24
   

Do you donate?

 
 
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Wed 9 Feb, 2011 01:53 pm
@firefly,
Quote:
These are not "lazy people", Hawkeye, these are often very hard-working people who have been most severely affected by the recession, or have become victims of layoffs and the high unemployment rate, or who can't financially cope with rising prices in all areas--including the costs of food. And, until the government does a better job of helping such needy people, they will be in need of donations from the private sector, because they are going hungry right now--hunger isn't something that can wait until later
If we dont short circuit the process through charity hunger will drive reforms/revolution to address the problems that have caused hunger. Some of these problems are societal and some are personal, but none of these problems will ever get solved unless we generate the will to address them. Pain is not only useful but is a required part of life, I not only dont share your view that we should alleviate pain where ever we find it as quickly as we can but I find your type to be fools, and the CAUSE of so much of what has gone wrong with our civilization. Just look at the rape thread, where in your attempt to keep from having even one woman coming away from a sexual encounter feeling victimized you show yourself willing to cancel every one's individual rights and impose police state tactics of sexual regulation, because for you pain avoidance trumps everything else.

Listen up, people are stronger than you give them credit for, pain and hunger are not pleasant experiences but rarely are they going to kill an American, and they often will motivate individuals and the collective to make necessary changes when nothing else will. There is a hell of a lot wrong with America, we have lots to fix, the feminists running sex law is just the tip of the iceberg, and I am not interested in taking part in any stalling tactics. I understand that others will, and that is their right, but I will not be part of it.
firefly
 
  1  
Reply Wed 9 Feb, 2011 03:12 pm
@hawkeye10,
Quote:
There is a hell of a lot wrong with America, we have lots to fix, the feminists running sex law is just the tip of the iceberg, and I am not interested in taking part in any stalling tactics. I understand that others will, and that is their right, but I will not be part of it.


Are you still so obsessed with your personal paranoia about "feminists running sex law" that you drag your conspiracy theories and your pro-rape attitude into every thread--no matter how irrelevant? Try thinking about something other than your own sexual gratification for a change. That's not the topic we are talking about.

Yes, there is a lot wrong with America right now, and that includes still being in a recession which has left many unemployed, underemployed, or struggling to barely stay afloat in low paying jobs. And that translates into many people rather suddenly being unable to meet their basic needs, and their children's needs, including needs for food--and that's why there has been a dramatic increase in the demands being made on food banks, and why donations are needed. Hunger is an immediate need, Hawkeye--regardless of your rather cavalier view that rarely is it "going to kill an American" and your seeing it as a positive motivator to drive some future social revolution.

The problem right now is our economy, a lingering severe recession, and many of those affected in a devastating way are neither "lazy people" nor those who have always struggled with poverty--hard working, middle class families in my area, and all across the country, have fallen on very hard times through no fault of their own. And your lack of empathy, or concern, or compassion is staggering. The soul destroying pain of seeing your children go hungry is not "useful" nor should it be "a required part of life" for anyone--not in the country I live in.

You don't have to be part of the solution, or donate to causes like food banks, but you seem to be divorced from the reality of our current economic climate and how it is impacting people. Rather than call yourself "Hawkeye", you should really change your name to Blind-As-A-Bat.
hawkeye10
 
  0  
Reply Wed 9 Feb, 2011 03:52 pm
@firefly,
Quote:
The problem right now is our economy, a lingering severe recession,
Our problem is not the recession, our economic system has been hollowed out over 30 years time, our economic inequality has been getting worse for longer, the only part the recession plays is to make the problems more difficult to ignore right now. Several decades of ever expanding food banks has only served to mask the problem and to rub out any will to deal with the problem, what you claim as a solution has already proven to be a failure, and yet you keep pushing it. We would have been better off of the food banks never existed, because we would have been working on the problems because we would not have been able to avoid the problems, and if we were smart we would close them all right now.

Supplying Food banks, aid to Haiti, giving money to the panhandlers....they are all part of the same problem....Feel good projects by the do-gooders that not only do not help the human condition over the long run, but are responsible for the continuation of pain through the short circuiting of the creation of the will to solve the problems.
hawkeye10
 
  0  
Reply Wed 9 Feb, 2011 05:34 pm
@hawkeye10,
And another thing Firefly.....if you go back to the posts at A2K about the economy around the time of the crash, a lot of these posts were exchanges with CI, you will see that it was me more than anyone else who was pointing out what a devastating blow this recession is to scores of Americans. For you to come on now claiming that I dont see what is going on, that I dont see how much hurt there is out there in the land, leads me to conclude that either you have not been paying the least bit of attention to my posts and line of reasoning, or that you are once again lying for dramatic effect in the hopes that your argument can prevail even though you have the weaker case. What ever credibility you once had around A2K you should by all rights have lost by way of your conduct in the rape thread, and you have lost it with me.
0 Replies
 
firefly
 
  1  
Reply Thu 10 Feb, 2011 06:05 am
@hawkeye10,
For someone who ostensibly argues for social change, and revolution arising out of discontent, Hawkeye, you certainly aren't happy with the outcome of such changes, particularly if you feel they wind up disadvantaging you in some way. Such a "revolution" occurred with the women's movement--spearheaded by your dreaded "feminists"--which resulted in women gaining the vote, greater gender equality, and greater political power on the part of women. You continue to rail against "feminists", and the issue of female power and influence, even in threads such as this one, where the issue is irrelevant to the topic. So, your professed advocacy for social change, and the ridding of inequities, has a rather hollow ring to it. Be careful what you wish for, Hawkeye...you aren't always happy with the results. Laughing

Quote:
I dont donate money except to organizations that I am a part of...

That's your philosophy of charitable giving, Hawkeye--you only support what benefits you directly--you aren't interested in contributing to something that only benefits other people. When it comes to concern for others, your stance is one of bystander apathy.

Oh sure, you profess to advocate for social change, to eradicate what you see as the underlying causes of problems, such as increased demand at food banks due to the recession, but that's a lot like standing idly by while your neighbor's house burns down and delivering a speech about the causes of fires, rather than helping to save anyone in the house, or helping to put out the fire, or even offering your neighbor a coat to wear now that he has nothing left of his own.
Quote:
Supplying Food banks, aid to Haiti, giving money to the panhandlers....they are all part of the same problem....Feel good projects by the do-gooders that not only do not help the human condition over the long run, but are responsible for the continuation of pain through the short circuiting of the creation of the will to solve the problems.

You miss the point that urgent problems, like the plight of earthquake victims in Haiti, who are suddenly left without food, water, or shelter, or those in your own community who are suddenly laid off from a job in the midst of a recession, and consequently face foreclosure/homelessness and the hunger of their children, require both immediate intervention as well as long term solutions. Whether or not you care to offer assistance, you seem oblivious to the need for immediate action--for a humanitarian response--to alleviate very real human suffering. In fact, you take the position that their suffering is good for these people.
Quote:
Pain is not only useful but is a required part of life, I not only dont share your view that we should alleviate pain where ever we find it as quickly as we can but I find your type to be fools, and the CAUSE of so much of what has gone wrong with our civilization...

Well, Hawkeye, I would rather be a fool who does try to alleviate the pain and suffering of my fellow man, than share your detached, jaundiced, and unfeeling, stance toward other people. Some of us can actually multi-task, Hawkeye, we can work toward long term solutions without ignoring those aspects of a problem that require immediate action and a more altruistic attitude.

Don't worry, Hawkeye, no one will ever accuse you of being a "do-gooder".
0 Replies
 
firefly
 
  1  
Reply Thu 10 Feb, 2011 06:18 am
This kind of donation is just awe-inspiring to me. People like this coach are the true heroes among us. What a selfless and compassionate act...
Quote:

The New York Times
February 9, 2011
Wake Forest Baseball Coach Donates Kidney to Player
By MIKE TIERNEY

ATLANTA — When Wake Forest offered him a baseball scholarship, outfielder Kevin Jordan focused his research on what any high school athlete would: the opportunity for playing time.

His father, Keith, had another set of priorities: Who is this coach, Tom Walter? Will he look out for my son?

Keith Jordan dug back to the coach’s previous tenure at the University of New Orleans. He discovered that, even though Hurricane Katrina had left Walter’s home in 12 feet of water, attention to his team’s needs never wavered.

Walter supervised the players’ temporary relocation to the campus of New Mexico State. And he vowed to assist anyone weighing a transfer to another college.

“A lot of coaches wouldn’t have done that,” Jordan said Wednesday.

Far fewer would do what Walter did this week: donate a kidney to a player. Among the many questions Jordan had posed about the coach, one had never occurred to him: Would he part with a vital organ if his son needed it?

“Any player on the team, past or present,” Walter said during a good-news conference at Emory University Hospital, two days after surgeons transferred one of his kidneys into Kevin Jordan.

The coach and the player sat in front of cameras and microphones at a table bedecked with Wake Forest caps — a scene reminiscent of the day last week when football recruits across the nation wore the hats of the colleges they had chosen.

This event was different, distinguished by the white-coated surgeons who flanked the athlete — and by the player’s periodic wincing from the fresh, deep incision in his right side.

“I didn’t ask,” said Jordan, a freshman from Columbus, Ga., who was not a transplant match with family members. “He volunteered. I’m just really thankful.”

Walter’s sacrifice was no surprise to the man who hired him at Wake Forest.

“He loves his players so much, it is unique,” Athletic Director Ron Wellman said by telephone from Winston-Salem, N.C. He, too, had looked into how Walter, 42, treated his players after Katrina. Wellman concluded, “It was remarkable.”

Speaking at Emory on Wednesday, the coach’s mother, Ann Walter, said: “He has a soft spot in his heart for kids. They are like family. He always stuck up for people that didn’t have the advantages he had.”

In high school, Walter sat during lunchtime with a special education student who was picked on by others and threatened to punch anyone who was tempted to be a bully.

Walter enjoyed his college days at Georgetown so much that he said the thought of Jordan sitting in a dorm room tethered at least eight hours daily to a dialysis machine — as Jordan was last semester — was unacceptable.

“It just breaks your heart,” Walter said.

He said that his motivation in donating a kidney was not getting back Jordan as a player, but giving him “just a chance to be a college freshman.”

“I couldn’t believe what he had endured,” Walter said. “It was obvious to me this was the right thing to do from Day 1.”

That day arrived last fall, soon after Jordan, 19, was found to have ANCA vasculitis, a rare kidney disorder resulting from autoimmune swelling. The diagnosis took months to pin down.

Keith Jordan recalled one of many unsettling days at the hospital when his cellphone rang with what would customarily be a joyous call. Given the frightening uncertainty of his son’s health, it barely registered when the Yankees informed him that they had selected his son in the 19th round of the amateur draft.

Kevin Jordan managed to pass all his classes in his first term and practice with the team when he did not have to be on a dialysis machine. His power and speed were noticeably lacking from what Walter had seen during his recruiting trips to Columbus.

In qualifying as a donor match, Walter, a father of a son and a daughter, beat odds of about 7 to 1, according to Dr. Kenneth Newell, who handled the first half of the transplant. Assured that he could resume a normal lifestyle — the original kidney donor in 1954, Newell said Wednesday, lived until last year — and aware that Jordan could languish on a national donor list for up to five years, Walter said he never thought twice about his pledge.

Newell and Dr. Allan Kirk, who operated on Jordan, said that medical advances have increased the success rate of matches and transplants.

A recipient, Kirk said, “receives an extra 10 years of life” over a dialysis patient. “Kevin should live a life that is normal in activity and normal in length,” he said.

Their story has resonated across the country, nowhere more movingly than in Dallas. In 2007, in an action that received widespread publicity, the retired Cowboys cornerback Everson Walls donated a kidney to ex-teammate Ron Springs.

“That was amazing,” an ebullient Walls said by phone Wednesday of Walter’s donation. “Just amazing.”

Walls said he was especially impressed that, unlike he and Springs, Walter and Jordan were members of different age and racial groups.

The transplant raised the inevitable question of whether Wake Forest violated an N.C.A.A. rule by providing an “extra benefit” to an athlete, defined as a special arrangement not made available to other university students. Wake Forest’s Wellman acknowledged that an extra benefit was indeed conferred.

“No doubt about that,” he said. “I dare anyone to challenge this benefit.”

Erik Christianson, director of public and media relations for the N.C.A.A., said: “We wish Coach Walter and Kevin Jordan all the best. This wonderful act of compassion and generosity is truly extraordinary, beyond the scope of any rule.”

Walter said, “We answer to a higher calling on this one.” He said he plans to attend practice this week and to fill out the lineup card at the season opener Feb. 18.

Jordan can expect to pick up a bat in eight weeks for practice swings, Kirk said.

“I’m definitely going to play hard for Coach,” Jordan said. “I can’t say no to him. I’ve got his body part in me.”
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/10/sports/baseball/10transplant.html

0 Replies
 
Ionus
 
  1  
Reply Thu 9 Jun, 2011 02:26 am
When I was young and single I was an avid sperm donor... to the best of my knowledge none of the young ladies I gave it to used it effectively though . I later used to donate blood but after getting malaria was told they didnt want me for whole blood, so I quit that too . I have donated money for some projects to help industrial independence in third world countries.... but thats about it . Oh and some ex-soldier or military widow charities I usually give a small donation to .
0 Replies
 
Reyn
 
  1  
Reply Fri 10 Jun, 2011 07:41 pm
@Mame,
Mame wrote:

[...] but I donate clothes, furniture, [...]

Yup. We're pretty much the same way. We donate to a thrift organization, and we also buy at their stores here.

We also help out our daughter who's bought her own apartment and sometimes things need doing.
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Fri 10 Jun, 2011 08:57 pm

Sometimes its fun to donate wallet$
fulla money for Christmas or birthdays, etc.





David
0 Replies
 
FBM
 
  1  
Reply Sat 11 Jun, 2011 12:20 am
Oh, yeah. I donate monthly to the Somaly Mam Foundation. It finds child prostitutes in Cambodia, takes them out of the trade and gives them enough education to get a job doing something else for a living.
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Sat 11 Jun, 2011 01:27 am

Its also fun to donate automatic umbrellas surreptitiously stuffed
fulla clandestine cash that falls on the victim when she or he opens it to test the mechanism.

Sometimes thay yell when that happens.





David
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Sat 11 Jun, 2011 01:30 am

Can anyone else think of some clever, creative ways to donate ?





David
FBM
 
  1  
Reply Sat 11 Jun, 2011 04:07 am
@OmSigDAVID,
Give a book and slip a few bills between the pages, maybe...
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Sat 11 Jun, 2011 05:43 am
When I see a cause, I try to help. Occasionally with money, but often other things. I don't have a lot of resources to do more.
noinipo
 
  1  
Reply Sat 11 Jun, 2011 05:47 am
@edgarblythe,
Once a year I donate to Doctors without Borders,
the only group I trust and support.
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Sat 11 Jun, 2011 05:57 am
@FBM,
FBM wrote:
Give a book and slip a few bills between the pages, maybe...
That is a very fine idea; (actually, I have DONE that).
I 'm thinking of doing it AGAIN. I have a youthful target in mind.
If thay r new bills, thay make excellent bookmarks.

C'mon, people! Let 's have some more creative ideas for GIFT$$





David
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Sat 11 Jun, 2011 01:31 pm
@noinipo,
That is a trustworthy organization.
0 Replies
 
Wyngs
 
  1  
Reply Tue 23 Aug, 2011 03:46 am
@Mame,
My wife and I like to go to the dollar store, where we spend $40-$70 on appropriate treats, toys, etc, to fill a box and mail it out to some deserving individual. We prefer children, but have done adults also. We remain anonymous - not providing a return address.

Our problem is getting names, addresses and histories of possible recipients. Neither of us wish to go thru any organization. We want to know what is sent and that they get everything we send.

Is there anyone, trustworthy, who would have such information? I know that we would likely have to be acredited in some way, as I can see the danger in handing out such information to strangers. But I'm 73 and my wife is 72, so I don't think that part should be too difficult.

Thanks in advance for any information.

[email protected]
jcboy
 
  1  
Reply Tue 23 Aug, 2011 03:55 am
@Mame,
There is a place in St. Pete called Metro Charities. I’ve donated furniture, clothing etc. Last June I donated a painting to St. Pete Pride to be auctioned off at one of there fund raisers. I tried donating blood once but was turned down. Gay men are still banned from donating blood.
0 Replies
 
jespah
 
  1  
Reply Tue 23 Aug, 2011 06:01 am
@Wyngs,
The possibility of you being scammed is extremely high unless you go through some sort of organization. But, really, a soup kitchen or something like St. Vincent de Paul would have people coming in. If these individuals wanted to give you their address then no one is stopping them from doing so (I doubt that the organizations would be permitted to just hand over addresses). Me? I would find it creepy and upsetting for someone to be asking me for my address so that they could send me charity.
 

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