lovejoy
 
Reply Thu 4 Nov, 2010 09:44 pm
This is the word absinthe and the given pronunciation of it but I'm English and this is double dutch to me.

How are we supposed to understand what this is telling us?

Not the second one which is self explanatory, the bit before it.

Absinthe (pronounced /ˈæbsɪnθ/ AB-sinth)
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Type: Question • Score: 4 • Views: 2,201 • Replies: 8
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MonaLeeza
 
  1  
Reply Fri 5 Nov, 2010 03:21 am
@lovejoy,
It's phonetic. We had to learn it at school.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Phonetic_Alphabet_chart_for_English_dialects
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McTag
 
  1  
Reply Fri 5 Nov, 2010 04:34 am
It's French, that's why.

We (try to) pronounce it in the French way, and there's no real equivalent in English we could copy or rhyme it with.

So you'll just have to try to copy Monsieur Sarkozy or Antoine de Caunes.

As for the ab- part, I'd just say it like the ab- in "screaming ab-dabs" or "abs and pecs"
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Fri 5 Nov, 2010 06:03 am
Pronouncing the "th" sound as it is pronounced in English is definitely not the French pronunciation. In French, "th" is always pronounced as "t" is pronounced in English.
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contrex
 
  1  
Reply Fri 5 Nov, 2010 11:45 am
I would probably write "absant" to give a monoglot English person a clue.

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JTT
 
  1  
Reply Fri 5 Nov, 2010 11:53 am
@McTag,
Quote:
We (try to) pronounce it in the French way,


Only those who put on airs do that, McTag.

Words that come into a new language do not come with the original language's sound system for a very good reason. We can't possibly learn the sound systems of all the languages of the world.

It's funny that this suggestion seems only to be made for certain languages not for all of them.

When speaking in Romish, speak as the Romans.
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Fri 5 Nov, 2010 01:29 pm
@JTT,
JTT wrote:

Quote:
We (try to) pronounce it in the French way,


Only those who put on airs do that, McTag.


JTT, I cannot hold back from declaring that, in my opinion, you are an extremely annoying and utterly opinionated loudmouthed dickweed.

If you know some French, pronounce it the way you know it should be pronounced. If you don't, then learn some. Ignore JTT. He is a "wanker" as we say here.
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Fri 5 Nov, 2010 06:31 pm
@contrex,
Quote:
If you know some French, pronounce it the way you know it should be pronounced. If you don't, then learn some.


Then you'd only be a "sound much worse" putting on airs asshole, C.

You completely ignored the reasons and obviously got all upset because you're one of these people who puts on airs.

How do you propose learning the sound system for all the languages from which English has borrowed words? It's ludicrous to suggest that we try such a thing. Have you ever heard a foreigner speak? They sound like foreigners because matching the sound system of other languages isn't something that's easy to do.

Children who are fluent in two languages don't intersperse their English with the sounds of their second language for those words that are borrowed from their second language.

How would they even know they are borrowed? And if they did, it wouldn't matter for they are bright enough to know that they are speaking English.
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laughoutlood
 
  1  
Reply Fri 5 Nov, 2010 08:36 pm
@lovejoy,
When I pronounce absinthe I put on my extremely annoying and utterly opinionated loudmouthed dickweed lisp because absinthe makes the heart grow fonder and the fox follows it's own scent.
0 Replies
 
 

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