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Latin to English Translation Help?

 
 
Reply Thu 27 Jan, 2011 06:28 pm
I'm stuck on a particular part near the beginning of Sallust's Bellum Catilinae. The passage is "Res ipsa hortari videtur, quoniam de moribus civitatis tempus admonuit, supra repetere ac paucis instituta maiorum domi militiaeque, quomodo rem publicam habuerint quantamque reliquerint, ut, paulatim immutata, expulcherruma atque optuma pessuma ac flagitiosisuma facta sit, disserere."

So far I have " Since the ocassion reminded (me) about the character of the state, the affair itself seemed to urge (me) to go back further and to discuss.....

I'm confused on how the case of paucis lets it fit in and I am also confused about domi militiaeque. I haven't gone much further since I can't understand this part, but any help would be very useful. I prefer non-idiomatic translations very much.
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George
 
  2  
Reply Thu 27 Jan, 2011 06:58 pm
@wildflower92490,
"I'm confused on how the case of paucis lets it fit in and I am also confused about
domi militiaeque."

Paucis is a short way of saying paucis verbis, "by a few words" or "in a few words".

Domi miltiaeque is the locative. It means "at home and in military service".
It is often translated by "at home and in the field" or "in peace and war".
wildflower92490
 
  1  
Reply Tue 1 Feb, 2011 01:52 pm
@George,
Thank you George!
George
 
  1  
Reply Tue 1 Feb, 2011 02:08 pm
@wildflower92490,
You're welcome, wildflower92490.
0 Replies
 
wildflower92490
 
  1  
Reply Sun 6 Feb, 2011 07:29 pm
Hi again.

I'm stuck again on a small section. "In tanta tamque corrupta civitate Catilina, id quod factu facillumum erat, omnium flagitiorum atque facinorum circum se tamquam stipatorum catervas habebat."

So far I have "In so great and so corrupt a state, Catiline, id quod factu facillumum erat, was holding crowds of all shameful men and criminals around himself just as bodyguards."

I really have no idea what to do with the subordinate clause. Let me know if the rest looks good too!

Thanks again : )
George
 
  2  
Reply Tue 8 Feb, 2011 07:42 am
@wildflower92490,
Just a quick reply for now -- busy day.

Factu is a supine. Back later to talk about it.
The phrase means "that which was very easy to do",
or "something very easy to do."
George
 
  1  
Reply Sat 12 Feb, 2011 08:21 am
@George,
Here's a good summary of the supine.
wildflower92490
 
  1  
Reply Sun 27 Feb, 2011 12:21 pm
@George,
Ah, thank you. That makes much more sense.
I'm also struggling with this sentence:
"Itaque, quod plerumque in atroci negotio solet, senatus decrevit darent operam consules ne quid res publica detrimenti caperet."

So far I have: "Therefore, that thing which most are accustomed to in a harsh situation, the senate declared that the consuls give their attention in order that the republic...
I have no idea what I'm even saying. I've looked at some English translations to see if I'm doing it right, but I honestly don't know how they're getting from Point A to Point B. Any help would be greatly appreciated. I don't believe I'm understanding the meaning of "quod...solet" and I definitely don't know what quid is going with near the end.
George
 
  1  
Reply Mon 28 Feb, 2011 08:21 am
@wildflower92490,
quod plerumque in atroci negotio solet

Plerumque means "for the most part" or "commonly" in this context.
Solet is singular. Its subject is quod.
It seems that "to be done" (fieri) is implied.

So . . .
"that which, for the most part, is accustomed to be done in a harsh
situation."

This refers to what the Senate decreed -- granting emergency powers to
the consuls.

The phrase
darent operam consules ne quid res publica detrimenti caperet
is the standard way for the Senate to grant such powers, called the
Senatus Consultum Ultimum. Quid means "anything" (we'd expect
quidquam) in this context.

"the consuls should give their attention lest (ne) the republic suffer
any harm (anything of harm).
wildflower92490
 
  1  
Reply Mon 28 Feb, 2011 12:08 pm
@George,
Thank you very much! I definitely understand it now. "Quid" was by far confusing me the most and I didn't think that I had "plerumque" right.
George
 
  1  
Reply Mon 28 Feb, 2011 12:12 pm
@wildflower92490,
You're welcome, Wildflower.
0 Replies
 
kiuku
 
  1  
Reply Mon 9 Dec, 2013 06:10 pm
@wildflower92490,
It's Greek letter head talking about the war. It's a hard one. I don't see why you need help on it from this forum, because it's a hard one, done by literate people already, like sports. Sallust in my opinions means the holy one so I just think that means the word of the Lord, word of Caesar, describes the war. It says basically just "To return your call, on the state of contentious affairs (which means war)" Paucis means quickly speaking, to quickly state, rather than dramatically state, to reason though where reason is sufficient, that's paucis

domi militaeque means the area of the law, citizens.

I could translate the whole thing but it's high art. I mean, order it, by paypal. I'm very good at it.

"supra repetere ac paucis instituta maiorum domi militiaeque"

Speaking on behalf of the citizens of the majority republic.

domi militiaeque: domicile of the militia)
maiorum: means government but it's the language, majority, is the actual word, from which we get elected officials like mayors, the majority though, the rights, like today, the agreed upon. The Arabic word for world is duly related, the word for matters as well. So this is the agreed upon state.
kiuku
 
  1  
Reply Mon 9 Dec, 2013 06:28 pm
@kiuku,
In decency I suggest:

"quomodo rem publicam habuerint quantamque reliquerint, ut, paulatim immutata, expulcherruma atque optuma pessuma ac flagitiosisuma facta sit, disserere"

I received by hand a publication,(a word basically, a scroll), a matter of utmost importance: the crying of teenage men, the practical pessimism that practically beats us on a cross, of sadness, of the vanity, of men.

paulatim immutata: matter of utmost importance

quid means happening

quo means word here, like quote, quomodo word of mouth, received by hand, rem publicam, brought to him, which altogether means a scroll

expulcherruma: crying
flagitiosisuma: flagellum, suma, beat while on a cross
atque optuma: the first blood, teenagers though, attic means above, optimum, basically teenagers, the first ones
disserere: sick vanity, disease, desire, deserter, dessert, desert, vain, sick

telepathically conceived by God.
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