24
   

Do you donate?

 
 
Miller
 
  1  
Reply Tue 8 Feb, 2011 11:57 am
@OmSigDAVID,
OmSigDAVID wrote:


I give to the International Association of Near Death Studies

David


Do you trust them?
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Tue 8 Feb, 2011 12:06 pm
@Miller,
OmSigDAVID wrote:


I give to the International Association of Near Death Studies

David
Miller wrote:

Do you trust them?
No, but I am not called upon to DO that.

I 've had some out-of-body-experiences;
therefore, I know, from first-hand experience
that consciousness does not depend for its existence
upon the material flesh & bones.





David
0 Replies
 
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Tue 8 Feb, 2011 12:08 pm
@Mame,
On a limited budget, I donate money to NPR and the American Cancer Society. I also donate books to the NYPL for them to resell for whatever little funds they can.

I used to donate platelets but stopped due to the frustration that came with the past failure of 4 of the last 5 times. I suppose I should at least try to donate blood. The process should be easier to complete at the NY Bloodcenter then the much preferred platelet donations.
FBM
 
  1  
Reply Tue 8 Feb, 2011 12:34 pm
@tsarstepan,
Here's irony for ya. I used to donate platelets to kids with leukemia whenever the hospital called saying they were in need, which was pretty often. Several years later, I was diagnosed with adult-onset ITP (idiopathic thrombocytopenia purpura), an auto-immune disease that leaves me with only about 10~15% of the normal platelet count. I guess no good deed goes unpunished, eh?
Ceili
 
  1  
Reply Tue 8 Feb, 2011 12:42 pm
I'm curious, do Americans still get paid to donate blood? Or is that just another case of misinformation?
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Tue 8 Feb, 2011 12:51 pm
@Ceili,
Quote:
I'm curious, do Americans still get paid to donate blood? Or is that just another case of misinformation
Whole blood is volunteer, plasma is paid. It is routine for university students to sell plasma for about $50 a pint (might be off a bit on the price, but it is substantial).

The whole blood program is run by the Red Cross, and has been so poorly done that there are loud calls to take it away from them. They I think use it to raise revenue for their other programs, as I know that the blood that is given for free by us ends up being sold to hospitals.
0 Replies
 
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Tue 8 Feb, 2011 01:05 pm
@Ceili,
With the New York Bloodcenter, we can get redeemable points for donating platelets. I always donated my points back to the Bloodcenter rather then redeem them.

No points or compensation for blood donation. So pay for blood donation gig has went away a while back. At least it wasn't a policy when I moved to NYC 8 years ago.
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Tue 8 Feb, 2011 01:06 pm
@FBM,
FBM? Well that's just a bizarre turn of events. Shocked
Ceili
 
  1  
Reply Tue 8 Feb, 2011 03:12 pm
I'm not sure what redeemable point are...
The Red Cross in Canada is mainly a disaster relief organization. They no longer have anything to do with blood. Several years ago, they were stripped of this obligation after a major class action suit brought on by people who were given tainted blood, resulting in way too many people getting AIDS and/or hepatitis.
We've never been paid to donate either blood or platelets, strictly volunteer. I don't believe our hospitals pay for blood. We have a different health care system, not for profit, but I do believe the government compensates the Canadian Blood Services who do the collection now.
I have given blood on many occasion, however I've also been banned at times because I've traveled to countries that are deemed unsafe.
Banned might be too strong of a word, but you get my drift.
I couldn't give after I'd been to Mexico, Belize, India and Thailand. I'm not sure if this is now the case or not. It changes based on the diseases that are prevalent in each place.
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Tue 8 Feb, 2011 03:19 pm
@tsarstepan,
tsarstepan wrote:
With the New York Bloodcenter, we can get redeemable points for donating platelets.
I always donated my points back to the Bloodcenter rather then redeem them.

No points or compensation for blood donation.
So pay for blood donation gig has went away a while back.
At least it wasn't a policy when I moved to NYC 8 years ago.
Its MY policy in NYC now to keep my blood exactly where it IS.





David
0 Replies
 
FBM
 
  1  
Reply Tue 8 Feb, 2011 09:58 pm
@tsarstepan,
tsarstepan wrote:

FBM? Well that's just a bizarre turn of events. Shocked


Ain't it, though? I just had surgery 2 weeks ago and had to get a platelet transfusion. If there's a lesson to be learned from this, it eludes me.
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Wed 9 Feb, 2011 12:13 am
@tsarstepan,
I think there is an operation in town that collects blood and pays for it. United Blood Service does not. They do furnish cookies and some kind of juice - like substance. I have tried it, and plan ahead to not be dehydrated.
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Wed 9 Feb, 2011 01:03 am
@roger,
Quote:
Do America's Blood Centers members pay donors for giving blood?

America's Blood Centers members are volunteer donor supported organizations. They do not pay for blood donations. FDA rules say that blood used for transfusions cannot be "bought." Studies show that volunteer donors provide a safer blood supply.

http://www.americasblood.org/go.cfm?do=page.view&pid=13#do_members_pay

Quote:
A reader named Jeff Stier wrote to inform us of the upcoming Angels in Waiting Third Annual Blood Drive in Memory of Joel Kirshner, for which Stier is the project director. Last year, the event was the largest mobile blood drive in the history of the New York Blood Center. For the past two years, the organizers have offered donors free “pint for a pint” coupons from Ben & Jerry’s. This year, they considered switching the gift to one-day passes to Manhattan’s high-end Reebok Sports Club. The gym agreed to donate 200 passes, valued at $35 each.

The plan hit a snag when Robert Purvis, vice president and executive director for New York Blood Services, stepped in with news of FDA regulations that prohibit compensation for blood donation. Stier summarizes :

[Purvis] explained that they are bound by FDA guidelines regulating “gifts” given to blood donors. He said, for instance, that any passes we hand out cannot be called “compensation” but rather something along the lines of “recognition.”

Specifically, the FDA prohibits any gifts to blood donors in excess of $25 in cumulative value, meaning that the gym passes were forbidden. So Stier came up with the following solution:

nstead of giving the Reebok passes to “blood donors” –which is not allowed — we are going to give gym passes to the first 200 people who come to the event, regardless of whether they donate. They just have to register as future volunteers with Angels In Waiting
http://freakonomics.blogs.nytimes.com/2007/06/04/how-much-for-that-pint-of-blood/

Quote:
"We have some of the lowest prices in the region," Doddridge said. "Our goal will be to moderate price increases in the future."

His St. Petersburg blood bank charges hospitals $185 for a pint of whole blood, while Community Blood Centers and Florida's Blood Centers each charge $200.
http://www.palmbeachpost.com/money/blood-bank-merger-announced-hospitals-fear-monopoly-1056745.html all though the way I understand it is that technically the blood is free, but the $200 is a processing fee, not that this rhetoric has any connection to reality..
0 Replies
 
Ionus
 
  1  
Reply Wed 9 Feb, 2011 03:16 am
Am I the only one who donates at the sperm bank ? What about the women here ? Do they do withdrawals ?
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Wed 9 Feb, 2011 03:56 am
@roger,
roger wrote:
I think there is an operation in town that collects blood and pays for it.
United Blood Service does not.
Transylvanian National Bank
roger
 
  1  
Reply Wed 9 Feb, 2011 03:59 am
@OmSigDAVID,
Could be. Could also be that I was wrong. There was something in the phone directory that suggested such, but I didn't investigate.
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Wed 9 Feb, 2011 04:13 am
@roger,
roger wrote:
Could be. Could also be that I was wrong.
There was something in the phone directory that suggested such, but I didn't investigate.
More interest for night deposits.
0 Replies
 
firefly
 
  1  
Reply Wed 9 Feb, 2011 12:00 pm
@hawkeye10,
Quote:
Once in awhile I donate to food banks, but I have a idealistic problem with that as I think that government should deal with the needy and that reforms should be taken to make our society more equitable. I also firmly believe in the Zen motto "no work, no eat" and have no desire to help feed lazy people.

I don't think that the government does an effective job of helping the needy, particularly the hungry needy or those they now call "food insecure". And the recession has dramatically escalated the scope of the problem and often overwhelmed the resources of food banks, many of which in the U.S. saw a 40% increase in demand over the past two years.
Quote:
There has been a dramatic increase in the number of households classified as “food insecure.” In 2008, 21 percent of all households with children fell into this category, the highest percentage since 1995 when yearly measurement started, and a nearly 25 percent increase from 2007. While enrollment in federal food and nutrition assistance programs is up since the start of the recent recession (e.g. Supplement Nutrition Assistance Program participation increased by 17.5 percent between July 2009 and July 2010), we have yet to see whether increased enrollment is providing families with access to sufficient nutritious food for children.

The recession has exacerbated child hunger throughout the nation
http://www.firstfocus.net/library/reports/the-recession-and-food-security


And the situation is similar in Canada
Quote:

2010 Hunger Count Report

Every year since 1989, Food Banks Canada has issued a report on the level of usage experienced by member organizations. And, as the organization says “Affiliate Member food banks, and their respective agencies serve approximately 85% of people accessing emergency food programs nationwide,” its annual report presents a comprehensive view of the situation.

The 2010 report, released on November 16, 2010 says that “Over the last two years, food bank use in Canada has risen by 28% – an unprecedented rate of growth. After four consecutive years of decline, demand for food banks has skyrocketed since the 2008-09 recession.”

The report says that increased food bank demand was seen in every province in the country.

Almost One Million Canadians Need Food Assistance

According to Food Banks Canada, in March 2010, 867,948 people went to member outlets to emergency food supplies. That’s the highest number ever. Of these, 38% are children and 11% reported some employment income. People receiving government-funded social assistance represent more than half (51%) of the clientele, and those on disability support payments accounted for 15%. Employment Insurance recipients formed six percent of those needing food help...

Stubborn Effects of the Recession

A Canadian Press report (“Food-bank use Skyrockets Due to Lingering Recession: Report.” November 16, 2010) comments that, “people are going hungry partly because they lost their jobs during the recession, and now their unemployment benefits are running out.

“Or, they’ve been able to find new jobs, but often the jobs are in service industries and don’t pay enough to support them.”
http://www.suite101.com/content/food-bank-use-in-canada-leaps-a309869


So, many of those who now access emergency food resources, like food pantries, are the working poor, people who have been hard hit by the recession because their wages are so low, or people who lost jobs in areas like construction, or people who had their work hours cut back, or working single mothers who struggle to feed their children but may often go hungry themselves, or those whose unemployment benefits have run out and they cannot find jobs, or seniors with limited incomes who may have to choose between buying medications or buying food, or formerly middle class families where the breadwinner has lost a job, their resources have been depleted, foreclosure/homelessness may be looming, and they suddenly find themselves in the painful position of having to ask for food assistance so they can feed their children and themselves.

These are not "lazy people", Hawkeye, these are often very hard-working people who have been most severely affected by the recession, or have become victims of layoffs and the high unemployment rate, or who can't financially cope with rising prices in all areas--including the costs of food. And, until the government does a better job of helping such needy people, they will be in need of donations from the private sector, because they are going hungry right now--hunger isn't something that can wait until later. And many groups and organizations that previously provided donations of food or money to food banks have cut back on those because they have also felt the impact of the recession. So, more than ever, donations from individuals are needed.

I cannot share your particular Zen view ("no work no eat") of this situation, Hawkeye, and I am more likely to think, "How would I feel if this was happening to me?"--a notion which I find much more in accord with Zen philosophy, and its compassionate nature--when I am made sadly aware of the fact that some of my neighbors might be going hungry, or that entire families were suddenly showing up at soup kitchens in my area when the effects of the recession first became apparent.

If you don't want to donate to your local food banks that's fine. But if you think that those in immediate need of such services can wait for the government to help them, or that they are nothing more than "lazy people", you are not only lacking in compassion, you are blind to the reality of the situation.



OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Wed 9 Feb, 2011 12:10 pm

Do the rich & the middle classes
have a MORAL obligation to provide free defensive handguns and ammunition to the poor ??





David
Ceili
 
  1  
Reply Wed 9 Feb, 2011 12:50 pm
@OmSigDAVID,
WTF do guns have to do with donating time, money or good works?
Why does every thread you participate have to brought down to the lowest possible common denominator.
0 Replies
 
 

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