, 2011 12:17 pm
@sozobe,
I remember when they put out snippets of the Bono and Edge music online when they made the announcement of the project awhile back and it utterly stank.

I assumed I was just being too picky and that most musical going people and critics just might like it. So far the critics have openly and collectively shunned the actual musical itself.
0 Replies
 
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Tue 8 Feb, 2011 12:21 pm
@hawkeye10,
Quote:
Who makes a Broadway show that has basically no chance of making money? What s the point?

That's the basic premise of Mel Brooks' The Producers and the majority of horrible horrible horrible films created by the German director Uwe Boll.

He'd make films so bad that he'd make these hideous flops that at one time passed through a German tax loophole. Lost money at the box office but made his financial backers a good deal of money via the massive tax breaks. The loophole's been closed for at least a couple of years now.
0 Replies
 
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Tue 22 Feb, 2011 07:15 pm
@tsarstepan,
Quote:
The Zero Dollar Spider-Man Musical Will Open the Day Before the $65 Million One
2/22/11 at 2:15 PM

http://nymag.com/daily/entertainment/2011/02/spider-man_3.html?mid=372624&rid=122590651
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Tue 22 Feb, 2011 07:18 pm
@tsarstepan,
Cool...I bet some hot shot punk lawyer would take up the case for free though, seems like parody of a show that is ripe for parody should win approval from the courts.
0 Replies
 
hawkeye10
 
  0  
Reply Mon 7 Mar, 2011 08:40 pm
Quote:
Published: March 7, 2011

The producers of Broadway’s “Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark” were negotiating on Monday with their director, Julie Taymor, for her to work with a newly expanded creative team to fix the critically derided, $65 million musical or possibly leave the show, according to people who work on “Spider-Man” or have been briefed on the negotiations.

The artistic direction under consideration for “Spider-Man” — twice as expensive as any show in Broadway history — involves more decisions than just Ms. Taymor’s future, according to these people, who spoke anonymously because the producers have insisted that no information be disclosed about the talks.

The producers and Ms. Taymor and her co-creators, Bono and the Edge of U2, are also discussing how extensively to overhaul the script and music; how many outside consultants should be hired, and who; and when to open the show, which set a record at its Sunday matinee for the most preview performances ever, its 98th. (The previous record was set in 1969 by Jackie Mason’s “A Teaspoon Every Four Hours.”)
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/08/theater/spider-man-director-faces-tough-choices-including-her-exit.html?_r=1&hp

It is a little late in the game for the money to figure out that they hired the wrong woman for the job.....like at least a year. This is going to add a great deal to the problems of women getting hired in creative control positions, because the lesson here is that Hollywood is smart to keep women far away from the director's chair. I have no doubt that when the book is written on this disaster that money will say that they did not pull Julie because she is a woman and they knew that there would be bad press if they fired a woman that they would not have gotten if the fired incompetent director had been a man.

The take home is avoid the problem, dont hire women.
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Mon 7 Mar, 2011 09:10 pm
@hawkeye10,
Interesting also that this happens on the same day as Tina Brown's roll out of the new Newsweek is getting slammed..although in Browns case the prevailing wisdom is that she might be able to fix it.
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  2  
Reply Mon 7 Mar, 2011 10:43 pm
@tsarstepan,
tsarstepan wrote:
Does anyone of you feel compelled to see this $65 million dollar train wreck?
I don 't even like the comic book.
0 Replies
 
hawkeye10
 
  2  
Reply Wed 9 Mar, 2011 12:54 pm
Quote:
A lead producer of “Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark” has told at least two investors and one other person involved with the Broadway musical that its director, Julie Taymor, will step aside once negotiations about complex contractual matters like her creative legal rights and her considerable financial stake in any profits are concluded, according to the investors and a person in a senior position within the show’s management.

All three people, who spoke anonymously because the producer, Michael Cohl, has asked that information remain private, said that he had told Ms. Taymor that she had to step aside so the producers could bring in a new team to overhaul the $65 million production
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/10/theater/julie-taymor-spider-man.html?_r=1&hp

These jokers are a year late and tens of millions of dollars short.
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Wed 9 Mar, 2011 03:34 pm
@hawkeye10,
Yeah. Its a sad thing.
I 'm glad that I never liked Spiderman, from an artistic perspective.

In the 1940s and 50s, my favorite was Superman.
I had several dedicated comic book collections of Supeman Comics
and Action Comics. I still have them. Tho I paid, a nickel or a dime for them,
thay 've been sold at auction for hundreds of $$ @.

I was working on good collections of comic books and guns.

I also had collections of silver dollars, $1O gold pieces and kaleidoscopes
Collecting can be fun.





David
0 Replies
 
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Fri 11 Mar, 2011 02:26 am
Quote:
After months of accidents, ballooning costs, terrible reviews, and gleeful public rubbernecking, Julie Taymor is officially out as the director of the beleaguered Broadway musical, Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark.
Last month, when critics collectively descended upon the show (which was then, as now, still in previews), I noted how the story of Spider-Man had really become a story about Taymor, who was being depicted as character in a Greek tragedy of her own making. The director and co-book writer also earned comparisons to Arachne, Spider-Man's ancient, eight-legged antagonist. (Vulture's Scott Brown described the show as being "about an artist locked in a death grapple with her subject, a tumultuous relationship between a talented, tormented older woman and a callow young stud.")
Now that Taymor's been booted, writers are coming up with a whole new set of similes for her condition. On the New Yorker's Web site, Michael Schulman is "reminded of the late stages of Hillary Clinton's 2008 Presidential campaign, when it was clear to everybody in the world but Clinton that the numbers weren't going to add up."
Ultimately, Taymor was blinded by her own strengths: persistence, passion, and unforgiving originality. Let's hope that she can ride those qualities, as Hillary Clinton did, to something new and big ...
In the New York Times, Taymor's friend Jeffrey Horowitz, artistic director of New York's Theater for a New Audience, uses a maternal metaphor:
Julie's an extremely sensitive person, and she has always felt like a mother to her plays, a mother to her characters ... This is like a mother being taken away from her family. She loves that family. She wants that family.
The Associated Press, meanwhile, seems to quote a comparison of Taymor's own fashioning, from her TED talk last week:
"I'm in The Crucible right now," she said, referring to the Arthur Miller play about the Salem witch trials. "It's trial by fire."
That last metaphor is so juicy, so resonant—a woman being persecuted by an angry mob!—but it may actually be too good to be true: When the New York Times' ArtsBeat blogprinted the same quote, it made it sound like Taymor was just referring to a generic crucible. She also compared the eight-year experience of developing Spider-Man to scaling twin volcanoes, which she once did in Indonesia—a useful reminder that, regardless of her current situation, Julie Taymor is a badass.
The New York Post's Michael Riedel reports that Bono is going to be stepping up as the show's creative honcho. Along with a new creative team—including director Philip William McKinley and playwright and Spider-Man comics scribe Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa—he plans to "rip the show apart from top to bottom," says a source.
I'm dubious about this overhaul. Perhaps the new team will manage to completely revamp the show. More likely, they'll produce a slightly more coherent mess. Will theatergoers really prefer that to Taymor's glorious trainwreck?
http://www.slate.com/blogs/blogs/browbeat/
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Wed 9 Nov, 2011 12:51 am
Quote:
The director Julie Taymor, a key creator of the Broadway musical “Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark,” sued the producers of that $75 million show in federal court on Tuesday, claiming that they were profiting from her creative contributions without compensating her. The lawsuit seeks at least $1 million from the producers, as well as future royalty payments.
Multimedia


Ms. Taymor, the Tony Award-winning director of “The Lion King” and other musicals and films, has been wrangling with the producers over money and artistic credit ever since they fired her as the director of “Spider-Man” in March. The dismissal shocked Ms. Taymor, her associates and friends said in the spring, adding that she was especially galled that the producers continued to use much of her staging and script contributions, even after a much-ballyhooed overhaul of the musical in April and May. Ms. Taymor’s union has already been pursuing an arbitration claim against the “Spider-Man” producers, Michael Cohl and Jeremiah J. Harris, claiming she is owed more than $500,000, but that arbitration proceeding has become protracted.

The lawsuit claims that the producers continued to use about 25 percent of her original script contributions in the musical, but that she is not being paid royalties for that work. Charles T. Spada, a lawyer representing Ms. Taymor, said in a statement on Tuesday that the “Spider-Man” producers had violated Ms. Taymor’s creative rights on the show, which she developed over seven years with the show’s composers, Bono and the Edge, of U2.


http://www.nytimes.com/2011/11/09/theater/deposed-director-taymor-files-suit-over-spider-man-fees.html

I wonder if the producers can counter-sue for the $20 million or what ever it was that they lost do to her horrible work??

I'd say that it is pretty clear that Taymor is unemployable now, the only question is how long will it be before anyone takes a chance on a woman again? This go has been a disaster.
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

your favourite musicals - Discussion by annis
Broadway Musical Elimination Game Round 3!!!!!! - Discussion by Frankdmusic13
Broadway Musical Elimination tie breaker - Question by Frankdmusic13
Which is better; Musicals or Plays? - Question by blueprince
The best musical of all time? - Discussion by jespah
I WANT*... SONGS! - Question by tsarstepan
What's the worst musicals of all time? - Question by tsarstepan
Musical lip-syncing in older movies - Question by RichardOJohnson
 
  1. Forums
  2. » The Unmitigated Disaster that is the Spiderman musical.
Copyright © 2019 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 10/19/2019 at 10:27:43