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Yeast rolls

 
 
Reply Fri 19 Nov, 2010 04:32 pm
I have a real hankering for yeast rolls -- the kind where you can really taste the yeast in that they have an almost malty flavor.

I remembered a restaurant in Tulsa, Oklahoma (Pennington's for ya'll Okies) that made these fabulous rolls so I searched around trying to find the recipe for them with no luck.

I find a lot of recipes for yeast rolls but I'm not sure they're going to be the kind I want. I don't want to spend hours on something and end up with some bland, puffy thing that doesn't have that just right flavor.

Does anyone here have a yeast roll recipe like the one I'm talking about?

Thanks
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Type: Question • Score: 4 • Views: 15,471 • Replies: 86
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Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Nov, 2010 04:41 pm
@boomerang,
You can probably find one here:

http://www.kingarthurflour.com/recipes/yeast-breads-and-rolls/view-all

Specifically, you might want to give this one a try:

http://www.kingarthurflour.com/recipes/malted-golden-grain-rolls-recipe

Here's a description of the malted wheat flakes mentioned in the above recipe:

http://www.kingarthurflour.com/shop/items/malted-wheat-flakes-16-oz
Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Nov, 2010 04:45 pm
@Butrflynet,
Here are some suggested substitutes if you don't have the malted wheat flakes available locally and don't want to order them online:

http://www.foodsubs.com/Flour.html

http://www.foodsubs.com/GrainWheat.html
0 Replies
 
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Nov, 2010 04:46 pm
@Butrflynet,
Yum! Those sound delicious but the ones I'm thinking of are more of a cloverleaf style roll.

They looked like this:

http://www.delish.com/cm/delish/images/potato-clover-rolls-clv-xl-47557214.jpg

I buy that King Arthur flour but I have never visited their website. It looks like they have fab recipes. Thanks for the link!
JPB
 
  2  
Reply Fri 19 Nov, 2010 04:53 pm
@boomerang,
Those look like parker house rolls, boomer.

http://www.wheatlandumc.org/pages/History/Links/Recipes/recipes/ParkerHouseRolls.jpg

Usually they're doubled, but it looks like the ones in your picture were folded into thirds.
0 Replies
 
Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Nov, 2010 05:12 pm
@boomerang,
This blog mentions another local Tulsa cafe and bakery that is now using some of the Pennington recipes:

http://www.tulsafoodblog.com/lunch/comfort-yourself-at-kari-okies

The blog writer mentions her mother having scored some recipes while working there.


Found these recipes from Pennington's:

http://www.tulsaokhistory.com/bitsnpieces/penningtons.html

It also mentions a Pennington's cookbook:

Quote:
Tulsa World newspaper, Scene (May 5, 2004)

"The Missing Link. A reader finds a Pennington's Drive-In cookbook and solves the mystery of the Black Bottom Pie." [article by: Ashley Parrish, World Scene Writer]

Ashley writes ... "If you want to find somebody who remembers Pennington's Drive-In, throw a rock in the air and if it lands on someone who grew up in Tulsa during the '50s or '60s, you've found yourself a memory of Pennington's." [Pennington's closed in the 1980s]

Although Ashley included some neat stories from people about Pennington's the point of Ashley's article was the discovery of a spiral-bound book titled "The Original Pennington's Cookbook," with a forward by Judy Pennington, who writes: "To the many faithful Pennington's customers. I wrote this book for you. You have asked over the past years for our most popular recipes. Some have been printed incorrectly. I wanted to set the record straight. These recipes have been used and kept secret for the past 60 years. I think that is long enough. ... Everyone should know how to make a good cherry limeade or enjoy a piece of Black Bottom Pie at home."

So for those of us who remember the good times at Pennington's ....


Haven't been able to find anything on the cookbook itself or a dinner roll recipe.
0 Replies
 
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Nov, 2010 05:24 pm
I don't think Parker House rolls have that malty flavor though.

Pennington's rolls were to die for Butryflynet. Amazingly good. They served them with honey butter. Yumyumyum.

I found this:

Quote:
Soft pretzel rolls that you get at the ballpark or from a street vendor are easy to re-create at home. This recipe uses a basic dough that’s good to try your hand at if you’re a bread-making novice. And the trick to the malty flavor so key to a good pretzel? The dough takes a dip in a baking soda solution before going into the oven. Try these rolls on their own, dipped in our Sweet Hot Mustard, or toasted in a grilled cheese.
.INGREDIENTS
1 cup warm water (105°F to 115°F)
1 (1/4-ounce) envelope active dry yeast (2 1/4 teaspoons)
2 3/4 cups bread flour
1 tablespoon granulated sugar
1 teaspoon kosher salt, plus more for sprinkling
Vegetable oil
6 cups water
1/4 cup baking soda
INSTRUCTIONS
Place warm water in the bowl of a stand mixer and sprinkle yeast on top. Set aside to rest until mixture bubbles, about 5 minutes. (If the mixture does not bubble, either the liquid was not at the correct temperature or the yeast is old.)
Place flour, sugar, and salt in a large bowl and whisk briefly to break up any lumps and combine. Once yeast is ready, fit the bowl on the mixer, attach a dough hook, and dump in flour mixture. Mix on the lowest setting until dough comes together, then increase to medium speed and mix until dough is elastic and smooth, about 8 minutes.
Form dough into a ball, place in a large oiled mixing bowl, and turn dough to coat in oil. Cover with a clean, damp dishtowel, and let rest in a warm place until dough doubles in size, about 30 to 35 minutes. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper, coat paper with vegetable oil, and set aside.
Once dough has risen, punch it down and knead it on a floured, dry surface just until it becomes smooth and springs back when poked, about 1 minute. Divide dough into 8 pieces and form into oblong rolls. Place rolls on the baking sheet and cut 4 (2-inch) diagonal slashes across the top of each. Cover with a damp towel and let dough rise in a warm place until almost doubled in volume, about 15 to 20 minutes. Meanwhile, heat the oven to 425°F and bring water to a boil in a large saucepan over high heat.
Once rolls have risen, stir baking soda into boiling water (water will foam up slightly). Boil two or three rolls for 2 minutes per side. Using a slotted spoon, remove rolls, drain, and place on the baking sheet, cut side up. Sprinkle well with salt, and repeat with remaining rolls.
Once all rolls are ready, place in the oven and bake until golden brown, about 10 to 12 minutes. Serve hot


Maybe I'll give this a try if nobody come up with a "swear by" recipe. Like I said, I don't want to spend a ton of time on something and get the wrong taste.
Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Nov, 2010 05:25 pm
@boomerang,
That's just the method used for baking them. Little balls of dough are placed close together in large muffin tins and baked.

Check out these recipes:

http://www.kingarthurflour.com/recipes/tender-white-rolls-recipe

http://www.kingarthurflour.com/recipes/amish-dinner-rolls-recipe

http://www.kingarthurflour.com/recipes/mini-picnic-rolls-recipe

0 Replies
 
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Nov, 2010 05:28 pm
Oh!

Quote:
Yeast converts the sugar into carbon dioxide which raises the dough. Most recipes use regular granulated sugar, but Tom Colicchio’s recipe uses barley malt syrup, a molasses-like sweetener that gives the dough a slight malty flavor that is addicting. You can find malt syrup at most grocery stores or you can buy it online. But if you can’t find it, dark corn syrup works just as well.


recipe here: http://theheritagecook.com/?p=5066
0 Replies
 
Butrflynet
 
  2  
Reply Fri 19 Nov, 2010 05:30 pm
@boomerang,
That sounds like a good recipe. You could probably also substitute some of the water with some malted beer to intensify the malt flavor. If you want to get the cloverleaf look, just roll up a bunch of small balls of dough and place 3 of them in each mold of a jumbo muffin tin.

When I've made homemade pretzels and bagels, I sometimes dip them into an egg bath that has been flavored with honey and molasses before baking them. It gives that coveted shiny brown crust that is so tasty.
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Nov, 2010 05:36 pm
Just keeping track . . . i would mention, though, that even if you had the recipe from the Oklahoma restaurant, you wouldn't necessarily get the same result. I bake, and the odds are good that each batch will come out a little different. If you find something you like, work with it until you get something like you expected.
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Nov, 2010 05:36 pm
@Butrflynet,
Maybe I'll give that a try!

I'm just glad to know that I didn't imagine that malt flavor to the bread.
0 Replies
 
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Nov, 2010 05:39 pm
@Setanta,
I'm sure you're right about trial and error being a part of the process. The dreary rains are in full swing so now is a great time to experiement.

But I do want to start with something that suggests a malt flavor instead of a regular recipe.
0 Replies
 
CalamityJane
 
  2  
Reply Fri 19 Nov, 2010 05:57 pm
We have those in Germany, we call them "Laugensemmel" - soo good.
http://www.hofers.com/pretzroll.jpg

Here is the recipe (translated by me)
750 g whole wheat grain flour
1/4 l water
60 g yeast

1/4 l water
1 tablespoon salt

about 1 l water
1 teaspoon baking soda

Give the flour in a bowl and pour the in warm water dissolved yeast in the middle and knead to a dough and let it sit for 30 min. to rise.

Dissolve the salt with lukewarm water and slowly pour to the dough and knead it good for 10 minutes. Cut dough into 16 same sized pieces. and form into round rolls.

Bring water and baking soda to a boil, add a few rolls at a time and let them cook for 30 seconds. The rolls will expand quite a bit, take them out and give the rolls onto a buttered cooking sheet and bake in a preheated oven at 435 F
for 20 minutes.

boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Nov, 2010 06:12 pm
eHow says to increase the yeast flavor in bread use a LOT (1/4 cup instead of a tablespoon) more yeast and some 7-up:



Quote:
Loaf bread, dinner rolls or delicious cinnamon rolls all require one ingredient in common -- yeast. The leavening action of yeast enables the dough to rise to much larger sizes than that of "quick" breads that don't use the ingredient. It also lends a unique, malty taste to such breads. For those who enjoy the yeasty flavors of bread, you can increase the amounts to thicken the taste. Increasing the yeast taste in homemade bread and bread products is an easy endeavor for even the novice baker.


Read more: How to Increase the Yeast Taste in Bread | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/how_7320344_increase-yeast-taste-bread.html#ixzz15mDebz6T

•Add 2 cups of flour, the salt and baking powder to the glass bowl.

•2
Fill the glass with water. Stir in the yeast powder. Ordinarily a recipe of this size only uses about a tablespoon of yeast. To heighten the yeast flavor, we have added more yeast. This will also make the bread rise to a much larger size.

•3
Microwave the cup on high for one minute. This warms it to help activate the yeast faster.

•4
Stir the warm yeast water into the flour mixture. A thick, clumpy paste will form.

•5
Stir in the lemon-lime soda. Use Sprite, 7up or any other brand. The fizzing action of the soda pop adds to the leavening action of the yeast and enhances its flavoring. It does not leave a lemon or lime flavor in the bread recipe because such a small amount is used.


recipe here: http://www.ehow.com/how_7320344_increase-yeast-taste-bread.html

0 Replies
 
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Nov, 2010 06:18 pm
Interesting!

Quote:
Malted Barley Flour
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Malted Barley Flour, also known as Diastatic Malt, improves the flavor and appearance of yeast breads. Add 1/2 to 1 teaspoon for every 3 cups of flour in your favorite bread recipe to give the loaves a slightly sweet flavor and moist texture. Malted Barley Flour also prolongs the shelf life of baked goods.


Bob's Red Mill (a company I love and it's just down the road from my house!) makes this type of flour!

0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Nov, 2010 06:20 pm
@CalamityJane,
Oh, thank you, I'm going to try those..
0 Replies
 
Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Nov, 2010 06:51 pm
@boomerang,
Found this in the comments of another Tulsa World article about the food at Pennington's. It is from 3 years ago, but if you're feeling adventurous, you could try emailing or calling to see if this person still works there and get the exact recipe for their rolls.

Quote:
[email protected], (3 years ago)
Will be glad to share the recipe for Baked Fudge. I'll post it on my blog this evening. From the main Tulsa World page, scroll down to Lifestyle Blogs, and then click "Small Bites.

And yes, we have a copy of the Pennington's cookbook. Are there any recipes you're looking for in particular? You can e-mail me or call me at 581-8486 and I can share those with you.
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Nov, 2010 07:08 pm
@Butrflynet,
Hey! Doesn't Eva know some people at the Tulsa paper? I think she does! I think she also knows quite a few foodies in the area. I'll PM her.
0 Replies
 
Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Nov, 2010 07:25 pm
@Butrflynet,
Ah ha! She's still there and I found her blog. I posted a request for the recipe. Let's see if she responds. If she does, I'll post it here.
 

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